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Carmelle Kendall for Vox The original Gossip Girl sold viewers a romantic fantasy — then proved the fantasy was always a lie. By Aug 5, 2021, 10:00am EDT Every time I think about Gossip Girl — the glossy, aspirational, slightly wicked teen soap that ruled The CW in 2007 — I ask myself: You mean the show where the romantic lead sold his girlfriend in exchange for a hotel? In my mind, “Gossip Girl has been rebooted” becomes “The show where the male romantic lead gave his rapist uncle permission to have sex with the male lead’s girlfriend in exchange for the property deed to a hotel has been rebooted.” “The new version of Gossip Girl has a bonkers premise” becomes “The new version of the show where the male romantic lead sold his girlfriend’s body for a hotel and then manipulated her into thinking it was her idea and then they got married in the very last episode and you were supposed to think it was romantic has a bonkers premise.” This plot line is emblazoned in my mind, in the spot where knowing how to multiply fractions is probably supposed to be. I can’t escape it. It has baffled me since 2010, when it was introduced during Gossip Girl’s third season: This frothy, sudsy, ridiculous teen soap opera decided to devote multiple episodes to a storyline in which a character sold sexual access to his girlfriend’s body in exchange for real estate — and still expected me to root for the happy couple to end up together. It is wild to imagine how this could possibly have happened! When Gossip Girl first emerged in the 2000s, it was supposed to be fun and scandalous. Magazines devoted cover stories to the show’s “nasty thrill”; ads for the show featured a cheeky “OMFG.” But where was the fun and scandal in the hotel plot? How did an entire writers’ room come to the conclusion that it could have a character do something so irredeemable, only to somehow bring him back from it? What was the exit strategy? Who thought it was a good idea? I was watching Gossip Girl in real time when the episode aired. I was 21, and I went over and over the plot in my head. I had been watching Gossip Girl the way I thought it was supposed to be watched — as a silly piece of froth — and in that spirit, I had come to believe that the lead couple was meant for each other. “Is there some way this could work out?” I thought. “Is there any way I could read this as not as bad as it seems?” I was willing to bend over backward to read the plot line as romantic. I just couldn’t seem to find a justification for it. So I came to resent Gossip Girl — and I bore a special hatred for the hotel plot, known in Gossip Girl fandom as the “Indecent Proposal.” Yet in the decade since the Indecent Proposal played out, I’ve developed a certain grudging respect fo
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9.49am EDT 09:49 Hugo Lowell reports for the Guardian: Top Republicans in Congress are embarking on a new campaign of revisionism seven months after the attack on the Capitol, absolving Donald Trump of responsibility and blaming the House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, for the 6 January insurrection perpetrated by a mob of Trump supporters. Some House and Senate Republican leaders stated in the charged moments immedia
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Seven men have received life sentences for murdering 19-year-old Aya Hachem, a law student who was killed by a bullet meant for a rival business owner.The botched assassination on 17 May last year, orchestrated by Feroz Suleman, 40, was part of a longstanding feud between the owners of two Blackburn tyre companies.Suleman, who owned RI Tyres, and his friend Ayaz Hussain, 35, recruited gunman Zamir Raja, 33 to kill the owner of neighbouring Quickshine Tyres, Pachah Khan.Instead, Hachem, an innocent bystander who had gone out to buy groceries for a family meal that evening, was struck by one of
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The new generation of meatless meat companies has been vocal in its ambition to make animal farming a thing of the past. Beyond Meat CEO Ethan Brown wants to make meat from animals “obsolete,” and so does the CEO of Impossible Foods Pat Brown (no relation), and soon — by the year 2035. As steep a climb as that might sound, it certainly isn’t unrealistic to think that by 2035, startups that make alternative proteins might start eating into the market share for meat and dairy products. Early signs of such a shift are emerging. According to a USDA-funded report, rising plant-based milk sales could be a factor in the decline of cow’s milk consumption (though overall dairy consumption is on the rise, thanks to cheese). An Israeli startup that makes cell-based or “lab-grown” meat just opened a pilot facility to produce 5,000 slaughter-free burgers a day. And looking ahead, the CEO of beef giant Cargill recently said that plant-based meat could make up as much as 10 percent of the meat market within a few years. A largely plant-based future would be a win for livestock, 99 percent of which is raised in factory farms, and the environment, as industrial animal agriculture is a major source of pollution. But it would also cause a massive shift in a huge part of the economy — one that could lead to dislocation and upheaval for the hundreds of thousands of farmers and meatpacking workers who make their livelihood from raising and slaughtering animals. What does the future look like for them? A recent paper from the Breakthrough Institute, a nonprofit that advocates for technological solutions to environmental problems, tried to answer that question. The report surveyed 37 experts on the challenges ahead for a potential plant-based future and found three types of people whose livelihoods could be most vulnerable: farmers who grow soy and corn for animal feed, contract farmers who grow pork or poultry for Big Meat, and meatpacking plant workers. Their position is not unlike what coal miners and oil workers faced a couple of decades ago before natural gas, wind energy, and solar power took over a big chunk of the market. In recent years, some have trained to become wind farm technicians or to install solar panels, while others have been unable to find work in the renewable energy sector. Just as with the shift to green energy, there are potential o
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This week, America’s most watched cable news host is broadcasting from an authoritarian state — not to criticize its leadership but to praise it. Fox’s Tucker Carlson is currently in Budapest, airing his show from Hungary’s capital city. In his Monday monologue, Carlson told his listeners that they should pay attention to Hungary “if you care about Western civilization, and democracy, and family — and the ferocious assault on all three of those things by leaders of our global institutions.” He tweeted out a friendly photo with Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán and is confirmed to speak at a government-supported conference in Budapest on Saturday. Make no mistake: Fox’s marquee host is aligning himself with a ruler who has spent the past 11 years systematically dismantling Hungary’s free political system. A 2021 report from V-Dem, the leading academic institute assessing the state of global democracy, found that Hungary crossed the line into autocracy in 2018. In March, Orbán’s Fidesz party was pushed out of the EPP, an alliance of center-right European parties, because its European peers felt it had strayed too far into authoritarian territory. We’re in Budapest all this week for Tucker Carlson Tonight and a documentary for Tucker Carlson Originals. Don’t miss our first show here starting tonight at 8pm ET on #FoxNews pic.twitter.com/avZLoc0fD0— Tucker Carlson (@TuckerCarlson) August 2, 2021 Despite the increasingly clear evidence that Hungary has abandoned democracy, many conservative intellectuals in America have come to see the Orbán regime as a model for America. These right-wing observers, typically social conservatives and nationalists, see Orbán’s willingness to use state power against the LGBT community, academics, the press, and immigrants as an example of how conservatives can fight back against left-wing cultural power. They either deny Fidesz’s authoritarian streak or, more chillingly, argue that it’s necessary to defeat the left — a chilling move at a time when the GOP is waging war on American democracy, using tactics eerily reminiscent of the ones Fidesz successfully deployed against Hungary’s democratic institutions. Carlson’s visit to Budapest, a follow-up to previous pro-Orbán coverage, shows that this authoritarian envy is no longer confined to a fringe. Authoritarianism, Hungarian style To understand why the American right’s admiration for a small Central European state is so concerning, it’s important to understand exactly how democracy in Hungary died. For roughly the first two decades of Hungary’s post-communist history, 1990 to 2010, Hungary was a young but stable democracy. When Orbán was elected prime minister the first time, in 1998, he governed as a relatively conventional European conservative; when Fidesz lost the 2002 elections, a new prime minister from the rival Socialist party took over. But though Orbán stepped aside, he and his followers never really accepted the 2002 defeat as legitimate. When Fidesz returned to power after the country’s 2010 election, winning a two-thirds majority amidst the Great Recession and incumbent corruption scandal
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Holiday bookings to France have surged after the government announced on Wednesday that its “amber plus” status has been dropped – meaning vaccinated holidaymakers will no longer have to quarantine on their return, according to operators.A Brittany Ferries spokesperson said phones had been “ringing off the hook” since last night. “There’s been a huge spike in interest and bookings. At last there is some good news and some certainty – it’s a silver lining to the dark clouds that have been hanging over us. We suspect it’s a lot of second homeowners who were waiting to book, as well as last-minute holidaymakers.”The government also announced that no further changes to the traffic-light system would be made for at least three weeks. As well as France moving to the amber list, seven countries – Germany, Austria, Slovenia, Slovakia, Latvia, Romania and Norway – were added to the green list. The new rules come into effect from 4am on Sunday, so anyone arriving from France before then will still need to quarantine for 10 days.A Eurostar spokesperson said: “We welcome the removal of quarantine restrictions for passengers travelling to the UK from France. Overnight we have seen a strong increase in bookings on our London-Paris route and traffic to our website has more than doubled.“We are looking forward to welcoming more passengers on board in the coming days and weeks. We have already added services to our timetable for the last two weekends of this month and are ready to further increase capacity to carry as many passengers as possible between the UK and France.”Eurotunnel Le Shuttle saw a 400% increase in sales immediately after the announcement and said it anticipated a substantial demand for last-minute summer holidays.Ravi Sabharwal, co-founder of villa holiday specialist Oliver’s Travels, said it had seen a 43% rise in bookings on Thursday.“We’ve seen a strong uptick for France, particularly to the Loire and Provence – but it was from a low base, as people were cautious. We have some availability left – which we expect to fill – but there are only three peak weeks left of the summer now. Many people have written off 2021 and are just booking for 2022 instead.” In comparison, bookings for Croatia, which is on the green list, were up 200% year-on-year, he said.Other companies warned that summer availability in France was tight. Gîtes de France said that with many French people choosing to holiday at home this year, 80% of its accommodation for August was already sold out.Sawdays, which saw searches for France double overnight, reported some availability for late-summer self-catering stays, with options including a barn for two in Lerné, in the Loire valley, from €135 a night; and a Provençal house for 10 in Graveson, from €499 a night.For operators offering group tours the situation was more challenging.“The inconsistencies of the traffic-light system have been so difficult to navigate,” said Stephen Brook, co-founder of Ciceroni Travel, which specialises in escorted cultural tours. “A tour to France planned for 21 August has been on hold. It can now go ahead, which it is good news, of co
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London will bear the brunt of an £11bn drop in revenue from overseas tourists resulting from the government’s continued tough restrictions on travel to England, according to research.The Centre for Economic & Business Research (CEBR) study said the capital would suffer a loss of almost £7bn compared with levels of spending in the six-month period leading up to the pandemic, unless there was a marked pick up in the rest of the year.The consultancy firm said London was being doubly hit because it was by far the most popular destination for international visitors, but was not getting the benefits of UK citizens taking their holidays at home this year.According to the CEBR study, rules for t
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If you have a solid internet connection, you owe it to yourself to get a mesh Wi-Fi system. It’ll help to cover more of your apartment or home in fast Wi-Fi. You can get Google’s Wifi in a three-pack for $150 at Amazon, down from $200. This 25 percent discount is the biggest price markdown yet. And considering that Google sells a single Wifi unit for $100, it doesn’t make much sense to opt for that when you can get another two for just $50 more. Now, Google’s newer Nest Wifi does offer better range and more features than this product, but these are still worth getting if you’re on a budget (not to mention, it’s cross-compatible with Nest Wifi, should you ever upgrade). Each Go
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No matter how hard you try to spin the house balls at your local bowling joint, they rarely curve. That’s because they are simple spheres built for durability, not fancy moves. But a small handful of companies—among them Storm Bowling—create gear that is surprisingly complex inside. Precisely shaped, meticulously balanced weight blocks leverage the laws of physics to help skilled alley jockeys throw a strike on most rolls. This clever engineering allows the projectiles to hook inward as they approach the end of the 60-foot lane, where the invisible oil slick on the boards thins. The spin an expert gives the globe (as fast as 600 rpm) will find purchase there as the friction i
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WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — The queen’s representative in New Zealand said Prince Harry and Meghan discussed moving to the South Pacific country during their 2018 visit, more than a year before the couple stepped back from royal duties and moved to the United States. Governor-General Patsy Reddy also told The Associated Press in an interview she believes the British monarch should remain New Zealand’s head of state and described the hand-typed letters she sends to Queen Elizabeth II. Reddy, 67, will leave her largely ceremonial role representing the queen in New Zealand in October after a 5-year term. A lawyer who was given the honorific Dame for her services to arts and business,
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Cisco has published patches for critical vulns affecting the web management interface for some of its Small Business Dual WAN Gigabit routers – including a 9.8-rated nasty. The two vulnerabilities affect the RV340, RV345, RV340W, and RV345P products, which are aimed at SMEs and home office setups. Attackers abusing them on unpatched devices are able to execute arbitrary code and also force reboots of affected routers, causing a denial-of-service condition. CVE-2021-1609, rated 9.8 on the CVSS v3.1 scale, allows attackers to "remotely execute arbitrary code" thanks to improper validation of HTTP requests, according to Cisco's advisory. Similarly, CVE-2021-1610 (advisory also availab
