"The single largest reduction to grind we’ve ever made." Major changes are coming to Dead by Daylight, including an overhauled progression system and tweaked perks. The aim is to shake up the current "meta" and re-balance the game, forcing players to consider new tactics and strategies. The changes will be added in the forthcoming mid-chapter update for Chapter 24: Roots of Dread - that hits the public test build on 29th June and will be fully implemented in July. The biggest change comes to the progression system, specifically with Prestige that resets the level of a character to increase the chances of unlocking rarer nodes in the Bloodweb. Now, prestiging a character for the first time unlocks Tier 1 of their perks across all characters and will be the same for Tier 2 and 3 perks. It means this is "the single largest reduction to grind we've ever made, cutting it by roughly 75 percent," says Behaviour Interactive. Further, prestiging a character no longer resets perks and items. Prestige tiers have been increased to 100 with more unlockable rewards. When the new system is implemented, Behaviour assures that all existing unlocked perks and items will be retained. TLDR : Overhauled progression system🩸⬇️🔓Prestiging a character for the 1st time will unlock Tier 1 of their perks on all characters, making them available to use right away. Same for prestige/tiers 2&3.👀 No more resets!🏆 Prestige to 100 and earn rewards along the way pic.twitter.com/y0O6gc32LR— Dead by Daylight (@DeadByBHVR) June 27, 2022 Another major change is to the perk system. This will impact both Killers and Survivors in order to rebalance perks. A full list can be found on the Behaviour blog. Further gameplay changes are also coming. For instance, it will now take longer to power up a generator, with the aim of promoting increased interactions between Killers and Survivors. Improvements are being made to Killer gameplay as kill rates are lower than expected. Breaking pallets and kicking generators will be quicker among other changes, to ensure "the Killer feel
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When the last abortion clinic in Texas closes its doors for good, Prestonwood Pregnancy Center will remain. So will Agape, with locations in Round Rock, Austin, Cedar Park, and Taylor. So will the Pregnancy Help Center, operating in Texas’s Brazoria County since 1990. These are pregnancy resource centers, also known as crisis pregnancy centers, and for many years, their main mission has been to convince people not to have abortions (the three centers above did not respond to Vox’s request for comment). But now that the Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, abortion bans are either in effect or imminent in Texas and more than 20 other states around the country. In the coming months and years, pregnancy resource centers will have a bigger role to play — one that has researchers and reproductive justice advocates worried. While many centers offer supplies like baby clothes and diapers, they’ve also been criticized for misleading pregnant people and spreading false claims a
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Clayton McCray, 27, stands by the Allegheny County jail in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on June 5. McCray’s lower leg was amputated in 2020 after a wound on his heel became infected while he was incarcerated at the jail, he says. Stephanie Strasburg for Vox America’s 1.7 million incarcerated people have a constitutional right to medical treatment. During the pandemic, many of them say they didn’t get it in time. By Jun 28, 2022, 7:00am EDT Photographs by Stephanie Strasburg This story is part of The Aftermath, a Vox series about the collateral health effects of the Covid-19 pandemic in communities around the US. This series is supported in part by the NIHCM Foundation. When 25-year-old Clayton McCray was sent to jail in September 2019, he had no idea the detention would end up costing him his leg. But that’s what happened, in large part because the pandemic exacerbated his poor medical treatment behind bars. A shooting injury eight years earlier had damaged his spine, initially leaving him paralyzed from the waist down. After surgery and years of physical therapy, he could once again jump, swim, and play basketball. “I fought hard to get to where I was,” he told Vox. But he still had a condition known as “drop foot,” or foot dragging. He needed orthotic insoles, regular treatment to remove dead tissue, and daily wound cleanings; without them, he was vulnerable to developing open wounds, and even bone infections. Clayton McCray worked hard to recover after a shooting injury left him paralyzed from the waist down, enduring surgery and years of physical therapy to be able to move again. When the pandemic hit, McCray was still in Pittsburgh’s Allegheny County jail awaiting a hearing for alleged drug possession. Suddenly, his already-spotty medical care became even sparser. By June 2020, he needed a wheelchair. Sometimes he couldn’t hop or crawl the short distance from his bunk to the toilet and urinated on himself. Meanwhile, the smell from his untreated wound filled the cell. Jail staff did not allow a specialist from the local hospital to examine McCray’s infected foot in person, he has claimed. “They blamed Covid,” McCray said. By September, the infection had progressed so far that his right leg had to be amputated below the knee. Health care in US jails and prisons was generally abysmal before the pandemic, and it appears to have fallen further, even for those who were not among the astronomical number of people sickened or killed by Covid-19 while incarcerated. Basic requests for medical treatment often went unanswered as facilities stopped outside and specialist appointments and attempted to navigate severe staffing shortages, according to our reporting. Even as the initial crisis of the pandemic’s arrival has waned, many behind bars are still suffering the effects of denied or postponed care. These failures have potentially affected a massive number of people. McCray was one of 8.7 million who entered a US jail in 2020, more than half a million of whom were incarcerated at any given time (and more than 80 percent were, like McCray, simply awaiting their day in court). Another 1.2 million were in state and federal prisons. Put another way, more than 1 in every 150 adults in the US was behind bars on any given day, by far the highest rate of any country in the world. The alleged medical neglect also adds to stark racial health disparities in the US. People of color, particularly Black people, are much more likely to be arrested and have been up to seven times more likely to be incarcerated than their white counterparts. As of 2018, approximately one in every 44 Black men in the US was locked up. The Allegheny County jail rises on the banks of the Monongahela River in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on June 5. Clayton McCray is suing the jail’s medical officials, alleging that jail health care staff failed to provide standard medical care. Data about medical care in carceral facilities is nearly impossible to come by. But two dozen people incarcerated in more than 15 facilities across 10 states during the pandemic have told Vox about frequent cancellations of appointments, months-long delays, denials of specialty treatment, lack of post-surgery follow-ups, and going months without daily medications. Over the course of three months of reporting, their stories have been backed up by documents, lawyers, and loved ones. As a result of this lack of care, some lost limbs, others lost their mobility, and all we spoke with lost their pre-pandemic level of health. When people are put behind bars, whether they are awaiting trial like McCray was or are serving a sentence, the loss of liberty itself is supposed to be the point, not going without basic health care. But this happens daily in jails and prisons nationwide. And the pandemic has made it far worse. Care, postponed Medical care behind bars is complex, with on-site nurses and physicians charged with addressing a vast range of issues, from checkups to substance use treatment to end-of-life care, often in overwhelming circumstances. Some jails and state prisons contract with private corporations to provide medical care, while others, in part, administer their own or rely on public or nonprofit providers. A few, such as New York City’s jail system, partner with the local health system. Oversight is extremely rare, and people in custody generally cannot change doctors or even seek a second opinion. And this is a particularly vulnerable population. Incarcerated people are more likely to have serious chronic health conditions than their outside counterparts; one study suggested they tend to have health needs similar to people 10 or 15 years older. Believe it or not, incarcerated people are the only US residents with a constitutional right to health care. In 1976, the US Supreme Court ruled that “deliberate indifference to serious medical needs of prisoners” violated the Eighth Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment. “Health care is constitutionally mandated, but it doesn’t mean it’s any good,” said Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein, a health equity scholar at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and co-founder of the Covid Prison Project. Arizona’s prison system has been sued for reportedly providing inadequate care. And a 2001 class-action lawsuit asserted that the California prison system’s medical and mental health care was horrific enough to be unconstitutional. The pandemic erected even more barriers between incarcerated people and medical access. Our reporting found that jail and prison officials frequently denied outside appointments and prohibited outside providers from entering, while in-house doctors and nurses prioritized Covid-19 over other concerns. Medical workers were in critically short supply as people called in sick — or quit and were not replaced. A dire shortage of correctional officers also impeded care. Officers are needed to escort people to appointments and call in medical emergencies. Homer Venters, a court-appointed federal monitor overseeing health care behind bars, told Vox this spring that he routinely visits correctional facilities now where half of the correctional officer positions are still unfilled. California prison officials have admitted that the pandemic has caused a significant backlog of essential visits, with more than 10,000 overdue specialty appointments, approximately 6,000 overdue primary care appointments, and near
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Kyrie Irving has decided to exercise his $36.9m option for the coming season and will remain under contract with the Brooklyn Nets.“Normal people keep the world going, but those who dare to be different lead us into tomorrow. I’ve made my decision to opt in. See you in the fall,” he told The Athletic on Monday. On Twitter, Irving posted a separate statement: “I know who I am,” he wrote. For now, that still means a member of the Nets.The seven-time All-Star averaged 27.4 points and 5.8 assists this past season for the Nets, with whom he has spent the last three seasons. He’s about to enter the final season in a four-year, $137m deal with Brooklyn.Irving had until Wednesday to inform the Nets of his opt-in decision. It closes one element of the ongoing saga regarding Irving’s future, which has been one of the biggest storylines as the league prepares for the start of free agency on Thursday.However, it may not be over. Irving could still have his contract extended before free agency begins. Also, the Nets could still trade him and, in fact, teams may be more interested in a deal now that Irving is on an expiring contract.He appeared in only 29 regular-season games this past season, largely because of his decision to not be vaccinated against Covid-19. That made him ineligible to play in most of Brooklyn’s home games, until getting an exemption to New York City’s vaccine mandate in the spring.Irving said after the Nets were swept by Boston in the first round that he planned on remaining in Brooklyn, even talking about him and Kevin Durant managing the franchise along with general manager Sean Marks and owner Joe Tsai. But Marks later made clear that discussions about Irving’s future would have to involve discussions about being more available to the team, and they could not come to an agreement on a long-term extension that could have paid Irving an additional $185m over four years.Irving also took a leave of absence from the team during the 2020-21 season, though the Nets looked on track to reach the NBA finals before Irving sprained his ankle in Game 4 of the East semifinals against the Milwaukee Bucks, who rallied to win the series in seven g
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The chair of the committee on standards in public life has urged Boris Johnson to appoint a new ethics adviser immediately or risk undermining public confidence in the rules.Christopher Geidt resigned as the prime minister’s ethics adviser earlier this month, saying he had been put in an “impossible and odious” position by being asked to rubber stamp a plan to maintain steel tariffs.Lord Geidt had previously conceded at a hearing with MPs that it was “reasonable” to ask whether Johnson may have broken the ministerial code by being fined for breaching Covid rules.After Geidt’s resig
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Negotiations for a “critical” trade deal with the EU have stalled over perceptions Australia isn’t “fair dinkum” on climate change action and due to a fractured relationship with France, Anthony Albanese said.The prime minister met with his Spanish counterpart, Pedro Sánchez, on Tuesday in Madrid before the Nato summit, marking the first bilateral visit by an Australian prime minister.Albanese said the “very warm and productive meeting” lasted for more than a hour, but discussions about a trade relationship “essentially stalled”.“It was clear that there were two impediment
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Posted on Jun 27, 2018 by Jeff Zych Strategy has always been a fuzzy concept in my mind. What goes into a strategy? What makes a strategy good or bad? How is it different from vision and goals? Good Strategy / Bad Strategy, by UCLA Anderson School of Management professor Richard P. Rumelt, takes a nebulous concept and makes it concrete. He explains what goes into developing a strategy, what makes a strategy good, and what makes a strategy bad – which makes good strategy even clearer. As I read the book, I kept underlining passages and scribbling notes in the margins because it’s so full of good information and useful techniques that are just as applicable to my everyday work as they are to running a multi-national corporation. To help me use the concepts I learned, I decided to publish my notes and key takeaways so I can refer back to them later. The Kernel of Strategy Strategy is designing a way to deal with a challenge. A good strategy, therefore, must identify the challenge to be overcome, and design a way to overcome it. To do that, the kernel of a good strategy contains three elements: a diagnosis, a guiding policy, and coherent action. A diagnosis defines the challenge. What’s holding you back from reaching your goals? A good diagnosis simplifies the often overwhelming complexity of reality down to a simpler story by identifying certain aspects of the situation as critical. A good diagnosis often uses a metaphor, analogy, or an existing accepted framework to make it simple and understandable, which then suggests a domain of action. A guiding policy is an overall approach chosen to cope with or overcome the obstacles identified in the diagnosis. Like the guardrails on a highway, the guiding policy directs and constrains action in certain directions without defining exactly what shall be done. A set of coherent actions dictate how the guiding policy will be carried out. The actions should be coherent, meaning the use of resources, policies, and maneuvers that are undertaken should be coordinated and support each other (not fight each other, or be independent from one another). Good Strategy vs. Bad Strategy Good strategy is simple and obvious. Good strategy identifies the key challenge to overcome. Bad strategy fails to identify the nature of the challenge. If you don’t know what the problem is, you can’t evaluate alternative guidi
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Max and Ben Ringham had wildly clashing music tastes growing up. There were “sound wars” in their bedroom as a result. They did, however, pool their equipment – musical instruments, keyboards, samplers – which piled up high at one end of the room.That pile turned into a mountain and then followed them into a shared London studio in their 20s when they decided to make music together. They have now been in a professional partnership of 25 years which began with composing drum’n’bass records, then making TV production music, to becoming one (or two, to be accurate) of the biggest names in sound and music composition for the stage.They have worked with everyone from Jamie Lloyd (on the feted Pinter at the Pinter season in the West End) to David Rosenberg (of Darkfield). With Ella Hickson, they conceived the groundbreaking National Theatre production Anna, delivered through binaural headphones. Blindness at the Donmar Warehouse, an installation featuring Juliet Stevenson’s voice, was one of the most experimentally daring shows of the pandemic with its rumbling and thrumming layers of sound, while Pass Over, at the Kiln, carried ominous, buzzing notes to chime with the themes of existential fear in the play. More recently, they designed the sound for Prima Facie, starring Jodie Comer, which featured the harsh pelt of rain against dangerous notes of electronica. The Ringhams have four years between them – Max is the older at 50 – but don’t have the power dynamic of a dominant/passive brother. They play a conversational tag when we meet – Max chipping into Ben’s thoughts, Ben building on Max’s ideas – which seems, well, almost orchestral. They have been on the receiving end of the repeated joke that they are one person parading as two: “People have said ‘I bet Ben or Max doesn’t exist,’” says Ben.Rain and electronica … Jodie Comer in Prima Facie. Photograph: Helen MurrayThe brothers rose from a dynasty of sound. If there were music wars in their childhood bedroom, there were bigger battles playing out elsewhere in their north London family home. The children in the flat above theirs were into punk and three of them grew up to become professional musicians. Their father, John Ringham, was an actor and accomplished musician with a grand piano in the living room. “Dad listened to music relentlessly, so he’d either play the piano or turn on radios as he walked through the house, leaving each one on,” says Max.Their two older sisters held the same passion: “Jessica was really into AC/DC, Hannah was into an eclectic range of stuff,” says Max, while their mother, Felicitas Ringham, a French literature academic, wrote dictionaries and books on semiotics.When Max went to Belize for six months, Ben agreed to oversee his drum’n’bass work and was hooked by the time Ben returned: “I refused to give it up because I really enjoyed it.” At first, they lived off shared tins of beans and hustled for commissions. “We did a lot of library music [generic production music]. It was a really good discipline in making styles of music very quickly..” Ben adds: “It’s about being intuitive and trusting your abili
