Apple’s long-rumored driverless car project, also known as Project Titan, has been shuttered. But the company didn’t announce its cancellation. In fact, Apple barely ever mentioned the secretive project despite laboring on it for nearly a decade. Project Titan was obvious from the outside — from automotive industry hiring to heavily documented, public testing of self-driving cars, there was no way it could stay a secret. But the company still tried to preserve the mystery — when CEO Tim Cook was asked about the project on an investor call in 2016, he responded with cryptic talk about how exciting Christmas Eve is, adding that “it’s going to be Christmas Eve for a while.”Now we know Cook’s Christmas never came. This week, Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman broke the news that Apple will not be making a car, dashing the hopes of any Apple fan who dreamed of cruising around in a Jony Ive-designed roadster. But Apple’s car considerations go back a bit farther than 2014, the year early reports pegged the company’s first real moves to spin up Project Titan. A little over eight years ago, Nest founder Tony Fadell revealed that, while he was still at Apple, he and Steve Jobs had tossed around the idea for an Apple Car in 2008.They agreed that, as cool as they thought that would be, Apple was just too busy. The company had only just released the iPhone — the iPad, Apple’s services business explosion, and Siri were still ahead of it.But six years after Fadell and Jobs’ idle conversations, things were different. The company itself was the most valuable in the world, and its products were selling like hotcakes. Apple was full of momentum and growing fatter with cash every day, but there was no guarantee that its devices would keep the company expanding with their upward sales trajectory. Looking down the line, Apple already had its hands, quite successfully, in so many pies — computers, phones, audio players, for instance, and it was preparing to launch its smartwatch and line of Bluetooth headphones. If it was going to light the world on fire again, it needed to go big with something — why, then, shouldn’t it make a car?So began a nearly 10-year sl
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/ For part two of our Vergecast smart kitchen series, we let the kitchen do the cooking. Chaos ensues.By David Pierce, editor-at-large and Vergecast co-host with over a decade of experience covering consumer tech. Previously, at Protocol, The Wall Street Journal, and Wired. Mar 3, 2024, 3:00 PM UTCIf you buy something from a Verge link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics statement.Image: Samar Haddad for The VergeThe smart fridge is the dream. You’re telling me there’s a gadget in my kitchen that can know all about the food I have in my house, what goes well together, and what I need to cook before it starts to stink up the whole house? A truly smart fridge could help you meal plan, keep your grocery bills down, reduce your food waste, and just make life better. But there are dreams and there’s reality. And on this episode of The Vergecast, for the second in our two-part series on the smart kitchen, we’re putting the dream to the test. The Verge’s Jennifer Patt
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Hi, friends! Welcome to Installer No. 28, your guide to the best and Verge-iest stuff in the world. (If you’re new here, welcome to the Installerverse, so glad you found us, and also, you can read all the old editions at the Installer homepage.) This week, I’ve been reading about that wacky AI Willy Wonka event and what happened to the Apple Car, dying laughing at “Indiana Jones and the $3,500 Headset,” testing Twodos as a new tasks app for iOS, giving both Notion and Notion Calendar another shot, and trying to figure out how to import the adorable Microlino Lite into my driveway.I also have for you the new Dune movie, a new smartwatch, a buzzy new tech book, and oh so many food-related YouTube channels. It’s food week here at Installer, so let’s get into it.