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The integration of less and vim appeared above many times. However, when you move to graphical interfaces, those aren’t very composable at all--the only methods in wider use are through splitting out a library, wiring it in as a component, or plainly running a program with certain parameters, potentially feeding it commands from outside--the mutual connection isn’t apparent to the user. Even TUIs are lacking, as one would often want to employ a terminal subemulator, which is a substantial amount of code, and brings its own set of problems with it--yet it’s at least workable, and universal. XEmbed can kind of work--e.g., GVIM can be integrated using GtkPlug/GtkSocket with --socketid {id}--but this needs to be supported explicitly in the client. Moreover, the protocol specification mostly consists of a list of reasons why you don’t want to use it. In theory, GVIM’s --echo-wid could also be used to simply XReparentWindow() like a window manager would, without considering the XEmbed protocol at all, but I’m almost certain there is a serious problem hidden in the details. Wayland has an unstable (as is typical) protocol called XDG foreign. I can’t trash-talk Wayland to the extent it deserves yet. The counterpoint It could be argued that unlike the terminal, GUI toolkits, which is what you have to use to retain sanity, come with extensive libraries, and already cover the need for less (GtkTextView) and vim (GtkSourceView), but that’s not the point. Do you like to be constrained to use a particular means of text display or editing, rather than being able to just set PAGER and EDITOR to whatever you prefer? What I would like to see To make this clear, my concern has everything to do with subwindowing and redirection. As far as I understand, Plan 9 makes this achievable if you launch a program with a specially crafted /dev namespace, and reimplement a subset of rio, yet even there, it’s not something you should be doing. I haven’t got very far with my analysis of what a graphical terminal enabling this concept would do, but from my experience with widget toolkits, there shouldn’t be any major barriers, so long as the programs are reasonably
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poly-lt-wire-logo Rina Takasaki (left), voice of Susato, and Mark Takeshi Ota (left), voice of Ryunosuke in The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles Graphic: James Bareham/Polygon | Source images: Capcom “To be able to understand [Susato] ... it is very helpful that I fully understand Japanese language and culture” By Aug 5, 2021, 9:00am EDT The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles shows main characters Ryunosuke Naruhodo and Susato Mikotoba getting off at a train station in London. Rina Takasaki, the voice behind Susato in the game’s English voice track, says that she could relate to her character’s journey through that moment. “I was also a teenager when I landed in Britain for the first time, full of ambition, determination, and admiration for the foreign culture,” she recalls to me over email. Takasaki still vividly remembers the moment she arrived in the UK, though for her it was through Heat
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DETROIT (AP) — The Biden administration wants automakers to raise gas mileage and cut tailpipe pollution between now and model year 2026, and it has won a voluntary commitment Thursday from the industry that electric vehicles will comprise up to half of U.S. sales by the end of the decade. The moves are big steps toward President Joe Biden’s pledge to cut emissions and battle climate change as he pushes a history-making shift in the U.S. from internal combustion engines to battery-powered vehicles. They also reflect a delicate balance to gain both industry and union support for the environmental effort, with the future promise of new jobs and billions in new federal investments in electric vehicles. The administration on Thursday announced there would be new mileage and anti-pollution standards from the Environmental Protection Agency and Transportation Department, part of Biden’s goal to cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030. It said the auto industry had agreed to a target that 40% to 50% of new vehicle sales be electric by 2030. Both the regulatory standards and the voluntary target will be included in an executive order that Biden plans to sign later Thursday. The standards, which have to go through the regulatory process including public comments, would reverse fuel economy and anti-pollution rollbacks done under President Donald Trump. At that time, the increases were reduced to 1.5% annually through model year 2026. Still, it remained to be seen how quickly consumers would be willing to embrace higher mileage, lower-emission vehicles over less fuel-efficient SUVs, currently the industry’s top seller. The 2030 EV targets ultimately are nonbinding, and the industry stressed that billions of dollars in electric-vehicle investments in legislation pending in Congress will be vital to meeting those goals. Only 2.2% of new vehicle sales were fully electric vehicles through June, according to Edmunds.com estimates. That’s up from 1.4% at the same time last year. The White House didn’t release information on the proposed annual mileage increases late Wednesday, but Dan Becker, director of the safe climate campaign for the Center for Biolo
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Five years ago, I began to notice that the perpetrators of some of the worst terrorist attacks had something in common. A high proportion shared a history of assaulting wives, girlfriends and other female relatives, sometimes involving a whole series of victims, long before they attacked total strangers.In the summer of 2016, for example, when just two terrorist attacks in Florida and the south of France left 135 people dead and hundreds injured, both perpetrators claimed to be Islamists. But I was struck by the fact that each had a horrific record of domestic violence.A year later, there were four fatal attacks in the UK and all six perpetrators turned out either to have abused women or, in one case, to have witnessed his father abusing his mother and sister. There were striking similarities between the histories of Darren Osborne, the rightwing extremist who drove a van into worshippers leaving a mosque in north London, and Khalid Masood, the Islamist who staged an attack on Westminster Bridge. Both men had criminal records for violent offences – and both had abused women.I thought these cases challenged conventional wisdom about terrorism, which holds that it is all about ideology. Many fatal terrorist attacks actually appeared to be an escalation of violence that had been going on, sometimes for years, against members of the perpetrator’s family. I was convinced that the police and MI5 needed to change the way they assessed the risk posed by suspects, treating a history of domestic violence as a very significant red flag.When I raised this with the authorities, however, I encountered scepticism and disbelief. So I decided to write a book, using published sources to piece together a woeful catalogue of men who had humiliated, beaten and sexually assaulted women long before they became notorious as terrorists. It was published in 2019 and this time senior figures at counter-terrorism policing and the Home Office listened.They commissioned groundbreaking research using data on just over 3,000 referrals to the Prevent programme in England and Wales in 2019 – adults and children who had caused concern to teachers, social workers and family members because o
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Lyft is boosting its $19.99-per-month Lyft Pink membership program with new bike-share benefits and an annual option that’s cheaper than paying for the service month to month, the company announced Thursday. Lyft Pink’s primary benefit is a 15 percent discount on car rides, but previously, it also offered three free 30-minute bike or scooter rides per month (in certain markets). With the new bike-share benefits, you’ll get an unlimited amount of 45-minute bike rides on “classic” bikes (aka non-electric) at many of the company’s bike-share systems across the US as well as discounted rates on e-bike rides. The new annual option for Lyft Pink will cost $199 per year, which is a $40 discount over paying monthly. If you regularly use Lyft year-round and enjoy other Lyft Pink bene
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Google has announced a new line of home security cameras and a video doorbell under its Nest brand. The new models, which include an indoor-only camera, an indoor / outdoor camera, a floodlight, and the video doorbell, replace the older Nest IQ cameras and Nest Hello doorbell. The main themes with the new devices are a unified design language and more accessible pricing — each model costs less than the camera it’s replacing, while adding more capabilities. The design of the new cameras will be familiar to anyone who’s seen other Nest products released in the past couple of years, such as the latest Nest Thermostat, Nest WiFi, or the Nest Audio smart speaker. The company has been moving toward softer edges and muted color palettes, and the new cameras adhere to that with color opti
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Microsoft billionaire Bill Gates said he made “a huge mistake” in meeting with the convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.“It was a huge mistake to spend time with him, to give him the credibility of being there,” Gates told CNN on Wednesday.Gates said he met with Epstein hoping the financier could help raise money for global health issues.“I had several dinners with him, you know, hoping that what he said about getting billions of philanthropy for global health through contacts that he had might emerge,” Gates said. “When it looked like that wasn’t a real thing, that relationship ended.”Epstein killed himself in jail in 2019 while awaiting trial on federal charges of sex-trafficking girls as young as 14. In 2008, Epstein avoided federal prosecution on similar charges in a controversial plea deal.The Wall Street Journal reported in May that Melinda French Gates had concerns about her husband’s dealings with Epstein when she consulted lawyers to discuss a possible divorce. The Journal said several of its sources said Melinda had concerns about Bill’s relationship with Epstein since at least 2013.The couple filed for divorce in May and the process was finalized
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Facebook has shut down the personal accounts of a pair of New York University researchers and shuttered their investigation into misinformation spread through political ads on the social network. Facebook says the researchers violated its terms of service and were involved in unauthorized data collection from its massive network. The academics, however, say the company is attempting to exert control on research that paints it in a negative light. The NYU researchers with the Ad Observatory Project had for several years been looking into Facebook’s Ad Library, where searches can be done on advertisements running across Facebook’s products. The access was used to “uncover systemic flaws in the Facebook Ad Library, to identify misinformation in political ads, including many sowing distrust in our election system, and to study Facebook’s apparent amplification of partisan misinformation,” said Laura Edelson, the lead researcher behind NYU Cybersecurity for Democracy, in a statement. Facebook’s action against the NYU project also cut off other researchers and journalists who got access to Facebook data through the project, Edelson said. The researchers offered Facebook users a web browser plug-in tool that let them volunteer their data showing how the social network targets political ads. But Facebook said the browser extension was programmed to evade its detection systems and vacuum up user data, creating privacy concerns. In a blog post late Tuesday, Facebook said it takes “unauthorized data scraping seriously, and when we find instances of scraping we investigate and take action to protect our platform.” Facebook sent a cease-and-desist letter to E
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Michael Murray, Frasers Group’s “head of elevation”, looks set to take the lift to the top of the company run by his future father-in-law, after leading an improvement in the look of its once proudly shabby Sports Direct stores.The 31-year-old Doncaster-born son of a property developer began by helping Sports Direct founder and controlling shareholder Mike Ashley with personal property deals a few years after meeting his daughter Anna on holiday in 2011.The former club promoter is now Ashley’s right-hand man, overseeing the revamp of Sports Direct stores and improving the group’s image with glossy ads and social media to help improve the relationship with high-end brands.A big part of the job has been ditching Sports Direct’s pile-it-high image which has turned key brands off the company and led them to withhold some of their most sought-after gear.While the majority of stores still require updating, the company is taking advantage of the retrenchment of other retailers to move into larger, more modern spaces that combine its high street brands including streetwear concept USC, bicycle retailer Evans and video games concept Belong.Murray has also helped build up the Flannels chain, where it is possible to spend over £4,500 on a Brioni suede jacket, pick up Alexander McQueen trainers for £420 or a pair of Off White socks for £48, discounted from £60 at present.Murray has gradually become a more high profile face of Frasers, recently taking journalists on a tour
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The British government was one of the “biggest supporters” of EU plans to require non-EU nationals to obtain authorisation and pay a fee to enter the bloc’s passport-free travel zone, the Guardian has learned.David Cameron’s government backed the idea when it was floated by the European Commission in April 2016, three months before the EU referendum, when few foresaw the €7 (£5.95) fee would one day hit British travellers.Brexit supporters reacted with fury this week when the commission said plans for a European travel information and authorisation system (Etias) were on track to co
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WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell last week by 14,000 to 385,000 more evidence that the economy and the job market are rebounding briskly from the coronavirus recession. The Labor Department reported Thursday that unemployment claims — a proxy for layoffs — dropped last week from a revised 399,000 the week before. The applications have mostly fallen steadily since topping 900,000 in early January. Still, they remain high by historic levels: Before the pandemic slammed the United States in March 2020, they were coming in at around 220,000 a
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Solène created a week-long personal computing challenge around old computers. I chose to use an Amiga for the week. In this issue I write about my experience, and what modern computing lost when Commodore died. I also want to show some of the things you can do with an Amiga or even an emulator if you'd like to try.If someone sent this to you and you’d like to read more, check out the back issues. Get future issues in your inbox by subscribing below or add the site to your RSS reader. As I keep telling my partner, Amigas aren’t an addiction, they’re just a very expensive hobby.This iss
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Travel restrictions are changing for some travellers again – so keep up to date with our guide to the latest rules.What’s happening?Every three weeks, ministers review the traffic light system that grades countries across the world on their case, vaccine and variant rate, then decide on changes to the green, amber and red list.Those decisions were announced on Wednesday and will come into force from 4am this coming Sunday. They will initially apply to England only, with the devolved administrations considering whether to follow suit.It is mostly good news for travellers, with no countries taken off the green list that means passengers do not need to quarantine when they arrive in the UK – regardless of whether they are fully vaccinated or not.New countries added to the green list are
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Oren, TurkeyArmy soldiers using water hoses try to extinguish forest fires close to the Kemerkoy thermal power plant Photograph: Yasin Akgül/AFP/Getty Images
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British holidaymakers in Mexico have told of their dismay after the country was abruptly put on the government’s red list of travel destinations.The changes, which were announced on Wednesday night and will come into force at 4am on Sunday, mean that holidaymakers coming from Mexico and other red list countries – including Georgia, La Réunion and Mayotte - will either have to cut their holidays short to beat the restrictions or pay thousands of pounds to stay in a quarantine hotel when they return.Among those forced to cut their holiday short was Joe Coward, 29, who criticised the government’s handling of travel rules sharply after finding out about the changes shortly after landing in Mexico on Thursday morning for a two-week honeymoon near Cancún.The student from London told PA M
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The best images from the 13th day of action in Tokyo, including hockey, skateboarding, athletics, track cycling and open-water swimming Steven Bloor Main image: Canada’s Damian Warner on his way to first place in the men’s decathlon 110m hurdles.