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The Houston Texans had been told that their former quarterback Deshaun Watson was sexually assaulting and harassing women during massage sessions, but instead of trying to stop him, the team provided him with resources to enable his actions and “turned a blind eye” to his behavior, according to a lawsuit filed Monday.The lawsuit against the team was filed in Houston by one of the 24 women who had previously sued Watson over allegations of sexual misconduct when he played for the Texans. Last week, the women’s attorney, Tony Buzbee, announced 20 of the 24 lawsuits have been settled.Deshaun Watson, now with the Cleveland Browns, practiced at a minicamp on June 14. Diamond Images via Getty ImagesWatson, who was later traded to the Cleveland Browns, has denied any wrongdoing and vowed to clear his name. Watson is facing discipline from the NFL over the allegations. He is set to have a hearing this week with NFL disciplinary officer Sue L. Robinson, who will decide if the 26-year-old violated the league’s personal conduct policy. Robinson is expected to rule before the Browns open training camp late next month.In their lawsuits, the women accused Watson of exposing himself, touching them with his penis or kissing them against their will during massage appointments. One woman alleged Watson forced her to perform oral sex.The lawsuit against the Texans accuses the team and some of its employees of having been told or being aware of Watson’s troubling behavior. Joni Honn, the owner of a massage company that was contracted with the Texans, told police investigators that her therapists were aware of Watson’s “known tendency to push boundaries during massage sessions,” according to the lawsuit.Deshaun Watson, then with the Houston Texans, speaks during a news conference in 2019. via Associated PressHonn told the Texans, including the team’s head trainer, that Watson was reaching out to random women on Instagram for massages in early 2020, according to the lawsuit.Magen Weisheit, another massage therapist who worked with the Texans, told Houston police investigators she and others were well aware of Watson’s conduct during massage sessions. When Weisheit learned of the allegations made against Watson by a woman who filed the first lawsuit against him, she wrote in a text to the woman’s former co-worker that she could reach out to the team’s player personnel person but “they don’t do much about the situation though,” according to the lawsuit.“Despite being actually aware of what can only be described as troubling behavior, the Houston Texans turned a blind eye. Worse, the Houston Texans organization enabled Watson’s egregious behavior. The Texans also protected and shielded Watson — for Watson’s own protection and the protection of the organization itself,” according to the lawsuit.The woman’s lawsuit alleges the Texans provided Watson with various resources, including rooms at a Houston hotel, massage tables and a non-disclosure agreement the women were told to sign, that allowed the quarterback “to further his misconduct with women by turning the massage sessions into something sexual.”The Texans are also ac
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Wimbledon’s Covid-19 protocols are under review after Matteo Berrettini was forced to withdraw from Wimbledon on the morning of his first round match after testing positive for Covid-19.Berrettini was one of the biggest contenders for the title having reached the Wimbledon final last year. After being out for nearly three months due to undergoing surgery on his finger, the Italian had returned at the beginning of the grass season and immediately won nine matches in a row, with titles in Stuttgart and Queen’s.Sign up to The Recap, our weekly email of editors’ picks.The review comes after Marin Cilic, another former finalist and a semi-finalist at the French Open earlier this month, had
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Electric vehicles continue to generate headlines while slurping energy from the power grids, but even smaller producers are struggling with supply chain issues. Lurking at the Goodwood Festival of Sp
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The mayor of an Italian town has banned hairdressers and barbers from shampooing their customers’ hair twice in an attempt to conserve water during one of the most severe droughts in decades.Carlo Gubellini, the mayor of Castenaso, near Bologna in the Emilia-Romagna region, said thousands of litres of water was squandered each day through double-shampooing, which many hairdressers believe is beneficial, and hence double-rinsing.He is believed to be the only mayor in Italy to take such a measure, which will involve checks and fines of up to €500 for salons breaking the rule, as Italy fights drought during an intense, protracted heatwave.Castenaso, which has a population of 16,000, is home
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58 percent of US workers now have the option to work where they want at least one day a week, while 35 percent can work remotely up to five days a week, according to a new survey conducted by manag
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This article is part of the Guardian’s Women’s Euro 2022 Experts’ Network, a cooperation between some of the best media organisations from the 16 countries who have qualified. theguardian.com is running previews from two countries each day in the run-up to the tournament kicking off on 6 July.Overview“I might have been called a football romantic by people on the outside,” the national team coach, Martin Sjögren says, “and I must admit that I am attracted to the attacking part of the game. My philosophy is, if you have to categorise it, an attacking one.”That is in contrast to Norwegian teams of the past – men’s and women’s – and Sjögren’s style of football isdemanding, but also very exciting. In qualifying Norway played only six of their eight games (the last two were cancelled because of the pandemic) but still topped their group, winning all six, scoring 34 goals in the process and conceding one.Over his five years as the Norway coach, Sjögren has mainly stayed loyal to variations of his 4-4-2 system. At the Algarve Cup last February, the Swede did try out three central defenders in matches against Portugal and Italy, but quickly reverted to a line of four defenders and has stuck to that since. He now feels that he has the flexibility within his squad to make tactical changes throughout matches and during a long tournament.Sjögren hopes that having the star duo of Caroline Graham Hansen and Ada Hegerberg available up front will mean that Norway do this time what they failed to do in 2017: score goals. He will also be delighted to have the captain Maren Mjelde back in the squad after a long injury absence. The 32-year-old truly is the heart, soul and leader of Norway’s defence.There is, however, a big question surrounding the goalkeeper position. With the first choice, Cecilie Fiskerstrand, out with a ruptured ACL the position is now completely open. Guro Pettersen, Aurora Mikalsen and Sunniva Skoglund are all viable options.As the squad was announced, Sjögren and Mjelde said that the aim was to reach the semis. “We have a championship ahead of us where there are five, six, seven teams that could win,” Sjögren has said. “Th
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Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Joe Burrow is getting involved outside the playing field.The NFL’s Comeback Player of the Year on Monday shared an Instagram post that championed abortion rights.The post contains examples of women hurt by the Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade’s abortion right. Burrow’s entry also arrived after a law essentially banning abortion after six weeks went into effect in Ohio, the Cincinnati Enquirer noted.“I’m not pro-murdering babies,” the 2021 post begins provocatively.“I’m pro-Becky who found at her 20-week anatomy scan that the infant she had been so excited to bring into this world had developed without life-sustaining organs,” it continues.“I’m pro-Susan who was sexually assaulted on her way home from work, only to come to the horrific realization that her assailant planted his seed in her when she got a positive pregnancy test result a month later.”The entry lists other scenarios of unwanted or dangerous pregnancies. Similar versions appear on Twitter threads.Joe Burrow's shared post.InstagramBurrow, who in February led the Bengals to the Super Bowl, where they lost to the Los Angeles Rams, also advocated for gun control following recent high-profile mass shootings. He called on politicians to enact tougher measur
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A few months ago, a friend of mine mentioned that they still, in the year 2021, used RSS feeds to subscribe to the blogs they liked. I was incredulous? RSS? That orange button I used to see on websites years ago? The one that returned XML if you accidentally clicked it? People still used that? People still provided that? Apparently the answer was yes. My friend also said that if I implemented RSS on my blog, they would subscribe to it. So I thought about it, and decided to do it. I forgot about it until today, but when I did remember it didn’t take long to implement at all. Figuring out what to do I’ll be honest, I don’t really know how people in real life implement RSS. I’m sure they all have WordPress or Jekyll blogs and there’s plugins for this sort of thing. I figured that probably wasn’t going to help me since this blog runs on a bespoke mess of Go, so I went straight for the official RSS specification, which can be found here. As of writing, we were at RSS 2.0.11. RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication, and you can really tell they mean it. The spec document is short and to-the-point – it describes what an RSS XML file looks like. You make that XML file available and people can point their RSS readers to it and It Just Works. So, I just need to make that XML file happen. What an rss.xml looks like You can go read the spec if you want the full details (highly recommend – as I said, very short and easy to read), but I think my templated rss-channel.xml does a good job of describing a minimal structure. {{title}} {{link}} {{description}} en-US {{pubDate}} {{{items}}} An RSS feed consists of one singular channel, which must have a title, link, and description. I added some of the optional fields like language and publishing date since they weren’t hard to figure out for me, but there’s many others that I skipped over. Following these are the items, which describe individual posts in your feed. My rss-item.xml is an example of that. {{metadata.title}} {{getFullUrl slug}} {{metadata.summary}} [email protected] {{rssDatetime metadata.time}} No single field
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Brendon McCullum fancies England’s ultra-aggressive start to life under Ben Stokes has set alarm bells ringing in dressing rooms around the world, with the new head coach hoping his players now push the limits of what is possible.Hot on the heels of the 3-0 clean-sweep over the world champions, New Zealand, comes the rearranged fifth Test against India at Edgbaston on Friday and another chance for England’s players – their batting lineup in particular – to go on the offensive.McCullum has kept a relatively low profile since his appointment as Test head coach six weeks ago but his attacking mantra – something he says Stokes has taken even further during team talks – has produced instant, breathtaking results.England collectively scored at 4.5 per over – a figure not witnessed at home since the 2005 Ashes – and Jonny Bairstow has led the way with nearly 400 runs at a strike-rate of 120. Speaking after the seven-wicket victory at Headingley, sealed with Bairstow’s 10th six of the series, McCullum believes a message has been sent.He said: “The World Test Champions were a formidable opponent and the alarm bells have probably gone off somewhat around world cricket as to how this team is going to play. We need to make sure against a different opposition we’re well researched, well planned, well prepared for that and try and roll out a similar kind of performance.”With these orders from the 40-year-old comes a warning that going hard at bowlers will not work every time – not that McCullum is urging caution. Instead he will be the soft Kiwi voice on their shoulder goading them to head towards danger, something any adrenaline-seeking visitor to New Zealand may well relate to.The Spin: sign up and get our weekly cricket email.“I hope we take it too far because then we’ll know exactly where that line is,” he said. “Until you do that, you’re not really sure. We’ve seen it with the England white-ball stuff – there have been times where they’ve probably pushed too hard, and then they know. I think it’ll be the same with us – we’ve got to keep exploring what that line is.“There will be some tough times, I have no doubt about tha
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Cook 500g of peas for 4-5 minutes in boiling, lightly salted water. Drain in a colander and leave to cool under cold running water. Tip the peas into a food processor, add 40g of butter and process to a thick, smooth paste. Do not overprocess. Transfer to a mixing bowl and chill.Once the mixture is cold, beat 2 egg yolks lightly and stir in thoroughly, then mix in 5 tbsp of fine, dry breadcrumbs and 1 small tsp of wasabi paste.Put a couple of large handfuls of dried breadcrumbs – about 70g – in a shallow dish. In a second dish, beat 2 eggs – just enough to mix the whites and yolks. Shape the pea mixture into six small, round cakes (easiest done with lightly floured hands), then press them, one at a time, first into the beaten egg, then into the breadcrumbs and place them on a tray or
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For those of us with penchant for older technology, there’s something special about operating with older hardware. Whether it’s a decades-old camera, a vintage keyboard, or a home computer from the 1980s, the modern equivalent just doesn’t quite compare. But working with older parts definitely isn’t for the faint-hearted, as the passage of time has taken its toll on their reliability. Is it time to recognize that the supply of replacement vintage parts is not infinite, and to switch from using original hardware to more modern alternatives? [Retro Recipes] poses this question after a particularly difficult-to-find Amiga fault, and discusses it while evaluating a replacement Amiga made entirely from modern parts. The new Amiga in question is a recreation of an A12
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One of the exasperating features of everyday gender inequality is that couples can be aware of imbalances in doing housework, state a dislike of them, and yet fall right into them anyway.The discrepancy shows up most obviously in the amount of time men and women spend on tasks such as cleaning and caregiving, including when both work full-time. Yet even many couples who pride themselves on a fair distribution of duties aren’t so balanced when it comes to carrying the harder-to-quantify “mental load,” the taxing work of managing a household and anticipating its many needs. (Same-sex couples tend to be more egalitarian, but can end up in lopsided arrangements as well.) Today, men in different-sex relationships contribute more than they did in the 1960s and ’70s (a low bar), but often take on a “helper” role under the “manager” role of their female partner, who’s saddled with noticing what must be done.The job of noticing is a recurring theme of Equal Partners: Improving Gender Equality at Home, a new book by Kate Mangino, a gender expert who works with international nonprofits. Mangino is aware of how American society could be made more equitable among genders—say
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Courtesy of the Jolley family The doctors are not all right Doctors need mental health support, but the medical profession often punishes them for getting it. By Julia Belluz Joseph Rushmore for Vox America isn’t taking care of caregivers 48 million people provide unpaid care to their loved ones in the US. Here’s how to help them. By Katherine Harmon Courage Nick Danielson for Vox They save skiers and hikers in the wilderness. Here’s how they think about resilience. Search-and-rescue responders have powerful new ways of recovering from trauma. by Christopher Tedeschi Michelle McLoughlin for Vox Maternity wards are shuttering across the US during the pandemic The closures could make giving birth more dangerous in the United States. by Dylan Scott Stephanie Strasburg for Vox Health care in jails and prisons is terrible. The pandemic made it even worse. America’s 1.7 million incarcerated people have a constitutional right to medical treatment. During the pandemic, many of them say they didn’t get it in time. by Victoria Law This series is supported in part by the NIHCM Foundation.