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Rate, review, share on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud, Acast and Stitcher, and join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and email. On the podcast today: previews of the Championship, League One and League Two. The panel assesses whether teams relegated from the Premier League are going to make an immediate return, whether the third tier is the most exciting division in England and the incredible staying power of Newport County’s Kevin Ellison. Elsewhere, Danny Ings springs a surprise on everyone by moving to Aston Villa, there are reports that Harry Kane is in Florida and we spend arguably too long reviewing a remarkable post-match menu for Manchester United’s first team. Tickets are still available for our live Premier League sh
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Simon Jenkins’ latest piece on HS2 (Depleted and unwanted, HS2 hurtles on as Johnson’s £100bn vanity project, 30 July) repeatedly mischaracterises both the case for, and the benefits of, a rail project that will transform connectivity in the UK.He talks as if services will only go from London to Birmingham, stating confidently that “Britain’s new high-speed railway will not – repeat: not – get to the north of England”. But this is simply untrue. Construction work on the Birmingham-Crewe section is now under way, and detailed planning and consultation prior to a parliamentary bill submission is under way for Crewe-Manchester. HS2 services will reach Edinburgh, Newcastle, Liverpool, Leeds and more than a dozen other cities across the country.He is at least accurate when he say
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Late last month, 27 Republican members of the Georgia state Senate sent an ominous letter to the state elections board, touting a misleading claim about the 2020 election popularized by Fox News host Tucker Carlson. A few days later, several Republican members of the state House sent a similar letter seeking a “performance review” of election officials in the Democratic stronghold of Atlanta. In a post-Trump GOP, it might seem unremarkable that elected officials are spouting off about some lie or half-truth broadcast by conservative media. But these letters set in motion a chain of events that could end in mass disenfranchisement of voters in the Democratic stronghold of Atlanta for the 2022 statewide and midterm elections. In March, Georgia Republicans passed SB 202, a sweeping new
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The number of Americans who renounced their citizenship in favor of a foreign country hit an all-time high in 2020: 6,707, a 237% increase over 2019.Between the lines: While the numbers are down this year, that's probably because many U.S. embassies and consulates remain closed for COVID-19, and taking this grave step requires taking an oath in front of a State Department officer.Why it matters: The people who flee tend to be ultra-wealthy, and many of them are seeking to reduce their tax burden. New tax and estate measures proposed by the Biden administration could, if implemented, accelerate this trend.The big picture: Only the U.S. and Eritrea tax people based on citizenship rather than residency. For most countries, if you are a citizen but don’t reside there, you aren’t taxed in t
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Around 450 billion fewer pages were printed from home and office devices in 2020 as COVID-19 disrupted the world of work. The direction of travel has been obvious in recent times: people were printing less even before the pandemic took hold, but the decline was sharper last year as volumes plunged 14 per cent on 2019 levels to a total of 2.8 trillion pages, according to IDC. Click to enlarge Unsurprisingly, employees being asked to stay indoors and work from home caused the number of laser pages printed to fall 16 per cent, a drop that was even more pronounced for A3 devices. Conversely, pages printed on inkjet printers went up by 4 per cent compared to the prior 12 months. Inkjets were typically used mostly for personal printing before COVID-19 turned the world upside down. According to
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Mike Ashley is “transitioning” out of the job of chief executive at Frasers and handing the gig to his prospective son-in-law, Michael Murray. That, at least, was the Sports Direct firm’s summary of next year’s switch. The critical line, though, was the one at the end. Ashley will “remain on the board as an executive director”. He isn’t even adopting the formal back-seat role of a non-executive.So who will be making the big decisions? And, if there’s a disagreement, who will prevail? Will it be the 31-year-old who has worked for the company only for a few years as a consultant? Or could it – just possibly – be the 56-year-old who founded the business in 1982 and still controls 64% of the shares? This looks a transfer of power in name only, at least until Ashley decides
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The endangered hen harrier is continuing its recovery from near extinction in England with this summer set to have the highest number of chicks fledging since 2002.Of 24 successful nests producing at least 77 fledged chicks this summer, 19 were on moors managed for red grouse, according to the Moorland Association.The grouse shooting industry hailed the success as a vindication for controversial brood management, in which some chicks are removed from nests and reared in captivity if multiple nests are made on grouse moors.Hen harriers like to nest in proximity to each other, but grouse moor managers complain that concentrations of the bird predate too many red grouse, which provide a lucrative driven grouse shooting season.The brood management trial began in 2018 but was disavowed by conse
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Jessica Cisneros, a progressive immigration attorney who narrowly lost a 2020 primary election challenge against Democratic Texas Rep. Henry Cuellar, announced Thursday she’ll try again. In her March 2020 run against Cuellar, one of the House’s most conservative Democrats, Cisneros surprised poll watchers with a strong showing against the veteran incumbent, losing by less than 4 percentage points.  “The last election showed that people are ready for new leadership and we’re ready to finish the job that we started,” Cisneros told HuffPost. “A lot of people were left with so much hope last election cycle,” she added. “We were asking folks to envision the impossible and we were so close that we could taste that victory. I wanted to honor all the hard work that everyone put into this election.” Cisneros, the daughter of Mexican immigrants, briefly practiced law in New York City before moving home to Laredo in 2019 to run against Cuellar in Texas’ 28th Congressional District.  As the COVID-19 pandemic set in, Cisneros stayed in the district to work as an immigration attorney along the Texas-Mexico border. She joined Texas RioGrande Legal Aid’s Laredo office, where she represents low-income clients in need of legal representation. She has also been working as a supervising attorney at the Laredo office for RAICES, a nonprofit that represents undocumented immigrants in detention. Cisneros, a proponent of Medicare for All and the Green New Deal, champions causes that excite the national progressive movement. But she used a two-minute announcement video to advertise her ties to working-class people in South Texas. “They said we had no chance. They said
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I know what some of you are thinking. Strictly is getting its first all-male partnership? Big deal. It’s 2021! There are LGBTQ+ relationships depicted on screen in all manner of TV shows all the time, from Emmerdale to It’s A Sin. Surely in an era where queer relationships are depicted as being everyday and normal, we shouldn’t make a fuss when same-sex couples are announced on TV shows. Right?Wrong. Trust me on this: the news that former Bake Off winner John Whaite is to be part of the first all-male partnership on Strictly, a year after the first same-sex pairing between Nicola Adams and Katya Jones, does matter. It matters not just in terms of having LGBTQ+ lives fairly reflected on-screen, but because of the audience that watches Strictly (that is, families). In particular, those young people watching within those families, many of whom are working out their sexuality in secret and using television as a place to work out their place in the world, in the same way generations of queer people did before them. Seeing someone like Whaite (just like Adams) happy with a same-sex partner proves to them that they can have the same happy and fulfilling lives and relationships as straight people. “Just to see two men or two women dancing together, it’s not necessarily about sexuality, it’s just about intimacy and respect,” Whaite told the BBC.The inclusion of same-sex couples on Strictly also skewers the homophobic trope that same-sex relationships are somehow inappropriate for families. Until Adams and Jones, there seemed to be a sense that showing same-sex partnerships was somehow “risky” on Strictly. There were performances that featured same-sex partners, a
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I know we’re all eager to forget, but let’s reflect back on spring 2020 for a moment. It was a season marked by the illogical, unharmonious totems of a looming pandemic: celebrity hand-washing videos, apocalyptic grocery store runs, waves of viral content involving windowsill singing and pot-banging. This global camaraderie might have been heartwarming, if it weren’t all so utterly terrifying. And in addition to the very real fear of a pandemic, many Americans also faced the looming dread of a financial crisis both sweepingly national and disarmingly personal. In the second quarter of 2020, US unemployment reached 14.8 percent, its highest rate since the record began in 1948. America’s GDP plummeted at an annual rate of 31.7 percent in the same time period. Across a spectrum of industries — mental health care, marketing, hospitality — my friends and loved ones expressed a sense of financial disequilibrium and tightrope-walking economics that followed us well into summertime. As a reliable income evaporated for a significant contingent of Americans, you might assume national credit card debt increased as those in need leaned on the lifeline — but you’d be wrong. According to a recent congressional report, credit card balances actually declined sharply, by $76 billion, in the second quarter of 2020. You might also assume that, with the guillotine of joblessness hanging precipitously in the balance, Americans might defer large purchases, like homes or cars. Again, you’d be wrong: By the fourth quarter of 2020, mortgage debt grew to $10 trillion (compared to a fourth-quarter 2019 statistic of $9.56 trillion), and auto loan debt reached $1.4 trillion. Desperate times, it seems, did not lead to desperate measures. If Americans were facing what many anticipated would be the largest financial slump since the Great Depression, or at least the Great Recession, why were their spending and debt accumulation habits so … healthy? Sociologist and demographer Teresa Sullivan has some ideas. Sullivan, who teaches at the University of Virginia, has studied consumer bankruptcy for decades, publishing award-winning books on the subject alongside co-author
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The National Fraternal Order of Police isn’t usually bashful about defending officers, but it’s been conspicuously subdued in discussing the January 6 attacks.ALEX BRANDON / POOL / AFP via GettyAbout the author: Adam Serwer is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he covers politics. On Tuesday, the National Fraternal Order of Police decided to “clear up confusion” about its position on the January 6 assault on the Capitol by enraged Donald Trump supporters. “Those who participated in the assaults, looting, and trespassing must be arrested and held to account,” it said in a statement. “We continue to offer our support, gratitude, and love to our brothers and sisters in law enforcement who successfully fought off the rioters, and we will be with them as they grieve and recover, however long that may take.”The FOP does not often have to clarify its position on matters of public concern; the organization is usually rather strident in expressing its views. For example, in 2016, the FOP demanded that Walmart cease selling Black Lives Matter T-shirts. It denounced Nike for its ad campaign involving Colin Kaepernick, who was purged from the NFL for protesting police misconduct. If you go to the FOP’s Twitter feed, you can find a steady stream of clips from conservative
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Jofra Archer’s hopes of spearheading England’s T20 World Cup and Ashes campaigns this winter have been ended following the emergence of the latest stress fracture in his troublesome right elbow.The 26-year-old fast bowler has spent the majority of the summer on the sidelines after undergoing surgery to remove an impingement in the joint in May and a goal of returning midway through the current India Test series was always optimistic.But after a tentative recent return for Sussex, bowling nine overs in two white-ball matches, Archer reported further discomfort, with a visit to a specialist delivering the news that the injury is worse than both he and England were fearing.An England spokesperson said: “The England and Wales Cricket Board can confirm that England fast bowler Jofra Archer underwent further scans on his injured right elbow last week. The scans revealed that he has suffered a recurrence of a stress fracture.“In response to these findings, he has been ruled out for the rest of the year and will miss the current LV Insurance Test series against India, the ICC Men’s T20 World Cup 2021 and the Ashes series in Australia.“The 26-year-old, who had an operation in May to remove a bone fragment from his elbow, returned to play last month. As part of his return-to-bowling programme, he became aware of increasing discomfort in his elbow during matches for Sussex in the Vitality Blast and a 50-over friendly against Oxfordshire. The operation [was] not related to the stress fracture that sidelined the player previously.“He will now spend time on an extended break from cricket before returning for a medical review in early autumn.”It is the second time Archer has been diagnosed with a stress fracture in his right elbow, with the same issue ending his tour of South Africa in 2019/20 ended after one Test. England may maintain this year’s problems are unrelated but it is clear his push for 90mph-plus top speeds is creating regular wear and tear in his bowling arm.The concern for England now is that Archer may be forced to specialise in white-ball cricket due to the physical demands of playing Tests and, given his rise to prominence on the global T20
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You don’t have to be a dedicated “plant parent” to appreciate the life and color plants bring to every room in your home. A stately bird of paradise in the living room, a trailing pothos in the kitchen, a line of succulents on the windowsill in your bedroom—they don’t have to be the center of attention, but they gently point towards a home well-kept, since they have to be watered and kept alive, of course. And if you ask me, every room in a house needs a plant. But what to do about the bathroom—the small, humid, and usually natural-light-less room oft forgotten in the plant world? The general trick here is to choose plants that enjoy high humidity (luckily that’s lots of tropical plants), because any amount of showering will emit lots of moisture into the air. So, if you’re ready to deck your bathroom out with living art, here are 12 of our favorite plants that’ll thrive in your bathroom. Arguably one the most important factors to consider when choosing a plant for your bathroom is how much light it gets. If the room has windows (or a skylight) and is generally quite bright—for instance, if you don’t have to turn the lights on to use the mirror during the day—then you’ll need a light-loving plant for the space. Philodendrons Heartleaf Philodendrons are great for the bathroom, but not for your pets Photo by James Ransom Heartleaf philodendrons are easy to take care of because they show you exactly what they need. If their leaves are turning brown, they need more water, and if they’re turning yellow, they need less. However, this may not be the right option for you if you have pets, as they’re toxic to animals. Orchids These beautiful flowers love the damp environment of bathrooms (Some people even go as far as to put them in the shower), but they do need bright, indirect light to thrive. Airplants Airplants are basically tropica
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CareersWork hard, have fun & do what you love to do.Whatnot is the fastest growing marketplace in the USDiversity & InclusionWhatnot empowers every employee to reach their full potential, regardless of race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or background.Benefits of WhatnotLive your best lifeSelf-careHealth, dental, and vision; One Medical; Spring Health mental wellbeing; Calm membership.MoneyCompetitive compensation with a biannual merit cycle, equity, 401(k) plan, and more.RestUnlimited PTO if full-time, paid holidays, company weeks off, and parental leave.FreedomRemote-first, team and
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by in CodeSOD on 2021-08-05 Edit Remy PorterRemy escaped the enterprise world and now makes LEDs blink pretty. Editor-in-Chief for TDWTF. Lets say you have a 64-bit integer. You want the first 42-bits. Now, if your language has a bitshift operator, you'd be tempted to do something like largeNumber >> 22. But what if your language also has all sorts of advanced stream processing and map functions? It'd be a shame to not use those. Tarah's shop uses Rust, and thu
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The worst of the pandemic shutdowns are over, I am told, but I am still a nervous wreck. PPP and grants saved independent restaurants from closing and business is booming, I am told, but I am still worried about my restaurants. Food costs are at an all-time high. Scallops are 40 percent more expensive, shallots are up 44 percent, brussels sprouts are up 32 percent. Some weeks I can’t find chicken wings. And when thousands of restaurants across America tried to reopen all at the same time this past spring, I knew an employee shortage was bound to happen. But for it to last this long, you couldn’t predict that.So here we are, struggling to find workers, supplies, and ingredients for our restaurants. In the past three months, I have picked up shifts in every kitchen position; I’ve been a bartender, a host, a waiter. I have driven across town to buy ingredients from grocery stores when our purveyors shorted our deliveries. My restaurants are busier than ever—and yet we are all hanging on by a thread.Many of these industry problems were inevitable, as farms cut down on production during the pandemic and restaurant workers in search of a different lifestyle found jobs in other industries. Many of these issues were things we tried to address with the LEE Initiative. When the pandemic shut down restaurants in March 2020, we started opening relief kitchens to feed unemployed restaurant workers, not only because it was a need but because it was a way to acknowledge that all workers are essential. But it was impossible not to feel abandoned when you lose your job or get furloughed, and there is nowhere else to turn.Last summer we saw small farms suffering because they had no one else to sell their products to with so many restaurants shut down still. So we gave them grants to keep them in business and they gave their surplus ingredients to restaurants that were feeding their communities. I’m proud to say that every one of the 63 farms we helped is still in business, but all of them had to cut down on production not knowing what the future would hold.Now we are experiencing a pivotal time of upheaval and transition. The work of the LEE Initiative has always been about long term solutions of equity and diversity. And it is critical now more than ever to keep the work going of rebuilding our industry in a kinder, more transparent, and equitable manner. We keep p
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For a moment it was hot vax summer; then the vibe sort of shifted.Alberto Pezzali / AP; The AtlanticYou wouldn’t remember this, but at the end of June I was honestly on a dance floor under a disco ball, shoulder to shoulder with sweaty strangers, most of whom were singing “Dancing Queen,” and we were all vaccinated against the coronavirus, so we were nervous enough to say “Do you think this is okay?” but not nervous enough to leave. It was hot vax summer! Just like we were promised! When that first big night out of the house resulted in a strep-throat diagnosis, I didn’t find it ominous at all. No, it was cute: two days of antibiotics and I was ready to get drunk on the Fourth of July.Just a few weeks later, New York City was counting more than 1,000 new COVID-19 cases a day, and the primary topic of conversation in my social circle had turned to the season’s shifting vibes. The city’s energy was—some suggested—unsettling and weird. There were rumors of a “gay cold” circulating at Pride events, and then through a holiday cluster in Provincetown, Massachusetts. New York’s government started offering $100 bribes to get vaccinated, and its appeals took on a more desperate pitch. Over the span of a single week, Mayor Bill de Blasio went from touting the “summer of New York City” and rejecting the idea of any new mask mandates to acknowledging that the Delta variant has “changed the game.” (Meanwhile, his office is still planning to host a massive “homecoming” concert in Central Park on August 21.)Read: Hot vax summer crumbled before my eyesIf the hot vax summer hasn’t yet been canceled, it’s certainly under threat. With seven weeks to
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One of Britain’s leading universities is failing to stamp out bullying and harassment, some of its staff have said, after a college principal was allowed to remain in post despite complaints of intimidating behaviour towards colleagues.Prof Adekunle Adeyeye, the head of Durham University’s Trevelyan college, is alleged to have frequently reduced colleagues to tears and made sexist remarks.He stepped down from the university’s bullying policy committee after the Guardian approached him last week, but he is understood to remain in post as a college principal.Previously the Guardian has spoken to five former members of staff who say they experienced intimidating behaviour or misogynistic comments from Adeyeye, who joined the university in January 2020.Two people had filed formal grievances against him in a matter of 16 months and three have left over concerns about his manner.The institution’s University and College Union branch said in a statement on Thursday that the case highlighted “extremely important structural issues at Durham”, which has been dogged by complaints about bullying and harassment on campus.The union, which represents nearly current 1,300 academics and staff at the university, said: “While we can’t comment on this particular case while the proceedings are ongoing, there have been similar cases in the past.“It appears that the university has in many instances been reluctant to address the structural problems which have allowed bullying to tak
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Given the steep rise in economic inequality in many parts of the world since the 1980s, one might have expected to see increasing political demands for the redistribution of wealth and the return of class-based politics. This didn’t quite happen – or at least not straightforwardly. To make sense of the big picture, we studied the long-term evolution of political divides in 50 western and non-western democracies, using a new database on the vote that covers more than 300 elections held between 1948 and 2020.One of the most striking results that emerges from our analysis is what we propose to call the transition from “class-based party systems” to “multi-elite party systems” in western democracies. In the 1950s and 60s, the vote for leftwing parties in western democracies was “class-based”, in the sense that it was strongly associated with a lower income and less educated electorate. Since then, it has gradually become associated with more highly educated voters, giving rise in the 2010s to a remarkable divergence between the effect that income and education has on how people vote. People with high incomes continue to vote for the right while people with high levels of education (such as those with university degrees) have shifted to the left. This separation is visible in nearly all western democracies, despite their historical, political and institutional differences.What explains this remarkable transformation? First, the classic answer invokes the increasing prevalence of identity politics. As questions related to environmentalism, gender equality, the rights of sexual and ethnic minorities and, more recently, immigration have taken a growing importance in political debates, new green and anti-immigration parties have risen in the polls. While income continues to differentiate social democratic parties from conservative parties, it is education that most clearly distinguishes the supporters of green and anti-immigration parties today.A second mechanism that can potentially explain this long-run evolution has to do with the process of educational expansion itself. In the 1950s and 60s, the majority of voters had primary or secondary education at most. In this context, parties seeking to reduce social inequalities could simply aim to ensure everyone went through primary and secondary school. With the rise of tertiary education, things have become more complicated. Leftwing parties, which were once seen as defending greater equality of access to the education system, have increasingly been viewed as parties defending primarily the winners of the higher education game. This arguably contributed to growing resentment among those who do not benefit from it, and a shift of some of them towards anti-immigration parties or abstention. As a result, the voting bases of social democratic parties have become increasingly restricted to the most educated parts of the electorate.A third related mechanism involves the ascendancy of a global ideology that puts private property interests above all else, abandoning any sense that capitalism can be radically transformed. The moderation of traditional leftwing parties’ platforms since the 1980s
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Outside Tunisia, the president’s sacking of the prime minister and shutdown of parliament looked like a coup. Inside, however, activists and journalists are still struggling to define what is happening to their country – and what to do about it.“The day after the president acted, we had a conversation in the newsroom about whether it was a coup,” said Thameur Mekki, the editor-in-chief of the influential media platform Nawaat. Other news outlets aired programmes debating the “coup” question, and activist groups started worrying. But then, said Mekki, the president, Kais Saied, personally called leading civil society groups and “gave assurances about their freedom to operate”.“I don’t know what that is, but it’s not really a coup … People living through a coup don’t get to debate it on television.”For Mekki, the international approach to looking at Tunisia’s crisis has been lazy. The key context to the power grab, he said, was the dire situation in parliament. The president’s intervention was “risky, he said, “but we couldn’t continue with the parliament as it was. For Tunisians, it was a joke, incapable of respecting even its own laws.”Allegations against multiple lawmakers are widespread and longstanding. IWatch, the local anti-corruption watchdog, has published a list of MPs subject to outstanding legal action, or who have had prison sentences deferred because of their parliamentary immunity, which Saied has now withdrawn.On the list was Zouheir Makhlouf, who was photographed by a 19-year-old woman while parked outside a secondary school with his genitals exposed. Makhlouf has denied all subsequent charges, saying he was urinating into a bottle because he has diabetes.Kais Saied waves to bystanders as he strolls along the Avenue Habib Bourguiba in Tunis on 1 August. Photograph: Slim Abid/APSaied, meanwhile, says he acted under the constitution, which allows the head of state to take unspecified exceptional measures in the event of an “imminent threat”. The president acted after violent protests against Tunisia’s biggest party, the moderate Islamist Ennahda movement.Al Bawsala, an independent parliamentary watchdog, has backed what it said was the president’s legal right to assume his extraordinary powers under the constitution, but not to suspend parliament. Other leading civil society groups have given the president their cautious support, saying his actions remained within the law but that he urgently needed to present a route out of the crisis.Still, there have been worrying developments since the president’s move on parliament. A media union, the Syndicat National des Journalistes Tunisiens, (SNJT) reported a marked increase in assaults upon reporters, and protested about a raid on Al Jazeera’s office in Tunis.Human Rights Watch, writing two days after the president’s intervention, said it was dangerous, while Amnesty, which has a significant presence within Tunisia, urged Saied publicly to commit to protecting citizens’ rights.Activists in Tunisia bristle at reports of complicity, or indifference, to a crackdown on rights and freedoms. “We haven’t gone anywhere,” one activis
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Britain’s builders struggled to keep pace with the demand for new homes and maintenance work in July as shortages of materials and skilled staff slowed growth, according to a closely watched industry survey.After hitting a 24-year high in June, the construction industry last month grew at the slowest pace since February, after firms that had stockpiled materials in the first half of the year began to run low while others were unable to find enough workers to fulfil bulging order books.Analysts said the future looked rosy for much of the industry as the economy reopened and a consistently high level of growth was likely to re-establish itself once the pressure on supply lines began to ease.
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TOKYO (AP) — Of course, an Olympic medal has significance. But the bouquet of flowers that every medal winner is being handed at the Tokyo Olympics has deeper meaning. Much deeper. The sunflowers and all the other flowers in the bouquet were grown in the three northeastern Japanese prefectures that were devastated by the 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and the subsequent meltdown of three nuclear reactors. About 18,000 people died in the catastrophe that hit the prefectures of Iwate, Fukushima, and Miyagi. The recovery is still on-going from that day — March 11, 2011. Organizers had hoped the Olympics would promote the area. But the pandemic changed much of that and put the focus, inste
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Christina Animashaun/Vox “There’s just a lot of drama.”  By Aug 5, 2021, 7:30am EDT This story is part of Down to Earth, a Vox reporting initiative on the science, politics, and economics of the biodiversity crisis. In 2017, an evolutionary biologist named R. Alexander Pyron ignited controversy with a Washington Pos
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Billionaire Donald Bren was behind a quiet $100m donation in 2013 that established Caltech's Space-based Solar Power Project (SSPP) in an attempt to harness solar power from outer space, the California private research university revealed this week. The real estate magnate was inspired by a 2011 article in Popular Science (perhaps this one?). He also knew a thing or two concerning power distribution problems from his experience master planning cities like Irvine, California. Bren subsequently approached Caltech to discuss his ideas. Caltech said he has no stake in the tech and won't make any money from it. The donation is being disclosed now, eight years later, as SSPP wants to highlight up
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The number of self-isolation alerts sent out by the NHS Covid app has fallen by 43% in a week, government figures show.A total of 395,971 alerts were sent in the week to 28 July telling people in England and Wales they had been in close contact with someone who had tested positive for coronavirus – down from 690,129 the week before.The large decrease has been matched by a decline in the number of recorded cases over the same period. A total of 189,232 people tested positive for Covid-19 in England at least once in the week to 28 July, down 39% on the previous week, according to the latest Test-and-Trace figures.The number of check-ins to venues using the app also fell. There were 2.4m chec
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August 4, 2021 | 1:23pm | Updated August 4, 2021 | 2:16pm A top communications manager at Facebook helped Gov. Andrew Cuomo fight sexual misconduct allegations — including by helping leak confidential files about accuser Lindsey Boylan and by participating in regular discussions about Cuomo’s communications strategy, according to the New York attorney general’s bombshell investigation.  Dani Lever — who had worked in Cuomo’s press operation since 2014 but left in August 2020 to join Facebook as a communications manager — played a key role in Cuomo’s communications strategy even while worki
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A few minutes after he had finished skating in the Olympics, Dallas Oberholzer, 46, from Durban, South Africa, launched into a story about the time he was nearly eaten by a jaguar while he was travelling in the Amazon.“I was driving a little jeep and I got stuck in the mud, I tried putting my skateboard under the wheels but that didn’t work, so I was looking for some wood and I walked off and found this little hut down the track. There were white droppings outside so I knew there was a meat-eater around and then when I walked in the door I saw this jaguar and oh, shit, this was clearly its lair, so I let rip, roared like some Tarzan crazy man, to let the thing know I was something to be reckoned with, and luckily it bolted out the back. So I just stood there and thought: ‘Oh shit that thing could have killed me, and then: ‘Oh shit, I’m glad I’ve seen it.’ And then I walked 5km to the road to hitch a truck to come pull me out of the mud.”Oberholzer says he has never had a proper job. But he does have a lot of these stories. He is thinking about putting them down in a book. There’s the one about paragliding off the sugar loaf mountain. And the time he worked as a chauffeur for Janet Jackson. And the other when he walked into a Zulu village, stony broke but with his skateboard, and started teaching tricks to the kids. “They liked it so much they ended up giving me a piece of land, and if I didn’t have that I would probably be on the streets.” He still lives there, off and on, “I’m the only white person for a 30km radius and the rest of South Africa thinks I’m crazy.”Now Oberholzer has the tale about the time he competed in the Olympics, too. He said it’s as good as any of them. “Oh for sure, man, especially at my age, and given how unexpected this all was, I mean, I’m only here because I heard this was coming around about six years ago, and I thought to myself: ‘well I’ve got nothing else to do, so let’s stick it.’” He finished last in his heat. He didn’t care.Oberholzer, who has a salt and pepper beard, and was wearing a Zebra print shirt (“my same old rig”), demonstrated a slow, leisurely style of park skating, which felt like something from another era when it was set next to teenage acrobatics of the kids he was competing with. The winner, Australia’s Keegan Palmer, is 18. “At my age I’m not going for gold,” Oberholzer said, “It wasn’t like: ‘Oh my God it’s the Olympics’, it was just another fun skate session. I’m out there acknowledging other people’s successes. And I’m used to hanging out with 14-year-olds, they’re like my skateboarding family.”When Oberholzer was that age himself, he never imagined skating would take him to the Olympics. “It was taboo, it was frowned upon, it was a waste of time,” he says. “When I chose skateboarding over mainstream sports everybody would look at me like a freak, well skateboarding was a bit of a freak show, so that became my safe space.” Even now, he says, people still say to him “dude, you’re still skateboarding? Really?”He wasn’t quite the oldest man in the field. That was Rune Glifberg, from Denmark. Glif
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And Lost in Harmony developer DigixArt. Embracer Group - the parent company of THQ Nordic, Saber Interactive, Koch Media and Gearbox - has added another eight studios to its bulging collection. Notably, this includes Duke Nukem studio 3D Realms, which currently has six new projects in the works. It, alongside support studio and fellow Danish outfit Slipgate Ironworks, will be folded into Saber.Lost in Harmony and 11-11 Memories Retold developer DigixArt will be folded into Koch Media, meanwhil
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Descriptions of Cole Porter’s Anything Goes seem to pour out in drink metaphors: it’s sparkling, bubbly, a tonic. It’s certainly got the giddy hopefulness of the night’s first champagne bottle popped, suspended in that state when the world is full of bright delight and possibility. The auditorium is fizzing, too, a buoyantly full house. This 1934 show is Depression-era escapism fit for post-Covid times. If you want to remove yourself from the world for a few hours, this is the place to do it.The genius of Anything Goes lies in the combination of seriously good music with a plot so glor
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TOKYO (AP) — Ryan Crouser wrote the note and brought it to the stadium just in case. “Grandpa. We did it. 2020 Olympic champion!” it said. The world’s best shot putter had a feeling he’d win. After he did just that on Thursday, he pulled out that piece of paper and showed it to the world. Crouser’s second straight Olympic gold medal was a tribute to his grandfather, Larry, who died shortly before Crouser left for Tokyo. “To lose him the week before the Olympics was obviously sad,” Crouser said. “But I feel like he was able to be here in spirit.”  It was years ago in Larry Crouser’s backyard that Ryan attempted his first toss with the heavy metal ball that would shape his life. What a journey it produced. Crouser has seen the world thanks to that shot put. Dominated it, too. He set the world record earlier this summer at the Olympic trials. On Thursday, he raised his own Olympic record as well, to 23.30 meters (76 feet, 5½ inches). He earned the first track and field gold medal for the American men at the Tokyo Games, coming later than anyone expected — on Day 7 of the meet. It was too late for his grandpa to see it, though Crouser and his family have a feeling he knows. “The same time that you’re cheering the most fantastic thing, there’s just that little bit of, ‘I wish grandpa was here,’” said Ryan’s mom, Lisa, while celebrating at a watch party back in Redmond, Oregon. “You know he’s watching.” On Crouser’s big day, U.S. teammate Joe Kovacs finished second and Tomas Walsh of New Zealand was third. That was the exact same podium as five years ago at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics. It marks the first time in any Olympic individual track and field event that there’s been a repeat podium in back-to-back Summer Games — the same three athletes in the exact same positions, according to Olympic historian Bill Mallon. “We just keep pushing each other,” said Kovacs, the 2019 world champion whose farthest toss was 22.65. Crouser’s childhood throws in his grandfather’s backyard were unpredictable at times. Once, he lobbed one through the top of the garden shed. “I went back the next day and replaced that,” Crouser said. Time marched on. Eventually, Larry Crouser lost his hearing. Ryan started writing notes. “They had a letter correspondence going back and forth,” his mother explained. The last one might have been the most important. Crouser put pen to paper in his room a few days ago to calm his nerves. Not so much about the event — he wasn’t nervous — but about possibly testing positive for the coronavirus. The positive test that knocked pole vaulter Sam Kendricks out of the Olympics rattled him. Even for the world record-holder and defending champion, the note was something of a leap of faith. But Crouser figured that, at worst, no one would ever find out about it. Turns out, he was spot-on. After the win, he proudly displayed it as he paraded around in his cowboy hat. Crouser’s grandpa was alive June 18 to see him break a 31-year-old world record at the U.S. Olympic trials. “He watched that throw on the iPad, thousands and thousands of times,” Crouser said.