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A German court has handed a five-year jail sentence to a 101-year-old former Nazi concentration camp guard, the oldest person so far to go on trial for complicity in war crimes during the Holocaust.Josef Schütz was found guilty on Tuesday of being an accessory to murder while working as a prison guard at the Sachsenhausen camp in Oranienburg, north of Berlin, between 1942 and 1945.Schütz had said he did “absolutely nothing” and was not aware of the crimes being carried out at the camp. “I don’t know why I am here,” he said at the close of the trial on Monday.But prosecutors said Schütz “knowingly and willingly” participated in the murders of 3,518 prisoners at the camp in his role as a guard, though he was not accused of having actively carried out any of the murders.More than 200,000 people, including Jews, Roma, regime opponents and gay people, were detained at Sachsenhausen between 1936 and 1945. Tens of thousands of inmates were murdered or died from forced labour, medical experiments, hunger or disease before the camp was liberated by Soviet troops, according to the Sachsenhausen Memorial and Museum.Prosecutors said Schütz aided and abetted the “execution by firing squad of Soviet prisoners of war in 1942” and the murder of prisoners “using the poisonous gas Zyklon B”. He was 21 years old at the time.Schütz made several inconsistent statements about his past during the trial, complaining that he was getting “mixed up” and that he had never
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Based on work of Chinese novelist Jin Yong. Code: To Jin Yong is a new wuxia game being developed by the Tencent-owned Lightspeed Studios that shows the power of Unreal Engine 5. Based on a series of novels by Chinese novelist Jin Yong, the game will explore the iconic characters and environments of the books and TV adaptations from over the years. A proof of concept trailer has been released and it looks stunning. Code: To Jin Yong trailer UE5 technology like engine design, Motion Matching, Contr
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UN biodiversity negotiations have reached crisis point due to a lack of engagement from governments, leading NGOs have warned, three years after experts revealed that Earth’s life-support systems are collapsing.Last week, countries met in Nairobi for an extra round of talks on an agreement to halt the human-driven destruction of the natural world, with the final targets set to be agreed at Cop15 in Montreal. Governments have never met a target they have set for themselves on halting the destruction of nature despite scientists warning in 2019 that one million species face extinction, and tha
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Warwickshire lose their second wicket in their quest to meet Northant’s mammoth 451. Chris Benjamin cracks Simon Kerrigan to mid-on. Warwicks 100-2.Spot on from Katherine Brunt, yesterday:A wicket at Chelmsford at last! Hampshire stick it out for 45 minutes but Felix Organ loses his stump after a fabulous 65 off 71 balls. Hants 97-1, need 203 to win. The wicket-taker? Harmer of course.Two wickets at New Road! Neser and Hogan cleaning up Worcester’s tail - Roderick c off Neser for six; Leach c off Hogan for 2. Worcs 166 for eight, a lead of 298.Daniel Bell-Drummond looked in fine nick yeste
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Skyrim has been around for quite the time, with many a new edition or various mod upgrades being made available in its 10 plus years on the market. However, we now also have a mod that covers any version of Skyrim that releases even further down the line (which, let's be honest, will likely happen). The mod in question comes from Nexus Mods user xilamonstrr and brings Skyrim's big scaly dragons into super sharp focus. I am talking about seeing all the little details, right down to each beast's scars, in much, much, higher definition. And, while 16k may seem a touch excessive given that most games tend to opt for 1440p, xilamonstrr has a good reason for choosing this resolution. In short, the dragons in Skyrim are huge, and t
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Elon Musk just passed the 100 million follower mark on Twitter, becoming the sixth user on the platform to reach a nine-digit follower count. According to SocialBlade, Musk hit the milestone sometime between June 26th and June 27th, gaining over 150,000 followers between the two days. As of this writing, Musk now has 100,059,886 followers. Hitting the milestone is interesting for a couple of reasons. First is the obvious fact that Musk is currently in the process of buying Twitter for $44 billion, which could eventually put him in the unique position of being the only leader of a major social media network who’s actually good at using their social media network. In contrast, Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook page is broadly a feed of press releases, while Instagram head Adam Moss
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Mary Mara, who appeared on television shows including “Ray Donovan,” “Dexter” and “ER” in an acting career that spanned more than 30 years, has died in what New York authorities said appeared to be a drowning accident.The New York State Police said Monday a woman identified as Mara, 61, was found shortly after 8 a.m. Sunday in the St. Lawrence River near Cape Vincent, in upstate New York close to the Canadian border.Mary Mara, pictured in 2006 at the Los Angeles Film Festival.Matthew Simmons via Getty ImagesPolice said that an official cause of death is still pending, but that there were no signs of foul play and that it appeared Mara drowned while swimming.In a statement, her manager, Craig Dorfman, described her as “electric, funny, and a true individual” who was well-lov
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Formula One and the Mercedes team have condemned the three-time world champion Nelson Piquet for using racist language when speaking about Lewis Hamilton. Piquet used the term in an interview that was conducted last year but which was released publicly on Monday night. F1 has a commitment to oppose racism and encourage diversity in the sport.Piquet was speaking in November to Motorsport Talk’s Ricardo Oliveira in Portuguese about Hamilton’s clash with Red Bull’s Max Verstappen at the British Grand Prix in 2021, which ended with the Dutch driver going off the track and suffering a major impact with the barriers.The video of the interview was picked up by Brazilian media including CNN, which reported his words as he referred to the incident.Quick GuideHow do I sign up for sport breakin
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“Hi, please don’t do this” Also in Steam Deck news, Valve’s Lawrence Yang – a designer who worked on the on the handheld PC – has weighed in on a widely shared mod that replaces the pre-installed SSD with a larger, faster model. His advice: don’t do it. The mod, by Twitter user Belly Jelly, swaps out the dinky default M.2 2230 SSD for a slightly longer M.2 2242 drive. It seems to mostly work fine except for making “the heat spreader bow a bit.” It was subsequently shared by PC Gamer, GameSpot and others before Yang tweeted a warning that such a change would “significantly shorten the life of your Deck” by moving thermal pads vital to cooling the charger IC (integrated circuit).
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Set to brighten your October. Ubisoft briefly published a 20th October release date for its promising-looking Nintendo Switch sequel Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope. The company has yet to officially trumpet the date, but it was live for a while on Ubisoft's store (thanks, Gematsu) ahead of today's Nintendo Direct, which is scheduled for 2pm UK time. Today's announcement stream is set to feature third-party games for Nintendo Switch - of which Sparks of Hope is a prime example. It seems likely we'll see this made official then. A first look at Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope from last year. Mario + Rabbids is a mash-up of company mascots in a tight, turn-based strategy game filled with humour an
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The population of England and Wales has hit a historic high of 59,597,300, according to the first results from the 2021 census.The count was based on questionnaires filled out by households on Sunday 21 March 2021 and is an 6.3% increase on the 2011 figure of 56,075,912 – an extra 3.5 million people.It means the wider UK population is almost 67 million, once census results published last month for Northern Ireland, showing a population of 1.9 million, and the latest estimate for Scotland, of 5.47 million, are added in. The total is on course to break the 70 million mark in the next five years, but population growth has decreased slightly over the last decade.The last UK population estimate made by the Office for National Statistics was 67.1 million in mid-2020. There are 1.4 million more
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On Monday, the United States supreme court overturned decades of precedent governing the separation of church and state, and achieved one of the most long-standing goals of the Christian right: the return of official Christian prayer to public schools. Kennedy v Bremerton School District had a strange path to the supreme court. Initially filed in 2015, the case concerns Joseph Kennedy, formerly a public high school football coach from a Seattle suburb, who sued the community that used to employ him for religious discrimination after the school objected to his habit of making public, ostentatious Christian prayers on the 50 yard line at football games, surrounded by young athletes. Kennedy has lost at the district and circuit levels; he moved to Florida in 2019, which technically should hav
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Early this morning, a small NASA spacecraft about the size of a microwave embarked on the beginning of a four-month-long journey to the Moon, where it will eventually insert itself into a unique, elongated lunar orbit that no NASA mission has visited before. The spacecraft’s goal is simple: test out this particular orbit and see what it’s like. That’s because it’s the same orbit that lunar-bound astronauts could use in the coming decade. This distinctive orbit is called “near rectilinear halo orbit,” or NRHO for short. It’s a special seven-day path that spacecraft can take around the Moon, bringing vehicles relatively close to the lunar surface for one day before they swing out far from the Moon for the other six. NASA is considering leveraging this orbit for its Artemis p
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With Roe v Wade overturned by the US supreme court and American women now living in a nation where our most fundamental rights are dependent on the state in which we reside, a lot of us are looking around and asking, “how did we get here?”There is much blame to go around, and the bulk of it rests on the shoulders of the right-wing anti-abortion movement that sprung out of the white supremacist movement that fought to maintain Jim Crow and school segregation. The racist, misogynist Religious Right gained tremendous power within the Republican party; the Republican party proved itself willing to lie, cheat, and steal to get their way; and as a result, Americans are now living in an undemocratic nation of reactionary minority rule.But the Democratic party hasn’t done enough to help itse
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The beauty of passwordless authentication is that the most difficult part of migrating user tables is eliminated; the migration of passwords. This makes switching authentication providers extremely easy if the new API provider is a passwordless authentication provider.‍For the purposes of this post, we will take Email Magic Links as the form of passwordless authentication that we speak about.‍Email Magic Links are defined as a “single-use URL sent to the user’s email that authenticates the user instantly when clicked”.Password-based Migration‍Traditionally, there would be two ways in which to migrate user tables.‍On-Demand Migration‍‍This is where users are migrated dynamically to the new auth provider as the users login.‍Bulk Migration‍This is where an IT admin would
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Sony, Nintendo, Activision, Take-Two will skip event. Ubisoft has said it will attend Gamescom 2022 - a show many other companies have said they will skip. A brief message posted to Ubisoft's Twitter last night revealed the publisher would be present at this August's Cologne-based convention, though did not detail what games might be on offer. Ubisoft's decision comes after the recent pull-outs from Sony, Nintendo, Activision Blizzard and Take-Two, which have all chosen not to attend. Microsoft has yet to make an announcement - though it's unclear what it might bring. Eurogamer Newscast: What can Sony do to improve PlayStation Plus Premium? Pre-pandemic, Gamescom was the world's largest games s
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The tide is seemingly turning against Meta, Google and other tech giants. Groundbreaking new European Union legislation is imminent, aimed at forcing the large digital platforms to do more to keep users safe and cutting down market abuses, data capture and surveillance infrastructure. As the Digital Services Act package was being finalised, the very public crossing of swords between Elon Musk and the European Commission over Twitter captured headlines. Yet the Musk spectacle was a sideshow.Much more urgently in need of scrutiny is big tech’s hidden lobbying against the DSA. It is unlikely that Brussels has previously seen campaigns on such a scale and practices so out of line with the requirements of a democratic, open society.The DSA will be rubber-stamped by the European parliament next week. When it finally comes into force this year, it will allow Europe for the first time to neutralise some of the harms caused by social media platforms. But the compromises made in getting here also reflect the extraordinary power of tech companies to influence decision-making, and by extension to subvert our democracies.We learned from big tobacco how outsized interests create entire ecosystems to influence and manipulate both civil society and policymakers. Based on my experience of and encounters with the big tech platforms from inside the EU over 12 years, I have formed the view that the Brussels policy community has been, and still insidiously is, in the grip of this corporate class – the biggest the world has ever seen.European competition law was supposedly big tech’s greatest fear. But it has patently been either too weak or too ineffectively applied to rein in the Silic
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Many American women in recent days have deleted period tracking apps from their cellphones, amid fears the data collected by the apps could be used against them in future criminal cases in states where abortion has become illegal.The trend already started last month when a draft supreme court opinion that suggested the court was set to overturn Roe v Wade was leaked, and has only intensified since the court on Friday revoked the federal right to abortionThese concerns are not baseless. As with various other apps, cycle trackers collect, retain and at times share some of their users’ data. In a state where abortion is a crime, prosecutors could request information collected by these apps when building a case against someone. “If they are trying to prosecute a woman for getting an illegal abortion, they can subpoena any app on their device, including period trackers,” said Sara Spector, a Texas-based criminal defense attorney, and ex-prosecutor.“But every company has their individual storage and privacy policy about how they use and how long they store data,” Spector added.Cycle trackers are popular for a reason. Nearly a third of American women have been using them, according to a 2019 survey published by the Kaiser Family Foundation. They have helped make women’s lives easier in many ways, from family planning and detecting early signs of health issues to choosing the perfect time for a holiday.A 2019 study published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) found that 79% of health apps available through the Google Play store that were related to medicine, including apps that help manage drugs, adherence, medicines, or prescribing information, regularly shared use
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Lhakpa Sherpa – the female world record-holder for Everest summits – uses a 50-year-old oxygen mask. She has no regular sponsors, no trainers or dietitians.She works an hourly job at Whole Foods in Connecticut, and raised three children nearly on her own while navigating poverty and domestic abuse.Her resolve is legendary. Or more accurately, it should be.Lhakpa Sherpa reached out to me on 1 April 2022, five days before she was due to get on the plane to attempt her record-breaking 10th summit of Mount Everest. “I’m definitely excited to go back to Everest,” she told me, through her daughter Shiny, a bright and personable teenager who handles her mother’s communications. “Of course a part of me is scared – Everest is dangerous.”Lhakpa Sherpa on her 10th climb, wearing outdated equipment. Photograph: Lhakpa SherpaLhakpa, Shiny and I last hiked together outside West Hartford, Connecticut, in October 2019, unaware that a global pandemic was weeks away and would defer her dreams for a 10th summit. She was training for a season that ultimately wouldn’t come.Finally, travel to Everest became possible again for Lhakpa. “I’ve been trying to go on this trip for years,” she said in April. “But Covid delayed everything. It’s been tough the last few years. I worked in a grocery store throughout the pandemic. My children would do school online. My father passed away and my daughter’s father also passed away. We’re just happy to be healthy and alive.”Lhakpa Sherpa is 48 years old. The years lost to the pandemic were crucial years in the climbing life of an elite athlete. Still, people regularly summit Everest in their 50s and beyond, and it is not unthinkable for her to attempt another climb. (Yuichiro Miura, a Japanese mountaineer, summited at ages 70, 75, and 80.)“It was frustrating having my climb get delayed multiple years in a row,” she said. “However, I knew one day I would get the chance to go again.”Lhakpa is a naturally strong athlete, but because she is unsponsored and a single mom working an hourly job at Whole Foods, each summit attempt presents a significant physical and financial risk. She has very little time to train