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Sebastian Coe, world track’s leader, has spent the past five years pushing his vision of a level playing field. Critics say he is violating athletes’ human rights.Credit...Tytus Zmijewski/EPA, via ShutterstockPublished July 30, 2021Updated Aug. 5, 2021, 7:09 a.m. ETFor six years, Sebastian Coe, the president of track and field’s world governing body, has been fighting a battle.Coe, a two-time gold medalist in the 1,500 meters and a former member of the British Parliament, has been on a mission to uphold his vision of a level playing field, even if that put him at odds with increasingly vocal advocates for inclusion.For decades, track and field, which moved to center stage at the Tokyo Olympics when it began on Friday, has focused on doping as its primary existential threat. But a broader understanding of identity in recent years has forced track officials to confront more complex and ambiguous questions, like how society should accommodate the disabled, and what determines gender identity.Coe, who became president of track’s governing body, World Athletics, in 2015, said his predecessors ignored the issue for years, and he had no intention of doing the same. He knew his efforts would force him to make enemies of athletes who have garnered widespread empathy, support and admiration, including runners born without fully functioning legs and women with naturally elevated testosterone levels.“Accessibility and fair competition are not always compatible, and when they aren’t, fair competition has to be the overriding principle,” Coe said in an interview earlier this month, two weeks before the start of the Games.The debate, he said, always returned to a singular question: “What do we need to do to maintain the integrity of sport?”ImageCredit...Charly Triballeau/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesCoe’s vision will be on display during the next nine days in Tokyo. The Olympic track and field meet and road racing events have plenty of stars, including Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, the Jamaican sprinter, and Eliud Kipchoge, the Kenyan marathoner. But the competition also will be notable for a few athletes who will be absent.Blake Leeper of the United States, a double-amputee athlete who competes in the 400 meters on running blades that World Athletics deemed too long, and Caster Semenya of South Africa, who has won two Olympic gold medals and three world championships at 800 meters, could not qualify under rules they have claimed are unfair.Several other female middle distance runners with naturally elevated testosterone levels also will miss the competition. World Athletics has banned those runners from competing against other women in events between 400 meters and the mile — distances at which researchers say their biology gives them an unfair advantage — unless they suppress their elevated hormone levels medically.Earlier this month, Namibia removed two of the world’s top female 400-meter runners from its Olympic roster at that distance after medical tests revealed they had natural testosterone levels above the allowable threshold. The runners, Christine Mboma and Beatrice Masilingi, both 18, are instead focusing on the 200 m
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The second Fredo album in the space of six months begins in portentous style. There’s a reading of an extract from an 1852 speech given by the former slave and abolitionist Frederick Douglass – a speech that contrasted the celebration of “freedom” on 4 July with the lot of the slave – followed by a churchy sounding organ playing a figure that distinctly recalls Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D minor. “I know labels don’t want it to end this way,” offers the rapper on the chorus, “but I had to tell them it’s independence day.”It’s the kind of bullish declaration of freedom an artist might make had they recently quit, or been dropped by, a major label: a new beginning, free from the interference of A&R men and bean-counters suggesting you round your edges and demanding to know where the next hit is. But the advance stream of Independence Day arrives from Sony, bearing the logo of RCA, which has released every preceding Fredo album.So it clearly isn’t about that. Perhaps it’s linked to the events of the last 12 months in Fredo’s career: 2020 represented a sticky creative patch for an artist who had previously scored two Top 5 albums and a string of hit singles, including the chart-topping collaboration with Dave, Funky Friday. The problem was the single Hickory Dickory Dock. It wasn’t entirely clear whether its “rock it, rock it, mosh pit, mosh pit” refrain was Fredo trying to come up with something designed to be meme-able on TikTok, along the lines of Drake’s Toosie Slide, but whatever his intention, it got a very frosty reception both critically – “what is this shit?” demanded one reaction vlog – and commercially. The track disappeared from streaming services, Fredo disowned it – dismissing it, along with hits he’d released in 2020 with Mist and Young T & Bugsey, as “pop shit”. Tellingly, his next single was called Back to Basics.His subsequent album, Money Can’t Buy Happiness, was a well-received hit, but clearly the opprobrium he endured still rankles (“They say I fell off,” he complains on Freestyle, “them man there are hella haters”), as does the suggestion that he leaned into a more commercial sound at the behest of his label, hence, presumably, Independence Day’s opening.The artwork for Fredo’s Independence DayThe rest of the album seems even more stark than its predecessor, a doubling-down on core values. There’s certainly nothing here like the Auto-Tune-heavy vocals of Do You Right, or the Fugees-sampling Ready. The closest it comes to the latter’s soulful chorus are the disembodied vocal samples that float around Skinny N****s, a track on which Fredo pledges to dial down the braggadocio about his wealth a little: “Thought I was slipping away rapping about them glittery chains … I got to go hard”. It largely deals in dark-hued samples – horror-movie chimes on Mind, sombre piano on My Mother’s Life – over trap beats and lurching bass. That isn’t to say the production isn’t creative. If you are keen for your music to get some action on TikTok, Double Tap’s ghostly repurposing of a vocal from Hayloft by Mother Mother – a minor Canadian indie band u
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The Bank of England has kept UK interest rates at the historic low of 0.1% despite predicting a stronger recovery this year from the pandemic that will push inflation higher than previously expected.Central bank policymakers predicted that UK inflation would rise to 4% by the end of this year, double their target, up from 2.5% in June, largely due to higher energy and other goods prices.But they resisted pressure to increase the cost of borrowing to calm rising prices, saying the increase in inflation this year would prove temporary and was expected to fall back towards a 2% target next year.“CPI inflation has risen markedly, to above the monetary policy committee’s target of 2%, and is
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As part of our coverage of the Covid-19 pandemic in the UK, we would like to hear from people who have tested positive for the virus in recent weeks. Do you know how or where you were infected? What is the situation like now?Share your experiencesYou can get in touch by filling in the form below, anonymously if you wish or via WhatsApp by clicking here or adding the contact +44(0)7766780300. Your responses are secure as the form is encrypted and only the Guardian has access to your contributions.One of our journalists will be in contact before we publish, so please do leave contact details.If you’re having trouble using the form, click here. Read terms of service here and privacy policy he
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Guardian writers’ predicted position: 8th (NB: this is not necessarily Andy Hunter’s prediction but the average of our writers’ tips)Last season’s position: 10thOdds to win the league (via Oddschecker): 100-1The plan“To put it simply, we need to be competing at the top end of the league and to be winning trophies.”Farhad Moshiri made clear what he expects from Everton when explaining in June why he had pushed through the appointment of Rafael Benítez as the club’s fifth permanent manager in five years. There was also an undisguised brusqueness to the majority shareholder’s comments that could be surmised as follows: I know this is an unpopular choice but Carlo Ancelotti has
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We spend a lot of time thinking of how to create 3D objects, but what about being able to print full color graphics on the objects we create? This isn’t just multicolor, this is full-color! Here’s one elegant solution that uses ink jets to print full color images on 3D terrain models. Admittedly we are very late to the party on this one as the technology was spotted on season 22, episode 7 of How It’s Made that aired way back in 2013. The segment shows terrain models — think of the physical contour map under glass that you might see at a National Park or at the main lodge of a ski resort. It’s easy enough to envision how the elevation is carved out of foam by a
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Are environmental crusaders like Douglas Tompkins good for the planet?Douglas Tompkins reached the summit of Mount Fitz Roy on December 20, 1968. (Chris Jones)This article was published online on August 5, 2021.Patagonia as many of us imagine it was born in 1968. That year, the vast region of South America became an exotic destination for outdoor adventure. Of course, residents of Chile and Argentina did not need their backyard discovered any more than Native Americans needed Christopher Columbus. But to a group of young men in California, the landscape held a mystical appeal. That summer they set out by van to drive 16,000 miles southward, drawn by the peak of Fitz Roy, a forbidding mountai
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In the film, edgy shock value meets Hollywood sentimentality, resulting in a superhero movie unlike most others in the genre.Warner Bros.The Suicide Squad might seem like a typical superhero movie at first: Yet another group of powerful comic-book characters is thrown together to fight insurmountable odds on a mysterious, deadly mission. Audiences will recognize a few faces from the last (horrendous) Suicide Squad film, such as that of the chipper criminal Harley Quinn (played by Margot Robbie). But much of the fun comes from trying to puzzle out who the newcomers are, including a costumed hunk named T.D.K. (Nathan Fillion). When someone asks him what T.D.K. stands for, he replies, “It doe
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A "left-wing" German infosec researcher was this week threatened with criminal prosecution after revealing that an app used by Angela Merkel's political party to canvass voters was secretly collecting personal data. Germany's respected Chaos Computer Club (CCC) announced it would stop reporting any weaknesses in the centre-right wing Christian Democratic Union's (CDU) web-facing infrastructure to the party after it procured a criminal prosecution against Lilith Wittmann. "I got an email from the Cyber Security Police of Berlin," she told The Register. "Could you please provide us your address, so we can send you... legal documents? And then I was like, that's weird. I didn't do anything wrong. Let's tweet about that. Let's find a lawyer who can look into that." Although the prosecution is due to be withdrawn after an apology from the CDU, the episode shines a light on some German politicians' attitudes to vulnerability disclosures. In May, during federal elections in Germany, the CDU equipped its door-knocking activists with an app called CDU Connect. The app was used for recording data on homeowners: did they welcome political activists knocking on their doors to find out who they were going to vote for? Did they shoo the CDU's foot soldiers away, or did they invite them in for a cuppa and a chat? At the time, Wittmann told us, the CDU insisted that data collected in the app was anonymous. This was incorrect, Wittmann said. The researcher revealed her findings in a blog post (auf Deutsch), explaining on a phone call with The Register that all she did was sniff an API token, "man in the middle" style, "to figure out how the API works." Having done that, she discovered personal data was indeed being processed by the app. The perils of non-disclosure? China 'cloned and used' NSA zero-day exploit for years before it was made public C'mon, biz: Give white hats a chance to tell you how screwed you are Google, Facebook, Chaos Computer Club join forces to oppose German state spyware After Wittmann reported the exploitable vulns to the CDU, the party shut down CDU Connect. There was, so the infosec researcher said, no specific agreemen
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Yelp will let businesses share their policies on COVID-19 vaccinations, the company announced today. There are a pair of new attributes businesses can add to their profiles; one to share whether their staff are fully vaccinated, and one to specify whether customers will be required to provide proof of vaccination. Businesses can list the attributes via their Yelp for Business accounts. allowing users of the service to find places with policies they’re most comfortable with. The ability to list vaccination policies joins a long list of pandemic-focused features Yelp has added to its service over the past year. Early on in the pandemic, the service let businesses specify whether they offer virtual or contact-free services, and later expanded this to other safety measures like whether they offer outdoor dining, or have a face masks policy for staff. Businesses can add the attributes via their Yelp for Business account. Image: Yelp But some of Yelp’s attempts to help businesses during the pandemic have been less warmly received. In March last year it was forced to reverse a controversial decision to automatically add fundraisers to the pages of tens
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Little can be done to change the minds of the 30% of American adults yet to get jabbedTHE CORONAVIRUS is upending daily life in America once again. Cases have risen in all states over the past 14 days owing to the spread of the Delta variant. In Florida, where the rate of new infections is second highest, hospitals have more covid-19 patients than ever. Deaths have risen in 30 states over the past two weeks, typically in places with the lowest rates of fully vaccinated people. Although the country has met President Joe Biden’s target of giving at least one dose to 70% of its adult population, it did so a month late.The Economist TodayHand-picked stories, in your inboxA daily email with the best of our journalismAmerica is in danger of undoing the early progress of its vaccination programme. On March 1st, about ten weeks after mass vaccinations began, the country had given out 0.27 doses for every person aged 12 and over. That rate was surpassed by only five other countries, Israel and Britain among them. The steady progress of jabs, along with declining infection rates, prompted the CDC to recommend that masks no longer be required indoors for the fully vaccinated from May 13th. By Independence Day, on July 4th, Mr Biden announced that although covid-19 was not “vanquished” the country was nearing independence from the virus.Mr Biden told his fellow Americans that getting vaccinated was “the most patriotic thing you can do”, but they appear not to be listening. Since the beginning of July vaccination rates in America have fallen markedly. The country has slipped down the global league table for vaccinations, to 28th on August 3rd. America has now given an average of 1.2 doses per person to its population aged 12 and over. But over the past 14 days it has administered on average 2.2 doses per 1,000 people per day, slower than the pace in 112 other countries. Granted, vaccination rates in most countries have slowed as more and more of their citizens are jabbed (see chart above). But neighbouring Canada—a country of similar wealth and geography—has already given 1.5 doses per person aged 12 and over, on average, and is still administering 8.4 per 1,00
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Nearly 72,000 children tested positive for COVID-19 last week, a “substantial” increase that troubles public health advocates amid the growing wave of infections linked to the highly transmissible delta variant of the virus. The American Academy of Pediatrics released the figures on Tuesday, noting they were a nearly 85% increase from a week earlier. Children — defined by individual states as those aged 17 or 18 and under ― now account for 19% of the nation’s weekly COVID-19 cases. More than 4.2 million children have tested positive for the coronavirus since the pandemic began. The data is troubling as many children are not yet eligible for a coronavirus vaccine. Those used in the United States are only authorized for people aged 12 and over, but many schools are preparing to hold in-person classes in the fall for the first time since the pandemic took hold last year. The American Academy of Pediatrics noted that severe illness and hospitalization remained uncommon among children. Top vaccine makers are testing their products on children as young as 6 months old, but emergency use authorization is still months away. “There is an urgent need to collect more data on longer-term impacts of the pandemic on children, including ways the virus may harm the long-term physical health of infected children, as well as its emotional and mental health effects,” the group said. A recent study from scientists in London found that children who are infected with the coronavirus rarely develop long-term illnesses, known colloquially as “long COVID,” suggesting the issue may be more frequent in adults. Researchers found just 4.4% of kids have symptoms that last for four weeks or longer, and just 1.8% have illnesses that go on for more than eight weeks. The report comes less than two weeks after the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended all kids over the age of 2 wear face masks in school this fall, regardless of vaccination status, citing the delta variant. Vaccines remain the best defense against severe cases of COVID-19 and death associated with the disease, and studies show that all vaccines used in the U.S. protect well against the delta strain. A
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In a bold move that certainly didn't pay off, a pair of PlayStation 5 development kits appeared on eBay yesterday - although the listings didn't last more than a few hours before being removed. As spotted by Twitter user iDCx1337, the listings were for a DFI-D1000AA dev kit and a DFI-T1000AA test kit (thanks, Kotaku). A screenshot of the DFI-D1000AA dev kit, complete with two all-black DualSense controllers, showed that the listing apparently reached a bidding price of €2850 (£2423) before being pulled. PlayStation 5 Teardown Analysis: Inside Sony's Next Generation Hardware Design It remains unclear whether eBay decided to remove the listings or whether Sony got involved, but either way, the listings apparently only survived a few hours before
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Nintendo has now shifted 89.04m Switch consoles worldwide as of 30th June, though sales have slowed compared to this time last year. Shipments of the main Switch console actually increased year-on-year, though a fall for the Switch Lite model offset that, leading to an overall decrease for the last quarter of 21.7 percent. In its latest earnings briefing, Nintendo pointed to last year's sales boom "substantially driven" by Animal Crossing: New Horizons as providing tough comparisons. A further 45.28m Switch games have been sold, including 2.07m copies of New Pokémon Snap, 1.34m copies of Mario Golf: Super Rush and 1.04m copies of Miitopia.Sales of evergreen games such as Mario Kart 8 Deluxe and Animal Crossing continued to tick upwards, to 37.08m
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HACKING THE HACKERS — New exploit available for download lets hackers crash Cobalt Strike Team Servers. Enlarge / You did a bad bad thing.Governments, vigilantes, and criminal hackers have a new way to disrupt botnets running the widely used attack software Cobalt Strike, courtesy of research published on Wednesday. Cobalt Strike is a legitimate security tool used by penetration testers to emulate malicious activity in a network. Over the past few years, malicious hackers—working on behalf of a nation-state or in search of profit—have increasingly embraced the software. For both defender and attacker, Cobalt Strike provides a soup-to-nuts collection of software packages that allow infected computers and attacker servers to interact in highly customizable ways. The main components of the security tool are the Cobalt Strike client—also known as a Beacon—and the Cobalt Strike Team Server, which sends commands to infected computers and receives the data they exfiltrate. An attacker starts by spinning up a machine running Team Server that has been
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→ Listen to this story on Racket.It was a plaything for the wealthy, a tool for the powerful, hailed as a democratic gift to humanity.It was geeky, technical, jargonistic. You’d debate the merits of the smallest changes, remix and reinvent, preorder the latest model months in advance, then watch the shipping date slip further into the future.It spurred innovators to greatness and grandiose. “There are no imaginable limits to our opportunities,” a government commissioner would enthuse.” “I aim at Tesla,” said the self-styled father of this new technology.It would bring the best of times; nothing else could possibly “touch the lives of all people more intimately,” as one put it. It’d also bring the worst of times; it could “suppress and distort fact,” even “stir up mob violence,” another worried.We were promised driverless vehicles a century ago, and all we got was the radio.Into the etherIt started out as a spark. We’d tamed lightening, as our ancestors had tamed fire. We’d brightened the darkness, built the first automobiles, sent messages on wires coast to coast.“Do you think there is a limit to the possibility of electricity?” Thomas Edison was asked in 1896. “No,” replied Edison, “I do not.”Edison then fretted that the next innovations might not surprise us; “Nothing now seems to be too great for the people to comprehend.”He needn’t have worried. “Tesla foretold of a day,” Thomas S. W. Lewis wrote of Edison’s archrival, “the seemingly magic electrons would enable messages and sounds to be sent across great distances without wires.” That’d spark the next gene
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Facebook is being criticized by politicians and researchers for banning the accounts of academics who analyzed political ads and misinformation on the social network. In press statements, Senator Mark R. Warner (D-VA) said the company’s actions were “deeply concerning,” while Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) said she was “deeply troubled” by the news. Creator of the Firefox browser, Mozilla, which conducted a privacy audit of the academics’ work, said Facebook’s justification for banning the researchers was “wrong.” “Facebook claims the accounts were shut down due to privacy problems with the Ad Observer,” wrote Mozilla’s chief security officer Marshall Erwin in a blog post. “In our view, those claims simply do not hold water.” The academics banned by Facebook worked with the NYU Ad Observatory, creating a browser plug-in called Ad Observer that Facebook users could install to collect data about what political ads they were shown and how they were targeted. Facebook does not provide equivalent information, says the NYU Ad Observatory, not least because, as the researchers have shown, the company sometimes fails to label political ads at all. Facebook has defended its ban of NYU Ad Observatory accounts and pages by saying it’s protecting users’ privacy. It’s a not-unreasonable argument given that the Cambridge Analytica scandal sprung from third-party researchers scraping the site for user data. But critics say Facebook has got the details wr
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TOKYO (AP) — Tokyo reported 5,042 new daily coronavirus cases on Thursday, hitting a record since the pandemic began as the infections surge in the Japanese capital hosting the Olympics. The additional cases brought the total for Tokyo to 236,138, about a quarter of the national total. Japan reported more than 14,000 cases on Wednesday for a total of 970,000. Tokyo has been under a state of emergency since mid-July, and four other areas have since been added and extended until Aug. 31. But the measures, basically a ban on alcohol in restaurants and bars and their shorter hours, are increasi
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The former Great British Bake Off winner John Whaite will compete in Strictly Come Dancing’s first all-male partnership.The 33-year-old chef is the fourth contestant to be confirmed for the next series of the BBC One show.It is the second time that the show has featuring a same-sex pairing, after the boxer Nicola Adams and the professional dancer Katya Jones formed its first female same-sex dance pairing last year. The Olympic gold medalist and her dance partner were forced to pull out of the 2020 competition five weeks in, however, after Jones tested positive for Covid-19.Whaite said: “I
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The installation features figures dotted among the trees and explores the relationship between man and nature. Photograph: Jason deCaires Taylor/Musan
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As a marine biologist who has studied the effects of extreme weather events for decades, I expected it would be bad. The ‘heat dome’ brought record high air temperatures to the Pacific north-west, and for the plants and animals living along our extensive coastlines the late June timing could not have been worse. The scorching heatwave coincided with some of the lowest daytime tides of the year, leaving tidal lands exposed to hot air and sun for hours during the hottest part of the day, several days in a row.And bad it was. In the days immediately after the historic heatwave, I visited shorelines that looked and smelled like death. Mussel, oyster and clam shells open wide with rotting tissue exposed, snails and chitons no longer able to cling to the rock, kelp and surfgrass bleached whi
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On 19 July, Ben & Jerry’s, the celebrated ice cream company based in Vermont, where I live, set off a firestorm after it announced it would no longer allow its ice cream to be sold in Israel’s illegal settlements in the occupied West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and would not renew its licensing agreement with its franchise in Israel beyond next year. The company said that continuing to sell ice cream in the occupied Palestinian territory would be “inconsistent” with its values. I spent the last decade organizing with fellow activists in Vermont to convince Ben & Jerry’s to end its business in Israel’s settlements. The company’s statement, therefore, was a welcome step towards a more just world. But this principled decision was met with a barrage of baseless accusations of
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Look at all of our tech billionaires trying to leave the world to evade responsibility for their malevolent influence on it. Anything to avoid being confronted by the workers they exploit or the victims of the ethnic and religious clashes facilitated by their platforms. Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson are flinging themselves into space; Elon Musk is burrowing into the earth; now Mark Zuckerberg is retreating into a virtual “metaverse”.What is a metaverse, you ask? Well, late last year a former Facebook data scientist, Sophie Zhang, accused the company of having known about - and failed to prevent – attempts by heads of state and other political actors in Honduras, India, Azerbaijan, and elsewhere to manipulate and mislead their populations, leading to political instability, the harass
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New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy (D) minced no words when anti-vaxxers heckled him during a press conference in Union City on Wednesday. Murphy slammed a small group protesting mandatory inoculations as “the ultimate knuckleheads.” They were carrying signs that read “No forced injections” and “My body, my choice,” reported NorthJersey.com. “These folks back there have lost their minds,” said Murphy, who’d urged people to get vaccinated during his announcement of the state’s extension of its eviction moratorium. “You are the ultimate knuckleheads and because of what you are saying and standing for, people are losing their life,” the governor continued. “People are losing their life, and you have to know that. Look in the mirror. Look in the mirror.” Watch the video h
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Megan Rapinoe, one of the U.S. soccer stars in the twilight of her career, turned in a vintage performance to help the team salvage a glimmer of redemption at the Tokyo Olympics on Thursday. She scored two spectacular goals in a 4-3 victory over Australia in the bronze-medal game, giving the U.S. women’s squad its first third-place finish in the Summer Games. Carli Lloyd added two goals in what will likely be the last Olympics for both all-time greats. The squad was expected to win its fifth Olympic gold and become the first team to come out on top as the reigning World Cup champs. But uninspired play and a sputtering attack through much of the tournament left them to play for bronze. Rapinoe bent in an incredible corner kick in the 8th minute put the U.S. on top, 1-0. — #TokyoOlympic
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Kwayet is an internal communication app exclusively for your team or workplace. You can collaborate, call and message anyone without requiring a phone number.