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Plus watch a charity livestream of the game today. Free in-game Pride items will be included in Two Point Campus when it releases on 9th August. The item pack will include rainbow coloured items like rugs, bedding, flags and more, and will be free forever across all platforms. In addition, Sega and Two Point Studios will today host a Twitch livestream of the game to raise awareness and funds for Mermaids - a charity supporting trans youth and their families. Relationships between students will be a key feature of the new game, which can be accelerated using love items like the love bench and, erm, love trumpet. Pride items in Two Point Campus "Two Point Studios believes in 'love is love', which means that in Two Point Campus any student can form a romantic relationship with any other student," reads a press release sent to Eurogamer. "In supporting all your students' social needs, you can watch friendships form and romance blossom with whomever your students choose, creating a happy and harmonious campus for all to enjoy." For more on Two Point Campus, check out our preview of the game and interview with game director Gary Carr and senior producer Jo Koehler on humour and
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While Paul Solet is credited as the director, producer and co-screenwriter for this gloomy, Taxi Driver-style tale about a lonely man with lots of firearms, the film’s star Adrien Brody was the other screenwriter, another one of its producers, and even the composer of the deep register, synth-based score. So if that doesn’t make this a vanity project for Brody, then it’s at least a bit of a folie à deux, given the end result is so pretentious and derivative.At least there are a few redeeming features in the supporting cast, including, in reverse order of redemptiveness, the always welcome RZA as a gun-shop owner, Chandler DuPont as an ingenue street kid called Dianda who inspires protectiveness in Brody’s protagonist, and Hollywood’s favourite balding bad guy, Glenn Fleshler. Fleshler is always worth watching, whether he’s playing a Chechen mobster as he did in the first season of Barry, a gun-dispensing clown as he did in Joker, or Shamrayev in the latest film adaptation of The Seagull. In Clean, he gets to let rip as an outer-boroughs-accented mob boss named Michael who runs a drug-smuggling business that uses a fish shop as a front. Somehow he manages to make the growled words “clean the squid” into a terrifying command.But he’s not the main character. That would be Clean (Brody), a brooding refuse collector who works alone picking up trash and junk but has, as hinted at by his name, an impeccably tidy lifestyle. He repairs abandoned vacuum cleaners, feeds stray dogs, and makes meals for a fellow recovering addict from his 12-step group who is Dianda’s grandmother. This is because of the burden of guilt he carries for the death of his own child (Victory Brinker), whose fate we learn about in flashbacks; here, Clean is less hirsute but has a heroin problem.Clean’s usual routine of brooding, fixing things, collecting rubbish and crying is disrupted when he gets entangled in the business of Fleshler’s Michael, leading to an incredibly violent yet strangely risible climax. Apart from the occasional bit of voiceover from Clean, our hero barely says much at all, leaving it to Brody to do a lot of acting with those big sad eyes. It makes the
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Sriracha fans are a passionate bunch. They have been known to get tattoos of the popular hot sauce on their bodies and dress up like the red plastic squeeze bottle for Halloween.So it’s no surprise that an unprecedented shortage of the beloved condiment would send loyalists scrambling to avoid a spiceless summer.Huy Fong Foods, the southern California company that produces 20m bottles of sriracha annually, has experienced a low inventory of red jalapeño chilli peppers in recent years made worse by spring’s crop failure.The cause? Severe weather and drought conditions in Mexico.It’s not just chilli peppers. Mustard producers in France and Canada said extreme weather caused a 50% reduction in seed production last year, leading to a shortage of the condiment on grocery store shelves. Blistering heat, stronger storms, droughts, floods, fires and changes in rainfall patterns are also affecting the cost and availability of staples, including wheat, corn, coffee, apples, chocolate and wine. The climate crisis is increasing the intensity and frequency of extreme weather events – and it’s putting food production at risk.“Almost everything we grow and raise in the US is facing some climatic stress,” said Carolyn Dimitri, nutrition and food studies professor at NYU.Wheat and other grain crops are particularly vulnerable. In the Great Plains, where most of the US’s wheat is harvested, drought depressed the winter crop. Abandonment levels for winter wheat in the US – primarily in Texas and Oklahoma – are the highest since 2002. Meanwhile in Montana, flooding is threatening grain crops.“This becomes important because the US doesn’t have a large surplus and can’t really contribute at this exact minute to fill in the global gap in wheat supplies due to the Ukraine crisis,” said Dimitri.The impact of the climate crisis on grain crops extends beyond the US. In India, a fierce heatwave damaged the wheat crop due to record-setting temperatures throughout the spring and summer. As Delhi hit 120F in May, the government placed a ban on wheat exports, driving up prices even further than the rise following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.Climate change could
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Elligator is a way to hide a cryptographic key exchange using elliptic curves as random noise, devised by Daniel J. Bernstein, Mike Hamburg, Anna Krasnova, and Tanja Lange. When do you need Elligator? Elligator addresses a specific problem: you need to perform a cryptographic key exchange protocol, and hide the very fact that you are using cryptography. A cryptographic key exchange can happen in various forms. The most popular ones often use Diffie-Hellman key exchanges and send random public keys over the network. Problem is, random public keys are not random bytes. A passive eavesdropp
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In 2020, Airbnb introduced a temporary ban on house parties and events to better follow social distancing restrictions with the pandemic. Now, the company says it’s been so pleased by the outcome of the ban that it’s making it permanent and codifying its rules. “Over time, the party ban became much more than a public health measure,” said the company in a blog post. “It developed into a bedrock community policy to support our Hosts and their neighbors.” The ban prohibits “all disruptive parties and events,” with a particular focus on open-invite gatherings (those advertised
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The regulator Ofwat has expanded its investigation into the dumping of raw sewage to include South West Water after finding “shocking” failures in the way the majority of water companies run their waste treatment works.Ofwat said on Tuesday it had extended its inquiry after heightened concerns about South West Water’s environmental performance and suggestions it was not complying with its legal obligations.The enforcement action being taken by the regulator is part of a large inquiry into potentially illegal dumping of raw sewage by privatised water companies. Six out of nine companies – Anglian Water, Northumbrian Water, Thames Water, Wessex Water, Yorkshire Water and now South West Water – have been served formal notices to gather further information for enforcement purposes, the regulator said.In 2020 the Guardian revealed that water firms had discharged raw sewage into England’s rivers 200,000 times the previous year. And in 2021 Ofwat and the Environment Agency announced an investigation into potentially illegal dumping of raw sewage into rivers and coastal waters by water companies.The inquiry began after water companies admitted they may have illegally released untreated human effluent into rivers and waterways.Water companies are allowed to self-report breaches of permits that allow them to release raw sewage in exceptional circumstances via storm overflows.The six companies are being investigated because of concerns they have a significant number of wastewater treatment works that may not be compliant with the permits – and are therefore dumping sewage potentially illegally – as well as concerns about how each company manages its compliance with its environmental obligations and whether it has provided the information required to the regulator or withheld data.David Black, Ofwat’s chief executive, said: “As we gather and analyse more information, including data on storm overflow spills, our concerns have grown further about South West Water’s operation of its wastewater assets and environmental performance. As a result, we have opened an additional enforcement case into South West Water.“We have now opened enforcement cases against the majority of wastewater companies in England and Wales. From what we have seen so far, the scale of the issue here is shocking – companies must resolve any problems at wastewater treatment wor
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In July 1996, I climbed onto my muddy pony in our small farm in County Armagh and headed down the road. It was a rare sunny and warm day in Northern Ireland. I didn’t get far before I was blocked by a large tree that had been felled over my path. A farmer living nearby had taken his chainsaw and cut it down, closing the rural road in protest.That summer, men fiercely attached to unity with Britain undertook similar action across Northern Ireland, cutting down trees and forming barricades on highways. These men, belonging to the Orange Order—a society that commemorates the battlefield victories of the Protestant Dutch nobleman William of Orange over the Catholic King James II 300 years prior—had been prevented by the police and local residents for the second year running from marching with banners and bands through a predominantly Catholic neighborhood of a nearby town.My family lived near the last ardently Protestant village before the green hills rolled south, becoming wilder and more heathered, eventually leading to Irish Republican Army strongholds that straddled the border between Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom, and the Republic of Ireland, a separate country. The Orangemen would not dare go down there to shut roads, so they closed the roads leading to our village. That summer, I asked myself the same question I’m sure many in my Protestant community did privately: If the Orangemen were angry with Catholics, why did they block the roads in Protestant areas?To the outside world, and the American TV cameras that arrived in Northern Ireland that summer to cover the standoff, social breakdown over the Orangemen’s march route likely seemed arcane.
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Inflation is surging, a recession is looming, the culture war is raging, Republican gains in Congress are surely coming, and Joe Biden’s poll numbers are slumping.The Biden presidency began with Plan A: campaign from the center, govern from the left. That plan has now exhausted whatever potential it had. On his present course, President Biden is in danger of being remembered as the intermission between Act I and Act II of the collapse of American democracy.Biden needs a Plan B, fast.What would a Plan B look like? It should be built on five pillars:Pillar One: Combat inflation. Nothing is more devastating to incumbent presidents than inflation. Of those in office during the age of stagflation, one resigned (Richard Nixon); the other two both faced devastating primary challenges and then were defeated in their bids for a second term (Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter). The story can be told in greater detail, but the pattern is the pattern.Most of the fight against inflation will be directed from the Federal Reserve, over which a president has no control, but there are things that Biden can do. He can put a stop to the infantile refrain from some in his party that inflation is being driven by price gouging by meatpackers and oil companies. The Democrats’ progressive base may enjoy the corporation-bashing, but it’s an insult to everyone else’s intelligence. And because it is nonsense, it will not deliver results.On the affirmative side, Biden can undo Trump’s tariffs and je
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Glen Schofield is feeling relaxed. It’s been, you sense, a whirlwind few weeks for the Dead Space creator, his new team having finally put out the first glimpse at its stylish, slick and incredibly gory space horror Calisto Protocol at Geoff Keighley’s Summer Games Fest - a reveal that marks a significant milestone in a project spun up some three years ago alongside new studio Striking Distance. "It feels like freedom," Schofield says as we chat in the sun in an annex to Summer Games Fest's LA venue. "It always feels that way, but somehow this one was more cooped up for longer. I'm kind of used to it because Call of Duty always made you keep your mouth shut, but this one felt longer." Put some of that down, perhaps, to the challenges of working through the pandemic - challenges that Striking Distance had to adapt to just as it was spinning up development. "We were about 50 people or so when we moved into our brand new spot," Schofield says of the studio's headquarters in California's San Ramon valley. "We'd been working on it for six months: designers, artists, architects, you know, everybody. Nine days later we got kicked out." The Schofield cut of the most recent trailer for The Callisto Protocol is where you'll find a fair representation of how much *ick* to expect in the final thing. It feels like a small miracle that The Callisto Protocol is on track to make its release date later this December, something Schofield never really doubted. "We never really picked the day," he says. "We just said 2022. Luckily, we were kind of open because it's a new engine, a new team, new studio and a new IP in the middle of a pandemic. It's hard to put a precise date on that." As to the genesis of the The Callisto Protocol, it's something that came as Schofield was taking a break from his previous studio Sledgehammer, where he'd overseen the likes of Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare and WW2. "Activision, nicely, was paying me but I took a year off. It's time to say thank you and relax from here. So I took a month off! I went down to Tucson to a spa - I’d done that after a couple of games, I take like 10 days by myself to go relax. "So I went down there and I decided that I was going to draw out in the desert. I would go out in the desert - much to their chagrin - and just sit and draw. And at the same time I'm coming up with ideas. Some of them I would just focus on from day to day and then they'd get bigger and bigger. After a few weeks, I had seven, eight, nine, ideas. And this was one - it wasn't called The Callisto Protocol, I called it Meteor Down. It had gotten pretty big, you know, with pages and pages of stories and stuff." The Dead Space remake is coming out mere weeks after The Callisto Protocol - and it's not hard to spot similarities between the two. "I knew that I wanted to come back to do this sort of thing. I just put it together, did a presentation, wrote more about it and filled in some of the holes. When I went out looking for a new studio, at the same time I sold the studio idea I had a business plan, and I had a creative plan and the two came together. One did not come without the othe
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Fracking companies are likely to be eligible for tax breaks, potentially worth billions, that the government is extending to oil and gas companies to encourage new exploration of fossil fuel resources.Combined with high gas prices, the extra funding – which amounts to a subsidy, according to campaigners – could provide a strong incentive to restart fracking operations if a moratorium in the UK is lifted, which could happen as early as this week.Oil and gas companies will benefit, potentially to the tune of £4bn, from a loophole in the government’s windfall tax, which allows exemptions for companies that invest in the exploitation of new fossil fuel resources. Legal advice provided to the campaigning group Uplift suggests fracking companies would also be eligible for this incentive, as the windfall tax – officially known as the energy profits levy – is currently written.Tessa Khan, director of the campaign group Uplift, said: “Despite a historic cost of living crisis, the government is trying to rush through yet another massive subsidy for oil and gas companies. The energy levy is supposed to ease the burden of rising energy bills for UK households, but this investment loophole allows companies to slash their tax bill if they build more polluting, unsustainable oil and gas projects.“It is outrageous that fracking companies may be able to benefit from this subsidy, when fracking – like all oil and gas drilling – does nothing to ensure safe affordable energy for people in the UK.”The Labour party said the loophole meant oil and gas companies would receive 20 times more in taxpayer incentives than renewable energy companies are eligible for. Analysis by Labour of government data shows that about £4bn could flow to oil and gas companies under the loophole in the windfall tax, and “super-deduction” tax credits.According to Labour’s analysis, the new rules mean that for every £100 an oil and gas company invests in the North Sea, the company receives £91.50 from the taxpayer. For every £100 invested in renewable energy, the renewables company receives £25, but that will fall to £4.50 from April 2023.If these incentives are extended to frackers, it could be enough to swing the economics of fracking in favour of new operations. Labour told the Guardian that for fracking companies the rules would mean that out of every £100 spent on fracking only £7.50 would be paid by the fracker, with the rest made up for by the taxpayer.Ministers will face key choices this week over whether to lift the moratorium on fracking, as the British Geological Survey has been asked to produce a report on the fracking potential in the UK, which is due by Thursday. Many on the right of the Tory party have vocally supported fracking, and Boris Johnson is seeking their support to bolster his ailing premiership, weakened by two byelection defeats.Khan said: “How can the government justify effectively picking up the bill for new oil and gas projects when these industries are making record profits and destroying the climate? The simple answer is that it cannot.”Ed Miliband, the shadow business secretary, said: “It is shameful that the governm
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Uber’s plan to electrify its driver fleet by 2030 seems to be off to a good start. The ride-hailing company announced today that over 15,000 Uber drivers have signed on to rent Tesla vehicles through its partnership with car rental company Hertz. Uber claims the deal is its “largest-ever expansion” of EVs on a mobility platform in North America and that there have already been more than 5 million Tesla rides driving over 40 million miles since the program started last year. The popularity and demand for electric vehicles are at an all-time high for consumers, especially with the increased cost of gas. The same is true for Uber drivers, who are responsible for the costs associated wi
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. "Trees fall in the forest and make sounds."