- Phone
Privately call and message anyone inside or outside your team. Phone is like a phonebook for your team or workplace, it's a listing where you can easily find and reach anyone by their name, designation, unit, etc.
- Work
Create a group chat to accomplish a project, task or goal. Anyone in a group can schedule a meeting with a choice of venue such as Google Meet, Zoom etc or join one. You can also let your peers know how they are performing on a project and how they can improve by sending them an anonymous appraisal.
Kwayet
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Jorge Luis Borges’s short story “Borges and I” is typical of the writer. Erudite and elliptical, succinct and self-referential, passionate and puzzling. In just a few closely packed pages, the Argentinian essayist and master storyteller links the prose of Robert Louis Stevenson with the soul of Julius Caesar, via London brothels and arched entrance halls, past strumming guitars and sword-slain kings, before ending at the feet of God himself. “I have dreamt the world as you dreamt your work, my Shakespeare, and among the forms in my dream are you, who like myself are many and no one.” So speaks the Lord from a whirlwind. Or is it Borges from his desk? Either way, “discuss”.In this endearing, joyous, sharply written book, Jay Parini sets out to do precisely that: to take up his
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Labour has lost the last four general elections. From the death throes of New Labour in 2010 to the implosion of Corbynism in 2019 and Ed Miliband in between, the party has been out of power for 11 years now, and it falls to Keir Starmer to try to reverse that trend.The party has an identity crisis that reflects a changing class composition across demographic and geographic divides. In Scotland, the rise of Scottish nationalism and a Conservative unionist counterweight appears to have closed the door on Labour winning the sort of landslide the party used to take for granted, even in its dismal defeat in 2010. No wing of the party, in Westminster or Holyrood, has yet found an answer to that conundrum. These challenges are significant, but they are not insurmountable. If Labour is to win aga
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Winning tip: all steamed up, DorsetThe Great Dorset Steam Fair in Tarrant Hinton (returning 25-29 August 2022) is the ultimate country fair in my opinion. Covering over 240 hectares (600 acres), it’s the size of a small town. There is a vast spread of attractions, from working traction engines and vintage farm machinery to huge craft tents to motorcycle stunt displays to live music and much more. Peruse rows of trade stalls, take a ride at the fairground or listen to some of the many fairground organs, playing everything from traditional tunes to Abba hits. Alluring aromas will draw you into the food hall marquees, where you will be spoiled for choice.Sharon PinnerHighlands in Hertfordshire Photograph: Jonathan Ball/AlamyThe Harpenden Highland Gathering opens (on 12 September) with pomp
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Myanmar’s diplomats in the U.S. and at the UN moved to oppose a coup—and found themselves in limbo.NEW YORK—The Hunger Games–style salute Kyaw Moe Tun held in the air during perhaps the defining moment of his life was not exactly correct, his teenage daughter chided him later: His three fingers, she noted, were meant to be together, not spread apart, as he had raised them. His voice had also quivered and cracked as he spoke, the words tumbling out as he glanced nervously down at the text of his prepared statement again and again.He could be forgiven for his imprecise pop-culture references and imperfect rhetorical skills: Five months ago, Kyaw Moe Tun had made a decision that he knew would upend his life and that of his family. It would cost him his career and, potentially, his fre
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A pandemic puppy can increase your well-being—if you choose one for the right reasons.Jan Buchczik“How to Build a Life” is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness.Despite early-pandemic predictions of a deep, prolonged recession, much of the American and world economies are on fire. Housing in particular is booming; house prices increased more than 19 percent from May 2020 to May 2021. Used cars have surged in price by more than 21 percent over the past year, and air travel has roared back so strongly that the nation is facing a shortage of pilots. But all of that pales in comparison with the puppy bubble.According to PuppySpot (a web-based dog broker), the price of purebred puppies rose by 36 percent in 2020. About 12.6 million U.S. households g
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WPP, the world’s biggest advertising group, has grown its revenues back to pre-pandemic levels a year sooner than expected because of a record-setting rebound in global marketing spend.WPP reported that underlying revenues increased by 19.3% in the second quarter, the fastest rate of growth the company has ever recorded, with clients ploughing money into advertising and marketing as the post-pandemic business recovery continued apace.The group, which raised its full-year guidance after beating City expectations, reported a 16% rise in like-for-like revenues to £6.1bn in the first half of the year.“We are very pleased,” said Mark Read, the chief executive at WPP. “We expect momentum to continue in the second half of the year. “We have returned to 2019 levels in 2021, a year ahead
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The coronavirus pandemic has hit a new ― and bleak ― milestone. According to data released Monday by Johns Hopkins’ Coronavirus Resource Center, more than 200 million people have been infected with COVID-19 worldwide. To date, more than 4.2 million people have died from the virus, a staggering figure that includes more than 614,000 Americans, 558,000 Brazilians and at least 425,000 people in India. It is important to remember that those figures are only the known accounts of infections and deaths associated with COVID-19. Various studies have estimated that the true toll of the pandemic is much higher in some areas. In India, for example, experts told The New York Times in May that the official death toll could be one-half, one-fifth or even less than one-tenth of the actual figure, which may never be known. It took about 12 months for the coronavirus to infect the first 100 million people worldwide; the next 100 million were infected in just a six-month time frame. Although access to vaccines had alleviated a crush of infections in many rich nations, new cases have begun to skyrocket once again, mainly due to the highly transmissible delta variant infecting the unvaccinated. In the past month, every state in the U.S. has seen infections rise. According to White House pandemic response coordinator Jeff Zients, Texas and Florida accounted for a full one-third of all new cases nationwide last week. In Louisiana, where vaccination rates are low, public health officials warned this week that the state’s largest hospital was running out of beds, calling it the “darkest” time of pandemic thus far.  The Biden administration is working to combat ongoing hesi
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Meet the new Tokyo Olympic men’s shot podium. Same as the old one. Ryan Crouser, US, gold. Joe Kovacs, US, silver. Tomas Walsh, New Zealand, bronze.It doesn’t sound that unusual. But it was the first time in the 125-year history of the Olympics that the podium was the same in any individual event – with the same athletes sitting in the same spots for consecutive Olympic Games.There was an Olympic record, too, as Crouser threw 23.30m - only eight centimetres short of his world record – to break his old best set in Rio 2016. And afterwards he held up a note to his late grandfather, who died a day before he left for Tokyo.“He got me started throwing,” he said. “I threw in his yard until eighth grade. The day before I had to leave I threw a shot, and it went right through the roof of his garden shed, so I had to go back the next day and replace that.“He played a huge role in my throwing career. I sat with him for a few hours after the trials and was able to tell him I was the world record holder. And he watched that throw on the iPad thousands and thousands of times. So I just felt like that was the last note that I wanted to write to him, that I didn’t get the chance to. I know he was here with me in spirit, and I know he would be proud if he was here.”Crouser donned a cowboy hat afterwards and celebrated with his countryman Kovacs, as they both draped the US flag on their backs. Asked where his throws today would have landed in his grandpa’s yard, Crouser replied: “So the fence was 60 feet, so it would have been into the neighbour’s yard and probably would have hit a building, maybe a house.”Ryan Crouser’s family watch on in Redmond, Oregon. Ph
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Matt Walls won gold in the Olympic men’s omnium to deliver Great Britain’s first title in the velodrome of these Games. The 23-year-old rode smartly throughout the four-discipline event to win with a comfortable final margin of 24 points from Campbell Stewart of New Zealand.Walls, who won the opening scratch race, went into the deciding points race with a narrow advantage of six points but gained a lap on the field early on to take control, and could then mark his rivals for the remainder of the 100-lap event.The omnium has changed format for these Games, with four events now squeezed into one testing afternoon of racing. Walls, the European champion who tested positive for Covid-19 in March, jointly led alongside Jan Willem Van Schip and Benjamin Thomas after the tempo race, but then outlasted the pair in the elimination race to take a narrow advantage into the decider.He wasted little time in taking control as he gained a lap alongside American Gavin Hoover, winning the second sprint in the process. That gave him a cushion of 30 points over the field, and from then on he could mark the likes of the reigning champion, Elia Viviani, Thomas and Stewart to the finish.Sign up for our Tokyo 2020 briefing with all the news, views and previews for the Olympic and Paralympic Games.Walls told the BBC: “I managed to get a good lead coming to the end. It’s been a hard day. I came into that points race with a bit of a lead which was nice, it gave me a bit of breathing room.“Thank you to all my family and friends, I wouldn’t be here without them. Especially my parents when I was younger growing up, they travelled around the country with me and there’s no chance I’d be here without them.”Britain had been made to settle for silver in the women’s team pursuit and men’s team sprint earlier in the week, while another event they had previously dominated – the men’s team pursuit – ended in a disappointing seventh place. But Walls – kept out of that pursuit in order to focus entirely on the omnium – ended Britain’s wait for gold on the fourth day of action in the velodrome.The Oldham-born rider tested positive for Covid-19 in late March, disrupting
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From lemonade to lemon tarts to lemon meringue, there’s no shortage of delicious lemon treats to consume. These days, there’s also no shortage of lemon outfits to wear. In February, Meghan Markle wore a sleeveless lemon-print drop-waist dress from Oscar de la Renta for her appearance with Prince Harry at Spotify’s Stream On conference.Meghan Markle and Prince Harry made a virtual appearance at Spotify’s Stream On conference.Two weeks later, first lady Jill Biden wore a similar dress from the same brand to give a speech in honor of International Women’s Day (a move some suggested may have been a show of solidarity with the Duchess of Sussex).Biden wore her Oscar de la Renta look again in late April for a visit to Georgia alongside her husband, President Joe Biden. Both times, the first lady paired her dress with a matching lemon-print mask. Joe and Jill Biden exit the home of former U.S. President Jimmy Carter on April 29, 2021, in Plains, Georgia.Lemon prints can bring yellow brightness and a certain zest for life to everyday outfits. Whether the fruit is set against a white background or a contrasting dark shade, you can find it on dresses, swimsuits, pants, shoes and more. There are many reasons lemon prints may be particularly appealing right now. On one hand, this
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6.00am EDT 06:00 The players are out with Jerusalem blaring out over Nottingham. Food for thought from Tim: Tim de Lisle (@TimdeLisle) It was the #TrentBridge Test. #England were up against a far better team. They won the toss, batted and made only 180-odd. But they bounced back, bowling their opponents out for 190. This was the 2001 Ashes (@alextudorcoach 5-44). And then they went and blew it by making 162 August 5, 2021 5.56am EDT 05:56 A cheerful missive wings into my inbox from Em Jackson: “Well, you can’t tell until each side’s batted once can you, can you?” 5.50am EDT 05:50 Can you improve on Selv’s bit of advice for England this morning? mike selvey (@selvecricket) First bleedin' obvious of the day: Eng can and need to bowl a whole deal better. Why Anderson only bowled 3 overs yesterday is a mystery August 5, 2021 5.48am EDT 05:48 Do you need a catalyst to your nightmare, a sop for your dreams? Look at this: Andy Zaltzman (@ZaltzCricket) Yesterday's England collapse, in inglorious technicolour. 6 wickets for 22, resulting in the lowest 1st innings score by at team that won the toss and chose to bat in a Trent Bridge Test since 1967. pic.twitter.com/Bm0IYGnrN0 August 5, 2021 5.45am EDT 05:45 On Sky, the stattos have worked out that yesterday the swing movement was double the global average. Someth
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For those of us who drink coffee, it’s hard to imagine facing the day without that morning caffeine jolt. While coffee drinkers generally agree that coffee is delicious and necessary, there are different coffee preparation styles out there — some that take more time than others — and yield different flavors, caffeine content and effects. (Who wants the jitters?)“How coffee makes you feel has everything to do with quality, quantity and preparation,” explained Danielle Ryan Broida, a national educator at beverage company Four Sigmatic and expert in different coffee brewing methods. “On the good side, coffee is the number one source of antioxidants in the American diet, it contains essential nutrients, and has positive effects on memory, mood, retention and focus,” she said.On the downside, it can lead to headaches, dehydration, restlessness and anxiety, Broida said. So, how do you create the perfect cup of coffee ― one that helps you avoid anxiety and dehydration while also tastes the way you want and suits your lifestyle? Often, it comes down to how you prepare it.Here’s everything you need to know about different coffee makers and preparation methods so you can find the best one for you.If you love a leisurely morning and consider yourself a coffee connoisseur: Pour-over coffee makerIf you’re one of those people who likes to kick back with the paper while sipping your perfectly brewed cup of coffee, pour-over coffee might be the best preparation method for you. Essentially, you slowly pour just-boiling water over grounds, allowing the liquid to pass through a filter into your cup. (See full instructions here.)“This is the most popular method to make coffee at home for baristas and coffee experts,” explained Jee Choe, a former barista and founder of the coffee blog Coffee at Three. “It requires some practice to make coffee in a pour-over, but once you perfect it, it makes delicious coffee.”His tip? Use a coffee scale to keep an eye on the coffee-to-water ratio and make sure the pour isn’t too fast.In terms of caffeine content, you’ll see a range depending upon the temperature of the water used, the amount of water poured and the ty
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June 2021 was the hottest June in history. Death Valley, California hit 130 degrees Fahrenheit , just 4 degrees shy of the hottest temperature ever recorded on earth. Hot temperatures like these (thanks to climate change) can affect a host of factors that contribute to your overall health ― including your sleep cycle. In order to get your best night’s rest, sleep experts say your bedroom should be around 67 degrees. So how are we supposed to achieve that in all of this heat ― especially if we don’t have air conditioning or don’t want exceedingly high electric bills?The good news is t