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Valve will up the pace and ship more than twice as many Steam Decks in the coming months compared to last quarter. "Hello! Some great news on the production front. We just sent the last batch of Q2 emails, and we'll start sending Q3 reservation emails on the 30th," the company announced. "Production has picked up, and after today we'll be shipping more than double the number of Steam Decks every week!" The Eurogamer Newscast chat all things not-E3-but-sort-of, including PC gaming show. This is great news for the many still waiting to get their hands on Valve's coveted portable PC, but the company has asked that we all practice
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For years, Republicans who wanted to ban abortion said they supported exceptions for rape, incest and the health of the mother. Even the Hyde Amendment, which prohibits government programs, such as Me
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As the culture reckons with the ills of the ’80s and ’90s, much of the focus has been on how both the public and the media treated white American female stars like Britney Spears. That’s a necessary conversation, but there’s a parallel discussion we haven’t really had ― about the ways in which we participated in, rubber-stamped and effectively overlooked the exploitative nature of boy bands, particularly those whose members didn’t primarily speak English.That makes watching HBO Max’s “Menudo: Forever Young” a sobering experience. The docuseries compels you to understand how one of the most beloved boy bands ever, made up of preteen and teenage boys from Puerto Rico, was commodified for our consumption and enjoyment. It does this unapologetically and, especially in the beginning, largely in Spanish.“Not like we cared,” co-director Kristopher Ríos told HuffPost ― though he admitted he had some anxiety about how audiences would receive the series, partly because it’s in both Spanish and English. “I mean, we first and foremost made this for Puerto Ricans. But you want a wider audience to see this.”It’s actually imperative that we do. As you process each segment ― there are four parts to the series, each one about an hour ― you begin to realize the parallels to our relationships with all boy bands across history and language, from the Jackson 5 and ’N Sync to BTS.Ríos believes that the obsession with the business of male youth and talent began with Menudo. “It is the first time in which the industry realizes this is a way for us to maximize profit from five boys,” he said. “Menudo is the first to show the world [that] this is how you make a lot of money off of five young men. We’re really analyzing the way in which the industry exploits boys for profit.”In 1983, Geraldo Rivera traveled to Puerto Rico to interview Menudo, the Puerto Rican group formed in the 1970s that was one of the biggest Latin boy bands in history.ABC News via Getty ImagesThat means telling the full story of Menudo, as few have ever bothered to do. Most of the band’s superfans could probably recite the press-release version of their story by heart: Edgardo Díaz created the band in the ’70s in Puerto Rico. They earned international adoration with hits like “Los Fantasmas” in the early ’80s, which helped solidify their status as teen idols in both their native island and the United States throughout the early 2000s. Even if you didn’t have “Menuditis” ― a word that stans came up with to describe their love for five of the most recognizable boys in the world ― Menudo was impossible to ignore completely.Ríos was born in New York and moved to Puerto Rico when he was 4. He lived there until he was 14. He knew Menudo’s songs, and who they were. “I remember when I was a kid, you go to birthday parties and they give you the little Menudo vanity mirror and fanny pack and the Menudo notebook and that kind of stuff,” he recalled. “I think I might have even had a Menudo T-shirt.” That’s the narrative that everyone knew, even if they were only marginally aware of Menudo — and if you were a fan of any bo
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Here. We. Go. Right then. Clouds overhead. Dramatic music from the speakers. A stacked slip cordon and wouldn’t you know it, Marizanne Kapp with the new Dukes in her hand. get comfy. This should be a good ‘un.“Good morning Dan”Hi Jerry in Cape Town, hope it’s as gorgeous as always!“We agree fully that yesterday was an exemplary day’s cricket, really riveting stuff in all departments. The Duke ball is a bugger though, and we are holding thumbs the SA bowlers, without Ismael and Kaka can do the same kind of damage. Hoping also the weather holds.”Will be interesting to see how the
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Heather Watson will be back on Court 1 later but not until after Matteo Berrettini’s match. Watson lost the first set to the world No 110 Tamara Korpatsch on a tiebreak yesterday, having been 5-1 up, but rallied to win the second set 7-5. They will be back to play the third and final set.Here, if you missed any of them, are a few of the pieces we’ve recently published from Wimbledon:“For Anhelina Kalinina, a 4-6, 6-2, 6-4 winner over Anna Bondar on Monday, the £78,000 she is guaranteed for reaching round two will go toward helping her family rebuild their home in Ukraine, which, she rev
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It had been a long time since Bookmarks, a nonprofit literary arts organization, was able to hold its normal programming in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. But as the staff began to feel more comfortable holding events during the coronavirus pandemic, they planned a Drag Queen Story Hour for last weekend. It was nothing particularly new, and they had hosted one before the pandemic, too. But what was supposed to be a way for children to learn and have some fun turned into an opportunity for conservative protesters to lob false, hurtful and dangerous accusations.A handful of protesters came out to Bookmarks, and while they were met with a much larger counter-protest, the nonprofit organization also received phone calls and emails from angry conservatives.“It’s just shocking to us the level of hatred we received,” Jamie Rogers Southern, the executive director of Bookmarks, told HuffPost. “It was an emotional week for us.”Southern said most of the callers were badly confused about drag shows. “A lot of it is unfortunately misguided and ill-informed statements about how drag queens were pornography or a strip show,” she said. The protesters were fully convinced that this was a publicly funded event, she said, and believed that kids would “become” transgender just from looking at a drag queen. (No tax dollars were used.)Bookmarks is not alone. Earlier this month, a drag queen story time in California was interrupted by the Proud Boys, an extremist hate group. Members of the group stormed the event and yelled homophobic and transphobic slurs. And Last weekend, members of the Proud Boys protested a drag queen story time at a library in Nevada. Parents and children ran into the building after a man allegedly pulled out a gun. The sudden backlash to previously uncontroversial events didn’t come out of nowhere. In the last few months, the conservative movement has doubled down on its attacks on queer people. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) revoked Disney World’s special tax status after the corporation released a statement in opposition to the state’s “Don’t Say Gay” bill, which is now law and restricts Florida teachers from talking about sexual orientation and gender in the classroom. In Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott (R) ordered the state’s child protective services to investigate the parents of transgender children, claiming that getting their children’s gender-affirming care is tantamount to abuse. Republican leaders and activists are cloaking their homophobia and transphobia in concern for children. But behind every “Won’t somebody think of the kids?” wail is the real motivation: the desire to control and enforce strict gender roles.And family drag shows are the new catnip for this ultra-regressive movement. “Republican leaders and activists are cloaking their homophobia and transphobia in concern for children. But behind every “Won’t somebody think of the kids?” wail is the real motivation: the desire to control and enforce strict gender roles.”The protest in Winston-Salem came just weeks after a video of a similar confrontation in Dallas went viral.In the video, drag queens could be seen leading a group of
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It’s likely you’ve never heard of ​​acrochordons, but you’ve probably dealt with them. In fact, they’re so common that over 50% of adults will experience them at least once in their lifetime. Better known as skin tags, acrochordons are small growths of extra skin that, while harmless, are no one’s favorite feature.Health care costs are higher than ever and skin tag removal typically isn’t covered by insurance, since it’s an unnecessary procedure. These days, there are a wide array of skin tag removal products you can purchase to cut these costs considerably ― but, ew? Is that such a great idea? Just how safe are these treatments, and is skin tag removal better left to the professionals? Doctors’ Thoughts On At-Home Skin Tag Removal May Surprise You“Do you need to go to your doctor every time you have a skin tag you want removed? Not always,” said Dr. Jaimie DeRosa, a board-certified facial plastic surgeon and founder of DeRosa Center Plastic Surgery & Med Spa in Boston. “When I was little, I remember my dad (who was a doctor) pulling his skin tags and snipping them off.” Thankfully, there are less extreme at-home treatment options today. While none of the medical professionals loved the idea of at-home skin tag removal, they did have some safer at-home ideas to try. However, there was one caveat. “If the lesion is large or is causing pain, bleeding or discomfort, it should be removed by a health care provider. When in doubt, please see your physician,” said Dr. Alexander Zuriarrain, a board-certified plastic surgeon with Zuri Plastic Surgery in Miami.Catherine Falls Commercial via Getty ImagesFor a metaphorical idea of what skin tags look like, think about the growths on these potatoes.If these characteristics do not apply to your skin tags, then you can consider trying these DIY recommendations below.The Household Remedies That People Often TryFirst, let’s address some of the household remedies that your friends may have suggested to you. While the ones listed here are safe to try, keep in mind there are no studies that prove they actually work.“A natural remedy that a patient introduced to me is using banana peel on skin tags. It is unknown what chemicals are in the banana peel that helps with skin tags,” said Dr. Elaine F. Kung, a board-certified dermatologist based out of New York City and founder of Future Bright Dermatology. “It has been postulated that there are antioxidants and enzymes that may be helpful.”Nandi Wagner, the lead esthetician at Gilded Ritual, a high-end salon in New York City, is familiar with this method, too. “Some homeopathic remedies for skin tags include applying small amounts of diluted tea tree oil, apple cider vinegar or even banana peels to the skin tag,” Wagner said. DeRosa had similar advice and also suggested crushed garlic may work. She explained how to try this remedy at home: “For any of these topical treatments, wash the skin tag and surrounding area, then apply the topical of your choice to the tag, and cover with a bandage overnight. Repeat this treatment until the skin tag dries out and falls off, and stop its use if the area becomes irritated.”But
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At this point, it doesn’t really make sense to call the influx of true crime-related pop culture a “wave” because a wave would imply a rise and fall. Instead, the genre is now so firmly planted into our cultural landscape that the quantity of true crime series and their influence show no signs of cresting. Still, the recent glut of true crime prestige limited series, including FX’s “Under the Banner of Heaven,” Hulu’s “Candy” and HBO Max’s “The Staircase,” felt like a bridge too far. Even I, a person whose job involves watching a lot of TV and making sense of it, gave up trying to keep up. Given the sheer amount of TV, for each one of these shows I managed to watch, there was probably another one I missed. (Also, too many shows premiered recently in order to compete in the very crowded limited series categories during this Emmys season.) Like this spring’s boom in prestige limited series about shady tech startups, these dramatizations seem superfluous, even when they’re well crafted. We know how the story goes. Someone (usually a white woman) is murdered, leaving a family or a community shaken. Maybe there’s a shoddy investigation, a questionable trial and sensationalist news coverage. Sometimes, revisiting these stories in different formats can prompt something new, like societal reevaluations or unexpected developments years later, such as reopening the case or exonerating someone wrongfully convicted for the crime. But the prestige limited series model is particularly superfluous because these shows are often retelling stories based on previous fact-based material, like books, documentaries and news articles. Therefore, there’s a higher bar to clear in justifying them. Why retell this story, and why now? What do we gain from doing it?One approach is to make the show a meta-commentary on the true crime genre itself, which is at the core of “The Staircase,” a dramatization of the docuseries of the same name. Starring Colin Firth as Michael Peterson, who was convicted in the 2001 murder of his wife Kathleen (played in the series by Toni Collette), the show uses several mechanisms to deconstruct elements of the true crime genre and its appeal, such as the voyeurism and lurid fascination. For instance, the original documentarian, Jean-Xavier de Lestrade, and his crew are characters in the limited series, showing how they filmed and edited their docuseries. (In real life, de Lestrade has said he feels “betrayed” by the limited series’ creator Antonio Campos and the way the documentary team is depicted.)Colin Firth as Michael Peterson and Vincent Vermignon as documentarian Jean-Xavier de Lestrade in HBO Max's "The Staircase."HBO MaxAmong the most discussed elements of “The Staircase” has been its unsettling reenactments of the theories behind Kathleen’s death, depicting the sense of intrigue and speculation when there are varying theories in a true crime story. Still, it’s a lot to sit through and tough to stomach, even when the luridness is the point.Instead, I found it more intriguing to view “The Staircase” as a family drama. We see how the legal proceedings, the docuseries and the public a
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This is part of This Made Me, a HuffPost series paying tribute to the formative pop culture in our lives. Read more stories from the series here.I’ve been a die-hard fan of many things in my life, but nothing comes close to my love of “Jennifer’s Body.” I’ve seen the film countless times — both with and without the special DVD commentary tracks — and yammered on about it all over the internet. I even have a “Jennifer’s Body” tattoo. (The other day, a guy on my street asked me who was inked on the back of my leg. To keep things brief I just said, “Megan Fox.”)“Jennifer’s Body,” which I first watched at 16, follows the codependent friendship between Needy, a mousy
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Q3 reservations will become available from th
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Royal Mail workers have begun voting on whether to walk out in a dispute over salary rises that could become the biggest strike this summer, while tram drivers have begun a 48-hour strike in south London in a separate row over pay.About 115,000 members of the Communication Workers Union (CWU) have received ballot papers and will vote in the coming weeks on whether to stage a campaign of industrial action. The result of the vote is expected on 19 July.The union said it could be “the biggest strike” in what is shaping up to be a summer of discontent, as thousands of workers from different industries walk out to demand pay awards that keep up with soaring inflation. Rail workers staged thre
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WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook and Instagram have begun promptly removing posts that offer abortion pills to women who may not be able to access them following a Supreme Court decision that stripped awa
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Britain’s foreign policy is now at the mercy of Boris Johnson’s reckless quest for survival. At home he grasps for votes with Irish border controls, protectionist tariffs and immigrant quotas. Abroad, he tours Europe demanding total victory in someone else’s war while promoting the most intense economic disruption in the continent’s peacetime history. Every visit is treated as a photo opportunity. An absurd “bromance” is even staged with the equally embattled French leader, Emmanuel Macron. Never was machismo so synthetic.Yesterday’s Commons vote on a bill which would allow him to scrap the Northern Ireland protocol was a classic. It was motivated by a desire to appease the province’s fast-disintegrating Unionist majority. The price is to be a predictable stand-up row with the EU, but one that Johnson thinks will bolster him with his party’s Brexiter right wing. The government’s suggestions for a “soft” border with Ireland are actually quite sensible. But Downing Street’s three years of anti-EU rhetoric have exhausted any wish in Brussels to be co-operative.The Brexit cry that “Europe needs us more than we need it” was never emptier. Johnson last night had his own backbenchers, including his predecessor Theresa May, dismissing his Northern Ireland policy as illegal, unattainable and damaging to Britain’s global reputation. At the very moment when he is wandering Europe’s capitals demanding they all refuse to trade with Russia, he is fashioning a trade war with the EU. This must be madness. Theresa May: Northern Ireland protocol bill will ‘diminish UK in eyes of the world’ – videoAs if two trade wars were not enough, Johnson is also set on another. Trade with the “rest of the world” was predicted as set to boom as a result of Brexit liberation. Now the prime minister wants to embed protectionism with tariffs on steel imports from China, India, Turkey and other countries. These are precisely the countries with which Johnson boasted he would do “world-beating trade deals”. The World Trade Organisation has warned that such action would be illegal, while Downing Street’s ethics adviser, Lord Geidt, said he was put in
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In parts of La Paz, every surface is papered with layers of bleached and peeling posters: adverts for events, jobs, apartments – and missing women.In 2021, there were at least 108 femicides in Bolivia, among the highest rates in South America. Many of the perpetrators are either never caught, not punished or go free soon after.In January, fresh outrage was prompted by the case of Richard Choque, a serial rapist and murderer who was given house arrest and then continued to commit crimes. The wave of fury prompted by the scandal has since driven Bolivia’s feminist collectives to spectacular measures in an effort to force government action against femicides – and the corrupt justice system that allows them.It started with perhaps the biggest feminist protest seen in El Alto, the one-time satellite city that now flows into La Paz. The march began outside Choque’s house in El Alto and culminated at the courts of justice, where activists covered the walls with graffiti, red paint and the names of unpunished rapists and murderers.“We wanted to redirect the discourse,” said María Galindo, founder of Mujeres Creando, a feminist collective in La Paz. “For it not to be a discourse of victimhood, nor a tabloid nor a police discourse. Because what Richard Choque shows is that t
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Interview NASA has set late August as the launch window for its much-delayed Artemis I rocket. Already perched atop the booster is the first flight-ready European Service Module (ESM). Five more are in the pipeline. Airbus industrial manager Siân Cleaver, whom The Register met at the Goodwood Festival of Speed's Future Lab, has the task of managing the assembly of the spacecraft, which will provide propulsion, power, water, oxygen and nitrogen for the Orion capsule. Looking for all the world like an evolution of the European Space Agency's (ESA) International Space Station (ISS) ATV freighter, the ESM is not pressurized and measures approximately 4 meters in length, including the Orbital Maneuvering System Engine (OMSE), which protrudes from the base. The OMSE will also look a little familiar: "We've taken those directly from old Space Shuttles", Cleaver told us, which makes for a pleasing symmetry considering the mission. NASA's Psyche mission: 2022 launch is off after software arrives late Whatever hit the Moon in March, it left this weird double crater NASA wants nuclear reactor on the Moon by 2030 Mars Express orbiter to get code update after 19 years The Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering System has Apollo Service Module heritage and while those used by the EMS won't be returning to Earth, the technology is well proven. Sadly, old Space Shuttle bits are a limited commodity. "We will fly those up to ESM-6," said Cleaver, "beyond that we're starting to think about using a new engine that's developed on the basis of this one." At present Airbus is contracted to build six ESMs. The first is waiting for that first, uncrewed, launch. The second is already in Florida, awaiting integration with the next Artemis rocket and the third, which could well play host to the first astronauts to set foot on the Moon since the days of Apollo, is coming together in Bremen, Germany. The first batch of ESMs have evolved as work has progressed. Lessons learned from ESM-1 filter down into ESM-2 and so on (and doubtless whatever is learned from that critical first test flight will also be stirred into the pot.) "There were a lot of changes betwee
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Two days after burying her mother’s ashes in the summer of 2008, Liz McGregor received a devastating phone call. Her 79-year-old father, Robin, was also dead – and his house 75 miles north of Cape Town, where she lived, was now the scene of a murder inquiry. His car, a bronze-coloured Mercedes that had for years been his pride and joy, had been discovered by police a few miles away in a poor neighbourhood with its lights on. A man was arrested as he tried to run away and officers found blood on his clothes. In the house itself there were no fingerprints, because whoever had murdered Robin McGregor had been wearing gloves.So began a story that brings McGregor face to face with South Africa’s brutal history and the violence it has spawned. Her new book, Unforgiven: Face to Face with My Father’s Killer, is so unflinching that it challenges its readers to look away first: it’s her way of processing the horror, she says. “It changed me fundamentally. When you get such a profound shock, you rethink everything. I’ve always lived my life afraid of what might happen, and when this earthquake happens, at the start you become slightly numb, then you become grief-stricken and terrified and angry, and gradually you become slightly more inured to things.”At the trial of the man who was charged with her father’s murder, McGregor and her four siblings listened as the gruesome details emerged over many weeks. “I am a journalist,” she writes. “I have covered murder trials in this very court. I have interviewed victims of violence and done my best to enter imaginatively into their experience to properly convey their pain. But none of it prepared me for the horror of sitting in this stuffy courtroom, day after day, while details of the brutality inflicted on someone with whom I was so intimately connected are revealed in torturous detail.”Her father was a retired publisher and game farmer, the former mayor of a town in the mountains of the Western Cape that was coincidentally called McGregor. He had become a bit of a celebrity in his younger days after publishing a bestselling book exposing the grotesque monopolistic corruption of apartheid, and was reward
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A Russian missile hit a crowded shopping centre in the central Ukrainian city of Kremenchuk on Monday, killing and injuring scores of people, Ukrainian authorities said. Ukraine’s president, Volodoymyr Zelenskiy, said more than 1,000 people were inside the building at the time of the strike. Images from the scene showed giant plumes of black smoke and flames, with emergency crews rushing in to search for victims and put out fires. Leaders around the world have denounced Russia’s deadly strike as 'abominable' and a war crime. Russia claims, without evidence, that it targetted weapons located next to the mall Russia-Ukraine war: latest updates World leaders condemn ‘abo
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Fears over police violence and attacks by anti-abortion activists have been growing following a wave of incidents at demonstrations against the US supreme court’s decision to overturn Roe v Wade, which upheld the constitutional right to an abortion.Across the country, hundreds of thousands of people have gathered at protests objecting to the ruling. The protests have been overwhelmingly peaceful but some have seen incidents of police violence – including attacks on protesters – and an incident of a car driving dangerously through marchers.Law enforcement cracked down on protests in multiple states, wielding batons and forcibly removing protesters from public spaces and firing teargas in Arizona.Over two dozen pro-choice activists were arrested in New York City as protests took place
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Hello! Once again, Eurogamer is marking Pride with a week of features celebrating the intersection of queer culture and gaming. Today, Ed Nightingale speaks to Emi "Captain Fluke" - esports' most prominent trans caster - about the past, present, and future of LGBTQ+ representation in the industry. "If I can use the position that I'm in from the sort of privileges that I've been gifted here in esports world, then I need to make sure that I can leave it better than I came in, and then I can leave it happy with what I've done." Emi "Captain Fluke" is an esports caster covering Rainbow Six: Siege and Valorant. In fact, she became the first openly trans caster of an esports major, a trailblazing position that's come with ups and downs. She began by experimenting with games and content on YouTube. As she always enjoyed talking over games, she tested out some commentating with friends. Over time those streams got noticed and she was eventually offered paid work, leading her to become a full-time esports caster. A lot of that passion was tied to Siege. "Siege was a game that I fell in love with," she says. "I think it scratched that itch in my brain wher
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FOSS Fest There are still ways to run DOS apps under 64-bit Windows and Linux, and a lot of free apps to choose from. One of the differences between the Microsoft and Apple approaches to maintaining widely used OSes is that Apple is quite aggressive about removing backwards compatibility, while Microsoft tries hard to keep it. One of the few times Microsoft removed a whole compatibility layer from Windows was with the launch of 64-bit Windows, which went mainstream with Vista in 2007. 64-bit editions of Windows can't run 16-bit apps, whether they're for DOS or Windows. Enterprising developers, of course, take this kind of thing as a challenge. There are obvious ways round this, of course. You can run DOS in a virtual machine. It works fine – the problem is that it's very difficult to get anything in or out of it. Modern PCs are also so vastly more powerful than they were in DOS' heyday of the 1980s that you just run a PC emulator, such as DOSBox or the enhanced DOSBox-X. These programs emulate an entire PC, so you can run games that require long-obsolete hardware such as SoundBlaster cards. DOSBox-X even supports Windows 3.x and Win9x. The last ever version of WordPerfect, 6.2, also runs very nicely under vDosPlus But a whole-system emulator is overkill if you just want to run some DOS productivity apps. A long-standing way to just open a simple DOS prompt on a Windows 64 machine is Jos Schaars's vDos, and it too has an enhanced cousin, vDosPlus. A popular use for vDosPlus is to run the original DOS WordPerfect, as documented on Edward Mendelson's very helpful WordPerfect for DOS page. Microsoft Word 5.5 running under vDosPlus on 64-bit Wi
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ATLANTA (AP) — A man was killed and two others were injured, including rap star Ludacris’ manager, in a parking lot shooting in an upscale neighborhood north of downtown Atlanta on Sunday night.The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that the men were all taken to hospitals, where one was pronounced dead. The Fulton County Medical Examiner’s Office later identified the man as Artez Benton, 23, of Scottdale.Monday afternoon, Atlanta police confirmed one of the two injured men was Chaka Zulu, the longtime manager of rapper and actor Ludacris. The conditions of Zulu and the other man were not released.Atlanta police investigated the shooting in the 2200 block of Peachtree Road in Buckhead into the early Monday morning hours. Several restaurants and shops share the parking lot.Police Lt. Germain Dearlove told local news media that the shooting was the “result of a dispute in the parking lot.” He did not say if the three victims had visited any of the businesses before the shooting at around 11:35 p.m.Earlier Sunday, another shooting at an Atlanta sandwich shop left one employee dead and another injured after an argument over mayonnaise, police said.The shooting happened around 6:30 p.m. Sunday at a Subway restaurant attached to a gas station in downtown Atlanta. Police said the man argued with the two female workers before shooting them.“This was a very tragic situation that did not have to occur,” Atlanta police Deputy Chief Charles Hampton Jr. told reporters Mond
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Boris Johnson seems to have no qualms talking about the UK’s support for the rule of law (see 9.36am) even though last night parliament voted for the Northern Ireland protocol bill, which is widely seen as breaking international law. Our story about the vote is here.The highlight of the debate was probably the speech from Theresa May, the former Conservative prime minister, who did an effective job demolishing the government’s argument that the “doctrine of necessity” in international law makes the bill legal.The bill pased easily - by 295 votes to 221 - and none of the Conservative MP
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I use Nix a lot. Nix is a bunch of different things. It’s a programming language, designed for expressing a build pipeline. It’s a package manager. It (well, NixOS) is an operating system based on that package manager. Today I’d like to talk about the package manager. Specifically, a lovely gateway into the rest of the ecosystem, nix-shell. Some people will tell you that the point of Nix is to set up your software so it can be built with Nix, which allows you to tightly control all dependencies and emit something that is as close to reproducible as possible. I am all for this, but if we
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It hasn’t released a competitive flagship device in years, but HTC’s smartphone division isn’t throwing in the towel just yet. Today it announced the HTC Desire 22 Pro, a follow-up to last year’s HTC Desire 21 Pro, and the company’s big attempt at capitalizing on the so-called metaverse. In the UK, it’s listed at £399 and will ship on August 1st. There are a couple of different aspects to the phone’s metaverse functionality. To start with, it’s designed to be the “perfect companion” to HTC’s recently announced Vive Flow VR headset and used to access Viverse, HTC’s t
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Chris Martin delighted patrons at a rural pub on his way home from Glastonbury, playing Coldplay’s song A Sky Full of Stars on the pub’s piano.In the homely surroundings of the Stag Inn in the village of Hinton Charterhouse, north Somerset, he dedicated the performance to a couple at the pub who were planning to have the song as the first dance at their wedding.“It was one of those things where you go, ‘Right, this is happening’,” pub owner Chris Parkin told Sky News. “It was really brilliant, a brilliant moment.”Martin, who visited Glastonbury and the pub with his actor girlfriend (and rumoured fiancee) Dakota Johnson, is a regular festivalgoer as well as performer. Coldplay have headlined Glastonbury four times, and also performed a set at the livestreamed version of the
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Executives at China's Blockchain-based Service Network (BSN) – a state-backed initiative aimed at driving the commercial adoption of blockchain technology – labelled cryptocurrency "the biggest Ponzi scheme in human history" in state-sponsored media on Sunday. "The author of this article believes that virtual currency is becoming the largest Ponzi scheme in human history, and in order to maintain this scam, the currency circle has tried to put on various cloaks for it," wrote Shan Zhiguang and He Yifan in the People's Daily. He Yifan is the CEO of startup Red Date Technology – a founding member and architect behind BSN – where he serves as executive director. Co-author Zhiguang Shan is chair of the BSN Development Alliance. Launched in 2020, BSN provides a Beijing-backed in
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MSNBC announced on Monday that journalist Alex Wagner will succeed Rachel Maddow as host of the network’s highly-watched 9 p.m. time slot four days a week.“Alex Wagner in the 9 p.m. hour was a clear choice. Her unique perspective ― built on more than two decades in journalism ― and tenacious reporting in the U.S. and abroad will help our audiences contextualize what matters,” MSNBC president Rashida Jones said in a statement. “I am looking forward to watching Alex thrive in MSNBC’s primetime lineup.”When she takes over Rachel Maddow's time slot on MSNBC, Alex Wagner will be the only Asian American to host a primetime cable news channel program.Michael Loccisano via Getty ImagesEarlier this year, Maddow announced that she would only host her show once a week, on Mondays. Sta
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When fully-3D video games started arriving in the early 90s, some companies were more prepared for the change than others. Indeed, it would take nearly a decade of experimentation before 3D virtual spaces felt natural. Even then, Konami seems to have shot themselves in the foot at the beginning of this era with their first foray into 3D arcade games. [Mog] shows us the ins-and-outs of these platforms while trying to bring them back to life via MAME. These arcade machines were among the first available with fully-3D environments, but compared to offerings from other companies are curiously underpowered, even for the time. They include only a single digital signal processor which is tasked with calculating all of the scene geometry while competing machines would use multi
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Let’s be clear: this second world war action movie is cliched, wooden and excessively long. Nevertheless, you’ve got to give its director, producer, co-writer and supporting player Michael B Chait and his team a little credit for pulling together what must have been a reasonably expensive shoot for an independent film. You’ve got your aerial dogfights, your period production design (albeit often camouflaged in darkness) and lashings of blanks, squibs and controlled explosive material to make for a very noisy, if tediously protracted, series of climaxes. There are many more egregious wastes of money out there in the world.At least this one, for all its flaws and completely unironic macho posturing, will please some viewers with its many shots of muscled, sweaty soldiers in vests. In o