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After you endure the stress and hassle of finding and moving to a new place, there is still a lot left to do ― like letting those in charge of your mail, money and other urgent information know you’ve moved to avoid delays or fees. Here’s a checklist of organizations you should inform ASAP of your change of address after a domestic move.1. The United States Postal Service To avoid lost mail, go to USPS.com/move to change your address online as soon as you know your moving date. The website will ask you how many people are changing addresses and which date the USPS should start forwarding
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... and tips on how to use libphonenumber.Given how ubiquitous phone numbers are and how long they've been around, it's surprising how many false assumptions programmers continue to make about them. An individual has a phone number Some people do not own phones, or do not wish to provide you with their telephone number when asked. Do not require a user to provide a phone number unless it is essential, and whenever possible try to provide a fallback to accommodate these users. You can make a call to any phone number Some devices such as EFTPOS terminals, fax machines and mobile internet dongles may not support receiving calls. In addition, some people can not use their phones for phone calls. This may be permanent (such as a hearing disability), temporary (temporary hearing loss) or situational (when the user is in a noisy environment). Tip: Make how you use phone numbers apparent to the user and give them the option to set their preference. Ensure that you look up this preference before attempting to communicate with the user. An individual has only one phone number Obviously, this isn't necessarily true. A phone number uniquely identifies an individual It wasn't even that long ago that mobile phones didn't exist, and it was common for an entire household to share one fixed-line telephone number. In some parts of the world, this is still true, and relatives (or even friends) share a single phone number. Many phone services (especially for businesses) allow multiple inbound calls to or outbound calls from the same phone number. Phone numbers cannot be re-used Old phone numbers are recycled and get reassigned to other people. Phone numbers that are valid today will always be valid. Phone numbers of a certain type today (e.g., mobile) will never be reassigned to another type. A phone number which connects today may be disconnected tomorrow. A number which is free to call today may cost money to call tomorrow. The phone company may decide to expand the range of available phone numbers by inserting a digit into an existing number. Tip: Don’t store properties for a phone number such as validity or type. Check this information again from the library when you need it. Each country calling code corresponds to exactly one country The USA, Canada, and several Caribbean islands share the country calling code +1. Russia and Kazakhstan share +7. These are n
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The toxic politics bedevilling Jair Bolsonaro’s Brazil swept into Father Lino Allegri’s sacristy one Sunday in July, just after the octogenarian priest delivered a homily lamenting the president’s role in the Covid catastrophe that has killed more than half a million Brazilians. As Allegri removed his white cassock, eight enraged congregants stormed into the rectangular backroom, past a portrait of Mother Teresa bearing the words: “The most dangerous person: the lie. The worst feeling: hate.”“Go back to Italy! We don’t want you here!” witnesses remember one of the Bolsonaro-supporting intruders ranting at the Verona-born priest, a naturalised Brazilian citizen who has lived in the South American country for more than 50 years.“Our president is a Christian! A good man! An honest man!” fumed another, jabbing a finger into the 82-year-old clergyman’s face.Allegri said he had never suffered such an aggressive post-service diatribe.“We felt bewildered,” he recalled on a recent Sunday as he sat in the same vestry where he had been harangued by the pro-Bolsonaro mob. Three armed police officers loitered on the street outside to deter another breach.Another church member shook their head sorrowfully as they remembered watching the Bolsonarista churchgoers berate the elderly priest. “It’s fanaticism, there’s no other word for it … an incomprehensible fanaticism,” said the witness, who asked not to be named out of fear for their own security.“Father Lino is so loved by all of us here. He brings us peace,” they added. “I just felt so utterly sad at the point our country has reached.”The sacristy invasion at the ironically named Parish of P
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Asus is making a range of its motherboards ready for Windows 11. The motherboard manufacturer has released BIOS updates for a variety of chipsets, including ones that support Intel Kaby Lake processors from 2017. Both Intel and AMD chipsets are supported, and these new BIOS updates will even automatically enable TPM (Trusted Platform Module) on AMD and Intel systems. A TPM is a minimum requirement for Windows 11, and it’s a change that caused some confusion after many realized their PCs didn’t have the option enabled in the BIOS, or it was confusingly named “PTT” or “PSP fTPM” in BIOS settings. Microsoft’s Windows 11 upgrade checker didn’t ease that confusion initially, so it’s encouraging to see big manufacturers like Asus now enabling TPM by default so people don’t have to dig around. While Asus is planning to support a wide range of motherboards for Windows 11, not every BIOS update is available just yet. Neowin has spotted a full list of Asus motherboards that are compatible with Windows 11, so you’ll need to check to see if your system has an update waiting for it. If you purchased a pre-built PC and you’re not sure of the exact motherboard inside, you should be able to find the model number listed when you navigate to Start > Run > msinfo32 in Windows 10. Asus isn’t alone in its motherboard support for Windows 11. Gigabyte, Asrock, Biostar, and MSI have all released lists of supported systems that will work with Windows 11. It’s still no
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The Chia cryptocurrency craze is fuelling record sales growth in Europe among distributors of hard disk drives (HDD), according to calendar Q2 shipment data from venerable number cruncher Context. Stats for the three months show sales to end users, via distributors and resellers, went up by 141 per cent year-on-year to 454,512 – the biggest quarter in the regional channel ever, said Context. Nearline HDDs – the highest capacity drives – led the pack. Sales of the 18TB model swelled to 84,726, up 125 per cent from the prior quarter. 16TB drives, the second most favoured spec, grew to 51,515 units. Other HDD categories also continue to be highly prized thanks to Chia. "The tremendous Chia-driven demand for storage capacity has turned the European market on its head, with buyers rushing to snap up HDDs," said Gurvan Meyer, business enterprise analyst at Context. "Although it's having a knock-on effect for SSDs and NAS segments, it's headline HDDs that are really driving this spike. As long as there's money to be made in mining Chia coins, we can't see these trends changing much." BitTorrent protocol author Bram Cohen founded the Chia network in 2017, and the currency launched in May 2021. It is considered to be greener than Bitcoin in that it uses relatively less power. US SEC chair calls for crypto regulation NFT or not to NFT: Steve Jobs' first job application auction shows physically unique beats cryptographically unique Private cryptocurrencies make lousy national currencies: International Monetary Fund Reserve Bank of India official suggests country may soon have a digital currency pilot As Reg readers know, Chia differs from traditional crypto-coins in that it relies on proof of space rather than proof of work, as detailed by our sister publication Blocks & Files. "So, rather than using computing power in a race, it's using a lottery system. This is not only greener (in terms of passive power consumption) than proof of work but also more accessible. The barrier to entry is lower as almost anyone in the world might have unused storage space on their computer – perhaps even their phone – that could be used," Context's Meyer said. Storage vendors such as Seagate and Western Digital have been caught out by this trend, Context told us in April. In its Q4 earnings call in June, Seagate CEO Dave Mosley said the market for storage-centric blockchain, including those used for decentralised storage applications with Chia cryptocurrency had "garnered significant interest." "We saw meaningful increase in HDD demand due in part to the initial buildout of the Chia net space which is comprised of both new and repurposed HDDs... This incremental demand served to tighten HDD supply dynamics and [provide] an increase in the robust demand environment." Economies opening up and continued demand from cloud providers expanding their infrastructure played a role in in HDD demand too. "While the future growth outlook in this space remains unclear, we are excited by the potential applications associated with innovations and decentralised file storage," said Mosley. Desktop network attached storage
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“Self-care is important,” the psychiatrist and wife of Aby Rosen told me. “But it can also be a slippery slope to narcissism, an excuse to push away friends.”Credit...Karsten Moran for The New York TimesAug. 5, 2021, 5:00 a.m. ETI was feeling unsettled when I visited Samantha Boardman at her office early last month. We were there to do an interview, but I’d been secretly nursing a hope that Dr. Boardman, a psychiatrist with an Upper East Side practice, would help me resolve some nagging issues. Like many friends and colleagues, I was lethargic, less efficient than I would like to be. Was my listlessness part of a common malaise?“Some of us look back on lockdown as a time of squandered opportunities,” she said. “It’s, ‘I could have completed my screenplay, learned Mandarin or taken up bird watching.’ All these things that I call productivity porn, they can go hand in hand with self obsession.”I was taken aback. I’d lately been given to a bit of navel-gazing, soothing myself with an endless succession of herbal cleanses and long baths and limiting phone time in favor of desultory strolls. Privately I wondered, Was there a point?We were chatting in the office on Madison Avenue where she conducts treatment. “Self-care is important,” Dr. Boardman told me. “But it can also be a slippery slope to narcissism, an excuse to push away friends,.” Practicing its tenets is a reflexive response to “that wellness industrial complex that promises, ‘if we download this, buy that, or go to the country on a silent retreat, we can eat, pray, love our way to happiness.’”Not quite the responses I’d been expecting. But then Dr. Boardman defies rote expectations.There is the professional clout. A cum laude graduate of Harvard, she went on to earn a medical degree from Cornell University and a master’s degree in positive psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.Then there is the pedigree. Dr. Boardman’s father is the Wall Street potentate D. Dixon Boardman, her mother Pauline Pitt, a socially prominent decorator and philanthropist in Palm Beach. Her sister Serena is a high-powered real estate adviser at Sotheby’s International,And at 49, Dr. Boardman is mistress of the art-filled homes in Manhattan, Southampton and St. Bart’s that she shares with her husband Aby Rosen, the real estate developer and art collector who seems to live by the credo, “too much is never enough.”Her intermittent presence at fashion shows, openings and galas in the company of society fixtures including Jamee Gregory, Marjorie Gubelmann and her longtime friend, the designer Tory Burch, has earned her the sobriquet Park Avenue Princess. It’s a label she shucks like an itchy old sweater.ImageCredit...Bill Cunningham/The New York Times“I vaguely remember a photograph of a lot of us sitting at a fashion show,” she said. “I thought it was funny.” She was completing her medical residency at the time, “working all night, doing rotations,” she recalled. “I had already gone through anatomy and biochemistry by then. I was delivering babies.”Hardly the schedule of a social gadabout. “Sam enjoys the lighter aspects of her life
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Part of HuffPost Entertainment. ©2021 BuzzFeed, Inc. All rights reserved. Has Liam Hemsworth Switched From The ‘Hunger Games’ To The Tokyo Games? Timothée Chalamet, Lady Gaga — and now Liam Hemsworth? The Australian “Hunger Games” actor is the latest celebrity that people are convinced has a doppelgänger competing in the Tokyo Olympics. Here’s Hemsworth: And here’s tennis player Karen Khachanov, who won silver in the men’s singles for the Russian Olympic Committee: Compare them side-by-side: Lookalike or a long-lost Hemsworth brother? Since when is @LiamHemsworth a professional te
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A South American-themed restaurant called Escobar has been accused by an MP of “glamourising drug lords and terrorism” by featuring a mural of the drug trafficker Pablo Escobar.Nadia Whittome, the Labour MP for Nottingham East, said she had been contacted by residents who were distressed about the newly opened bar, including one constituent whose relatives were allegedly killed by the late narcoterrorist.The bar in Nottingham city centre features numerous references to Escobar, including an apparent mural and an image of his name over the Colombian coat of arms, and food options such as “Pablo’s platter for two”.The bar’s owners have claimed it is South American-themed and disput
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But will remain writer on troubled Open Roads. Steve Gaynor, co-founder of Gone Home and Tacoma developer Fullbright, has stepped down as the studio's creative lead and manager. Fullbright officially announced the change last night, ahead of a Polygon report which detailed an exodus of staff at the company "at least in part due to Gaynor's behaviour toward workers". Gaynor will remain a writer on Open Roads, the upcoming Annapurna-published story of a mother and daughter, which will now no longer be released in 2021. pic.twitter.com/OX11QJo6Qe— Open Roads (@OpenRoadsGame) August 5, 2021 In
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The impact of bottled water on natural resources is 3,500 times higher than for tap water, scientists have found.The research is the first of its kind and examined the impact of bottled water in Barcelona, where it is becoming increasingly popular despite improvements to the quality of tap water in recent years.Research led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) found that if the city’s population were all to drink bottled water, this would result in a 3,500 times higher cost of resource extraction than if they all drank tap water, at $83.9m (£60.3m)a year.Researchers also found the impact of bottled water on ecosystems is 1,400 times higher than tap water.The authors con
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Like most of the super-rich, Elon Musk has one eye on his legacy, keen to shape how his huge fortune is perceived now and in the future. This perhaps explains why he recently shared the fact that Walter Isaacson, biographer of Steve Jobs, is writing a book about him. “If you’re curious about Tesla, SpaceX & my general goings on, @WalterIsaacson is writing a biography,” tweeted Musk. He added in subsequent tweets that Isaacson has shadowed Musk “for several days so far,” and that he “particularly liked” Isaacson’s biography of US founding father Benjamin Franklin. He also repeated that he will “maybe one day” write his own autobiography. There have been a number book
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President Joe Biden will announce four new judicial nominees on Thursday and he’s including a historic LGBTQ pick in the mix. Biden plans to tap Beth Robinson for a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Robinson, who has been an associate judge on the Vermont Supreme Court since 2011, would be the first openly LGBTQ woman to ever serve on any U.S. appeals court if confirmed. Biden is also nominating John Howard to the powerful D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. Howard is currently an administrative law judge with the D.C. Office of Administrative Hearings. Biden will announce two district court nominees as well: Mary Katherine Dimke, for a seat on the U.S. District Court f
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