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Readers facing a long wait for their next fix of Heartstopper: look out for two new teenage romances that channel some of that warmth and feelgood energy, framed by diverse casts of characters. Only on the Weekends (Hodder, £8.99) is Dean Atta’s second young adult verse novel, following the Stonewall book award winner The Black Flamingo. Hopeless romantic Mack longs for love, certain it’s the real deal when Karim becomes his boyfriend. A family move to Scotland presents fresh challenges, not least Mack’s instant attraction to new friend Finlay. It’s full of tender truths on the joy and agony of first love, amplified by the confessional tone of the verse format.In I Kissed Shara Wheeler by Casey McQuiston (Macmillan, £14.99), Chloe has endured the puritanical Willowgrove Christian
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At 6.54am on 8 March 2022, 39-year old Johanna Bygdell from Sweden was perched next to her tent in the middle of Frozen Head State Park, Tennessee, eating breakfast with her boyfriend when she finally heard the noise she had been both craving and dreading. It was the blowing of a conch, marking one hour until the start of arguably the world’s most hellish race: the Barkley Marathons.“Finally, let’s get the party started,” she thought.Bygdell made her final preparations, packing clothes and food, and honed in on her goal of finishing the annual 100-mile ultra endurance challenge. This year, around 40 other determined runners from around the world gathered behind the race’s famous starting line, a yellow gate, with the same hope.But finishing the Barkley Marathons is an anomaly. Si
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Depeche Mode have announced the cause of death of their keyboardist Andrew Fletcher as an aortic dissection – a tear in a main artery from his heart.In a statement on social media, the band said: “A couple weeks ago we received the result from the medical examiners, which Andy’s family asked us to share with you now. Andy suffered an aortic dissection while at home on 26 May. So, even though it was far, far too soon, he passed naturally and without prolonged suffering.”They thanked their fans for their messages of condolence, saying: “It’s been a strange, sad, disorienting few weeks for us here, to say the least. But we’ve seen and felt all of your love and support, and we know that Andy’s family has too.”They said they had marked his death at 60 with a “celebration of
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London’s Heathrow airport has been ordered to reduce its landing charges over the next four years, a proposal that will please airlines while the airport said it would result in a worse experience for passengers.The move by the Civil Aviation Authority deals a blow to the airport, which had argued for higher fees to help protect customer service, at a time when the travel industry is recovering from the pandemic.The regulator said the average maximum price for each passenger that airlines will pay Heathrow will fall from £30.19 now to £26.31 in 2026. Excluding the effects of inflation, this is equal to a near-6% reduction every year until then.The CAA said its final proposals would “be in the best interest of consumers”. It is undertaking a consultation and will announce its final
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Ex-FAANG here and I am firmly in the former camp. These interviews most definitely don't test anything you will be doing on the job. Thing is - that's not the point. These companies need a repeatable, trainable process that can scale reasonably well to thousands of interviewers and hundreds of thousands of applicants. Unless you have individual teams running their own processes (and I believe Netflix does this), real world scenarios no longer fit the constraints. Furthermore, given the extreme volume of applications, the companies feel that they can afford to "hire the best" by adopting particularly rigorous processes.It took me years to internalize this and get over the aversion to studying for these interviews. At the end of the day, many reasonably competent people could do the day-to-d
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Introduction: Heathrow Airport told to cut landing feesGood morning, and welcome to our rolling coverage of business, the world economy and the financial markets.Landing charges at Heathrow will fall over the next few years, the UK’s aviation regulator has ruled, following pressures from airlines to cut the cost of flying to the London airport.Britain’s Civil Aviation Authority is proposing this morning that the average maximum price per passenger that airlines will pay Heathrow will fall from £30.19 today to £26.31 in 2026.The CAA says its final proposals would be “in the best interest of consumers”, and works out as a 6% reduction every year once you account for inflation.The decisition follows a long-running consultation into charges at the UK’s largest airport, as the secto
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Our latest beta (app version 2022.3-beta1) and some WireGuard servers now support VPN tunnels that protect against attackers with access to powerful quantum computers. The encryption used by WireGuard has no known vulnerabilities. However, the current establishment of a shared secret to use for the encryption is known to be crackable with a strong enough quantum computer. Although strong enough quantum computers have yet to be demonstrated, having post-quantum secure tunnels today protect against attackers that record encrypted traffic with the hope of decrypting it with a future quantum computer. Our solution A WireGuard tunnel is established, and is used to share a secret in such a way that a quantum computer can’t figure out the secret even if it had access to the network
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Welcome to The Breakdown, the Guardian’s weekly (and free) rugby union newsletter. Here’s an extract from this week’s edition. To receive the full version every Tuesday, just pop your email in below:Back at the end of November the evidence seemed pretty conclusive. France and Ireland had just beaten New Zealand on successive weekends, England had knocked over South Africa and Australia while Scotland and Wales had also defeated the Wallabies. Looking down the list of results it felt as if the “battle of the hemispheres” had swung decisively towards the north.And now? We are about to discover whether any northern smugness was premature or if it was truly a sign of the times. If Ireland win a best-of-three series in New Zealand it would make a colossal statement. And should England, having muddled through the Six Nations, inflict more woe on the Wallabies it would do wonders for the pre-Rugby World Cup confidence of Eddie Jones’s squad.A little caveat is required: given South Africa’s provinces now compete in the United Rugby Championship and, soon enough, the Heineken Champions Cup, the equator is not as clear a dividing line as it once was. These days it can even be argued that some Welsh players have had more recent first-hand experience of the Highveld than of rugby pitches over the Severn Bridge.For the purposes of this debate, however, let us stick with strict geographical tradition and contemplate the likeliest winners of a straight head to head between the four home unions and the four Rugby Championship sides. Which means that, with 12 Tests scheduled over the next three weekends, the north need to win seven before they can make any grandiose claims.I
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The new generation of F1 gets a video game run-out that's at times overly familiar, but one that's nevertheless fully-featured. F1's bold new era is just hitting the halfway point of its inaugural season, and it turns out it's a lot like the F1 of old; a different team dominating, perhaps, and a slight shuffle of the running order, but there's a feeling 2022's regulations have introduced as many problems as they've fixed, and that the positive impact of the new ruleset won't really be seen for some years to come. F1 22 isn't exactly a bold new era for Codemasters' long-running series, and a familiar racer it most certainly is. It features the cast and cars of the new season - including Ferrari's achingly beautiful F1-75, perhaps the best looking race car to roll out of Maranello since Enzo himself was calling the shots - plus the season's new track that runs around the car park of downtown's Hard Rock Stadium (if you're wizened enough to remember the Caesars Palace race, first off condolences - but also isn't it funny how what's old is new again?) The race in Miami always felt like the endgame for F1 owners Liberty Media's initial push for the sport - a push that, of course, has seen the face of F1 change immeasurably, and mostly for the better thanks to the swell of new fans introduced via Drive to Survive and a new breed of social media savvy drivers. F1 22 reflects that, for better but mostly for worse, with its new F1 Life feature that lets you kit out your avatar with fresh threads while decorating your pad with gaudy artwork on the walls and a supercar on display in th
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Camelot, the outgoing UK national lottery operator, has said players have “tightened their belts” in the face of soaring living costs, as it reported lower sales of tickets and instant win games.The company, which has launched legal action against the Gambling Commission after losing the lottery’s next licence to the Czech-owned newcomer Allwyn, posted a 3% drop in sales to £8.1bn in the year to 31 March. It said most of that fall was caused by a 7% decline in sales of National Lottery Instants to £3.4bn.“This was largely down to greater competition for people’s attention and spend after the lifting of Covid restrictions, followed by growing economic uncertainty over the latter part of the year,” Camelot said.Scratchcard sales remained below pre-pandemic levels. Sales across the 44,500 retailers offering national lottery products fell 4% to £4.7m over the year. Retailers account for nearly 60% of all sales for the group.Camelot blamed pandemic restrictions in the early part of the year that affected footfall and shopper frequency, but more recently the cost of living crisis, which it said had slowed down the retail recovery as “consumers tightened their belts”.Draw-based games fared better, although ticket sales dipped slightly to £4.6bn, with fewer large EuroMillions rollovers. There were 15 draws with a jackpot of more than £100m, compared with 22 the previous year.With Covid restrictions ending, online sales fell by 2.6% to £3.4bn,partly due to the introduction of lower online play and wallet limits for potentially at-risk players.Camelot said £1.9bn was generated for good causes over the year, the second highest total raised.The Camelot chief executive, Nigel Railton, said over the next year the company would “continue to invest and innovate to respond to the changing consumer environment”.He added: “Camelot has once again raised a record amount for good causes from ticket sales, and has also ensured that a record-equalling £3.1bn was once again generated for society through good causes, lottery duty and retailer commission, at a time when other funding sources are being squeezed.”Sign up to the daily Business Today email or f
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From Agatha Christie novels to montages of gay porn, the source material for the 2022 Film London Jarman award nominees list is as varied as the work itself.This year’s contenders for the £10,000 prize include British-Kenyan filmmaker Grace Ndiritu, whose 2021 film Black Beauty sets an advert for factor 5,000 skin cream against a hallucinatory television interview with the writer Jorge Luis Borges. And Onyeka Igwe, a London-based artist whose 2022 film The Miracle on George Green tells the story of the children who tried to save an ancient sweet chestnut tree in Wanstead, east London by writing letters addressed to the treehouse inside it.The award, which is named after the pioneering filmmaker Derek Jarman and recognises British artists working with moving images, has gained a reputation for spotting burgeoning talent within the UK art scene. Previous names on the shortlist have included Heather Phillipson, Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Monster Chetwynd and Charlotte Prodger.Reimagining literature … a still from Rosa-Johan Uddoh’s Black Poirot (2019-2021). Photograph: Rosa-Johan UddohRosa-Johan Uddoh, an interdisciplinary artist inspired by Black feminist practice, is another hotly tipped name on the shortlist. She reimagines classic literature with Black Poirot (2019-2021), which
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Nadine Dorries cares. Nadine Dorries just wants to help. Nadine Dorries is making the pinched, sympathetic face she makes when she is doing something that pains her deeply but nonetheless needs to be done, like abolishing the BBC or selling off the colour red. “In a choice between inclusivity and fairness, as culture secretary I will always choose fairness,” Dorries writes in the Mail on Sunday. “So I’m setting a very clear line on this: competitive women’s sport must be reserved for people born of the female sex. I want all our sporting governing bodies to follow that policy.”Nadine Dorries chooses fairness. Nadine Dorries has a very clear line. One of the most squalid aspects of this entire discourse is the way it has been essentially condensed to a game of political slogans. “Inclusion versus fairness.” “Follow the science.” Comforting, catchy bromides that offer the illusion of clarity, of easy choices and easy binaries.On Tuesday Dorries will meet the governing bodies of several major British sports and tell them to follow Fina’s lead in instituting an indefinite ban on all transgender athletes from competing in women’s swimming competitions. International rugby league has already acted. Sebastian Coe quickly hinted that World Athletics would be next. Now Dorries wants a UK-wide ban, across all sports, immediately.Why the rush? And – given that no trans athlete has ever represented Team GB and the number of trans women in elite sport remains tiny – why now? Perhaps the unseemly haste offers a clue as to the true function of the powerful anti-trans movement: one that claims to be run on “science” and “fairness” but is driven in large part by identity, prejudice and a wish-list that extends far beyond swimming or judo.Let’s start with the science. There are around a dozen studies indicating that a limited sample of trans women who have undergone male puberty retain some physical advantages over natal females. That is “the science”. All of it. Things it is: peer-reviewed, persuasive, evidence of the need for a certain regulatory framework in most sports, particularly contact sports. Things it is not: extensive, beyond
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Climate change is to blame for the majority of the heatwaves being recorded around the planet but the relation to other extreme events impacts on society is less clear, according to a study.“I think on the one hand we overestimate climate change because it’s now quite common that every time an extreme event happens, there is a big assumption that climate change is playing a big role, which is not always the case,” said Friederike Otto, a climate change and environment professor at the Grantham Institute at Imperial College London, who was one of the lead authors of the research.“But on the other hand, we really underestimate those events where climate change does play a role in what the costs are, especially the non-economic costs of extreme weather events to our societies.”In the study published in the journal IOP Publishing, Otto’s team used “attribution science” to pore over available international data, literature and climate models – as well as the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports – and calculate how human-induced climate change is affecting the impact of five types of extreme weather events: heatwaves, heavy rainfall, drought, wildfires and tropical cyclones.They say that in the case of heatwaves, the role of climate change is unequivocal, and that the average and extreme heat levels in every continent across the globe are increasing specifically because of human-caused climate change.A heatwave with a one in 50 chance of happening in pre-industrial times is now almost five times more likely to happen and will be 1.2C hotter, according to an IPCC report. In the past 20 years there have been 157,000 deaths from 34 heatwaves, according to data from the EMDAT disaster database. Yet the impact of human-induced climate change on heatwaves and the repercussions are still largely underestimated.“One big reason why we underestimate heatwaves so dramatically is because no one’s dropping dead on the street during a heatwave, or at least very few people do,” Otto said.Most people died from pre-existing conditions suddenly becoming acute, Otto said, and this often did not show up in data. Wildfires were also one of the
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You must fully disable your popup blocker for this page to work properly. Once started, this page will search for abortions related things once every minute, hopefully adding noise to data about who is searching for abortions. You should do this in a separate browser profile with no tracker blocking for maximum impact, the tracking is the point. Made by easrng, inspired by a post by @thegibson@hackers.town
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LondonBrowse jobsApplyNote: Please protect yourself from job scams! Algolia's recruiting process never requires candidates to purchase products or services, to share personal and/or financial information during the interview process, or to download a third party app. Any legitimate role on a third party site will also be posted on our careers page. Please verify a role exists or apply directly at "website."
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If you’re reading this in the UK, odds are that by now you’ve had coronavirus: 7 in 10 of us have watched the dreaded red line appear. You may have been stuck in bed with it twice or even three times by now; by April 2022, England alone had recorded almost 900,000 reinfections. When the public asked to “return to normal”, I’m not sure a regular hacking cough was what they had in mind.It is an odd situation. Last week, Covid infections were reported to have soared by 43%, while hospitalisation from the virus rose by 23%. An estimated 1.7 million people in the UK tested positive over those seven days. Two million of us now have long Covid, with about two in five of those – or 826,000 people – having symptoms for at least a year.And yet, listen to Boris Johnson or his ministers and you’d be forgiven for thinking none of this was really happening. As a new coronavirus wave threatens to hit the country once again, the government appears more interested in scrapping human rights than protecting human lives. Welcome to sick man Britain: where the public are left to catch coronavirus repeatedly, and ministers pretend everything is fine.Back in February, Johnson said the government had created a plan to start “living with Covid”, but what it really did was form a plan to catch and spread Covid. After all coronavirus prevention measures were dropped on 1 April – from the legal obligation to isolate if you had Covid, to the end of most free testing – the public were left wide open to mass infection. Even hospitals were told by ministers to ditch mask mandates, though some worried trusts have defied the rules and kept them. That all precautions were pulled back just when most people’s vaccine immunity was beginning to fade, and the virus was evolving to be more transmissible, gives a hint at how little logic ministers applied.One of the biggest problems facing Britain’s attempts to quell the virus is that this government doesn’t really want to. There is hope – the number of people dying from Covid has reduced since its peak – but excessive focus on this has long hidden the fact that loss of life has never been the only thing that matters: how many people are infected with the virus matters too. A strategy that lets the virus rip through the population increases the risk we all face, be it from surges, new dangerous variants, or in devel
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The end credits are still rolling when I open up my JustWatch app to mark Luca Guadagnino’s seductive psychodrama A Bigger Splash as “Seen”, complete with satisfying green tick. I click on my Letterboxd account to do the same, logging the date I watched it, before scrolling back and finding my sense of achievement disintegrate into guilt that I have only managed to watch a measly two films in the whole of April.I am one of millions for whom religiously tracking their cultural intake has become as instinctive as recording their steps, workouts, calorie count or periods. Letterboxd – dubbed “the social network for film-lovers”, who can log, review and discuss films with other members – recently hit 6 million members. The Amazon-owned GoodReads, which has been doing the same for books for the past 15 years, has a community of 140 million, with 5.1 million thus far pledged to take part in its 2022 Reading Challenge in which users set a target number of books to read over 12 months. Meanwhile, IMDb has more than 1 billion user reviews logged. Like wellness before it, cultural consumption has become yet another opportunity for us to measure, analyse and optimise our lives using cold, hard data.Ralph Fiennes and Tilda Swinton in A Bigger Splash. Photograph: Jack English/Frenesy Film Company/AllstarI first started logging my cultural intake as an attempt to impose order on the deluge of content available to us, but I quickly succumbed to the buzz of box-ticking. Dr Karen Shackleford, editor of the Psychology of Popular Media journal, compares it to the positive feedback signals we get while playing video games: “It’s kind of amazing what little amount of reward
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Cisco has shrunk its Catalyst 9200 switches into three compact models. Switchzilla reckons they exercise the newfound freedom to undertake remote work by letting organizations squeeze a proper enterprise switch into a wider variety of smaller and more exotic places. The smallest of the models measures 4.4cm x 26.9cm x 16.5cm, and the other two add a little depth to emerge at 4.4cm x 26.9cm x 24.4cm. All are fanless, leading Cisco to suggest you bolt them under desks, nail them to walls, or even slide one into a home office. As the table below shows, the devices have sufficient grunt to handle those scenarios. Model Downlinks Uplinks Power supply C9200CX-12T-2X2G 12 ports data 2x 1G copper, 1x 1G CU PD 802.3bt Class 8, 2x 10G SFP+ fixed uplinks 80W External Power Adapter C9200CX-12P-2X2G 12 ports full PoE+ 2x 1G copper, 2x 10G SFP+ fixed uplinks 310W internal C9200CX-8P-2X2G 8 ports PoE+ 2x 1G copper, 2x 10G SFP+ fixed uplinks 310W internal Cisco's schtick for the small switches is that work from home is great, but better when conducted on a platform that's consistent with the rest of an enterprise network and can be centrally managed. The new devices are therefore a call for those who already run Catalysts in the network core to buy more. Whether it's possible to do so in a timely fashion is another matter. A June 10 letter [PDF] from Cisco to its customers and partners warned that the company is still struggling to find some su
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Who would want to be responsible for monetary policy in 2022? To judge from the fierce economic and political debates under way around the world, it is as though open season has been declared on central bank governors: they are being criticised from all sides.The US Federal Reserve chair, Jerome Powell, and his colleagues are accused of failing to spot the early signs of an inflationary threat last year. As late as last autumn, they were arguing that price rises were “transitory”. With annual US inflation today approaching double figures, that looks to have been a poor judgment. But now that the Fed has acknowledged its mistake and is raising interest rates, many accuse it of choking off the post-pandemic recovery, collapsing equity and bond markets, and precipitating a recession.The European Central Bank has still not begun to raise rates, although it is expected to do so in July. The ECB is charged with indecision and with sowing the seeds of a new eurozone crisis by suggesting a potential reversal of quantitative easing. The spread between the yields on Italian and German government bonds has widened considerably, threatening the fiscal stability of southern Europe. An anti-fragmentation weapon has been promised but remains on the drawing board for now.The Bank of England faces a charge sheet resembling the one drawn up against the Fed, with a couple of added wrinkles. Some have accused the Bank’s governor, Andrew Bailey, of washing his hands of the inflation problem by blaming exogenous factors – the war in Ukraine and energy shortages – for the increase in prices. The Bank is accused of “groupthink”, too. Three of the four external members of its monetary policy committee have voted twice for higher rates, only to be thwarted by the Bank’s five insiders.The Bank of Japan is in a different position. It is accused of doing nothing and presiding over a sharp fall in the external value of the yen.It is tempting to conclude that today’s central bankers are damned if they do and damned if they don’t. Maybe if they sit tight, they will ride out the storm. The then Fed chair, Paul Volcker, was public enemy number one in the US in the early 1980s, when he squeezed post-oil-shock inflation out of the system with double-digit interest rates. But in his later years he was revered, and became a national treasure, called on to advise successive presidents in any financial emergency.But central bankers would be wise not to assume that their reputations will automatically recover, and that the status quo ante will be restored. We live in a more disputatious age than the 1980s. Public institutions are more regularly challenged and held to account by far less reverential legislators.When another former Fed chair, Alan Greenspan, told Congress that he had “learned to mumble with great incoherence”, it was taken as a witty aside. Such a remark would not go down so well today. Taking pride in being obscure is no longer fashionable. After a long period when overtly criticising an independent central bank was not the done thing, politicians nowadays often do so with alacrity. The Fed and the ECB have strong critics in Congress and the E
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KREMENCHUK, Ukraine (AP) — Russian long-range bombers struck a crowded shopping mall in Ukraine’s central city of Kremenchuk with a missile on Monday, raising fears of what President Volodymyr Zelenskyy called an “unimaginable” number of victims in “one of the most daring terrorist attacks in European history.”Zelenskky said that many of the more than 1,000 afternoon shoppers and staff inside the mall managed to escape. Giant plumes of black smoke, dust and orange flames emanated from the wreckage, with emergency crews rushing in to search broken metal and concrete for victims and put out fires. Onlookers watched in distress at the sight of how an everyday activity such as shopping could turn into a horror.The casualty figures were changing as rescuers searched the smoldering rubble into early Tuesday. Ukraine’s emergency services reported late Monday that at least 16 people were dead and about 60 wounded.Soldiers worked into the night to lug sheets of twisted metal and broken concrete, as one drilled into what remained of the shopping center’s roof. Drones whirred above, clouds of dark smoke still emanating from the ruins several hours after the fire had been put out.“We are working to dismantle the construction so that it is possible to get machinery in there since the metal elements are very heavy and big, and disassembling them by hand is impossible,” said Volodymyr Hychkan, an emergency services official.Ukrainian State Emergency Service firefighters to take away debris at a shopping center burned after a rocket attack in Kremenchuk, Ukraine, on June 28, 2022.Efrem Lukatsky via Associated PressUkrainian State Emergency Service firefighters work to take away debris at a shopping mall burned after a missile strike in Kremenchuk, Ukraine, on June 28, 2022. Efrem Lukatsky via Associated PressAt Ukraine’s request, the U.N. Security Council scheduled an emergency meeting in New York on Tuesday to discuss the attack.In the first Russian government comment on the missile strike, the country’s first deputy permanent representative to the United Nations, Dmitry Polyansky, alleged multiple inconsistencies that he didn’t specify, claiming on Twitter that the incident was a provocation by Ukraine. Russia has repeatedly denied it targets civilian infrastructure, even though Russian attacks have hit other shopping malls, theaters, hospitals, kindergartens and apartment buildings.The missile strike unfolded as Western leaders pledged continued support for Ukraine, and the world’s major economies prepared new sanctions against Russia, including a price cap on oil and higher tariffs on goods. Meanwhile, the U.S. appeared ready to respond to Zelenskyy’s call for more air defense systems, and NATO planned to increase the size of its rapid-reaction forces nearly eightfold — to 300,000 troops.Zelenskyy said the mall presented “no threat to the Russian army” and had “no strategic value.” He accused Russia of sabotaging “people’s attempts to live a normal life, which make the occupiers so angry.”In his nightly address, he said it appeared Russian forces had intentionally targeted the shopping center and added, “To
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Stephen Colbert said last week’s Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade contains a fundamental flaw. The ruling allows states to restrict and ban abortion. Or, as the court ruling put it, they have returned “the issue of abortion over to the people’s elected representatives.” Colbert shot back in disbelief: “Have you met the people’s elected representatives?!? I have!” He then called out one right-wing Texas lawmaker, in particular. “Louie Gohmert is one of them,” Colbert said. “I’m not sure if he knows where babies come from!”Colbert has previously dubbed Gohmert “the dumbest man alive” after the GOP congressman complained that Republicans weren’t allow
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On 16 July 1945, the first nuclear bomb exploded on Earth. It happened at a testing site in Alamogordo, New Mexico, as a part of the Manhattan project, a huge US-led initiative to develop atomic weapo
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Trevor Noah has jokingly hatched a plan that might make Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas a little more empathetic.Thomas was among the five conservative justices to overturn Roe v. Wade last week, ending constitutional protections for abortions. In a concurring opinion, the 74-year-old suggested cases that legalized gay sex, same-sex marriage and birth control should also be reconsidered.Thomas, who is Black, is married to Ginni Thomas, a white woman who supported former President Donald Trump’s coup attempt and cited QAnon conspiracy theories in private text messages to Trump’s allies ahead of the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection.Referring to Thomas as “Justice QAnon” on “The Daily
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NEW YORK (AP) — Seven states are set to host primary elections Tuesday as the nation comes to terms with last week’s stunning Supreme Court ruling eliminating the constitutional right to an aborti
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