(As always, the best part of Installer is your ideas and tips. What are you reading, watching, playing, testing, knitting, or conjuring this week? Tell me everything: [email protected]. And if you know someone else who might enjoy Installer, or you want to get it in your inbox a day early, subscribe here.)Installer / A weekly newsletter by David Pierce designed to tell you everything you need to download, watch, read, listen to, and explore that fits in The Verge’s universe.The DropDune: Part Two. The vibes around this movie are so good that I finally got around to watching Part One (which is awesome, despite the fact that hardly anything ever happens?). The buzz is that it’s bigger and better, and obviously I have to see it in theaters to get one of those horrifying popcorn buckets.Final Fantasy VII Rebirth. This game will make you feel feelings. Stressful, intense, breath-holding feelings. But in a good way. It’s a huge open game with a ton to do, and while it doesn’t exactly reinvent the wheel, everyone seems to be finding something to love in here.Sennheiser’s Momentum True Wireless 4. Sennheiser should be a bigger name in headphones; it just consistently churns out great-sounding stuff. These new $300 buds are definitely high-end, but their audio quality can hang, and they have a bunch of features — like Auracast! — that make them pretty compelling.The Tourist season 2. The first season of this show was a huge hit internationally but kind of under the radar in the US — though it’s having a moment now that it’s on Netflix. I loved it: it’s intense and surprising and beautifully made. If you haven’t watched yet, now’s the time to watch both seasons.“This Hardware Company May Be the Next Apple!” I always like to describe Teenage Engineering as your favorite tech company’s favorite tech company. I don’t think they’re the next Apple, and this video from Varun Mayya does a good job of explaining why — Teenage Engineering is very much playing its own game. And winning.The OnePlus Watch 2. OnePlus’ first smartwatch was… bad. But this one seems to be good! Early reviews say it has solid battery life and pretty good performance, more health and fitness stuff, and a much-improved design. It’s not cheap, but it looks like OnePlus is figuring this smartwatch stuff out.The Recipe with Kenji and Deb. A new food thing! Perfect timing for this week. And I love the show so far: it’s about food, but it’s also about how two very smart people create recipes, which means it’s about how they think about food and how they work. It’s a pure process deep dive, and it’s great.Google Docs markups. If you have an Android device, you can now highlight, draw, or otherwise mark up Google Docs right within the app. This is so much better than leaving a million comments or doing that weird thing where you change the font color and write your notes that way. I need an Android tablet.Burn Book. The discourse around Kara Swisher’s book has been so funny — some people love it, some people hate it, and everybody’s talking about it, which is just precisely the way I suspect Kara wants it. Few people have seen as much of tech as she has; whatever this book is, I’m sure I’m gonna like it.Superhuman Instant Reply. I’m on the record that I think the very best thing AI chatbots do is write emails. Superhuman took it one step further by marrying AI to Gmail-like smart replies, so now you can tap, like, “Sounds good,” and it’ll write out a whole email for you. Superhuman remains the most power user of power user email tools, and it’s still ludicrously expensive, but it’s pressing at AI email in some really fun ways.Screen shareSince it’s food week here at Installer, I asked a true expert to share their homescreen with us today: Stephanie Wu, the editor-in-chief of our sister publication Eater. Eater, among so many other things, is single-handedly responsible for helping me find all the good pizza in my new city and is the reason I’ve been thinking about ube donuts for like the last three years. Stephanie writes a terrific newsletter about Eater and food and news, and you should definitely subscribe.Stephanie warned me in advance that her homescreen wasn’t just full of food apps. Which I realize now makes perfect sense: she’s also a mom, and a boss, and just a human, and one of the fun things about seeing people’s screens has been realizing that no matter what you do all day, we all do so many of the same things. But still… Stephanie, we need some food stuff. And she delivered.Here’s Stephanie’s homescreen, plus some info on the apps she uses and why:The phone: I have the Google Pixel 8 Pro and am a Pixel devotee.The wallpaper: My homescreen is a photo of my two kids, who are almost three and almost one.The apps: Google Messages, WhatsApp, WeChat, Baby Tracker, Nanit, Duolingo, Chrome, Gmail, Phone, Google Maps, Camera.The most useful thing on my homescreen is my calendar widget, which is how I stay on top of everything. It’s color coded for meetings, focus blocks, exercise, and personal events.WhatsApp is my go-to messaging app, and I’ve forced all my friends to move over our group chats, which has much improved my life as an Android user. Then I have my new-parent essentials: an app that keeps track of feeds and diaper changes and the baby monitor.I started my NYT crossword puzzle and Duolingo streaks while I was on parental leave and haven’t been able to give those up. I also love Connections, as frustrating as it can be sometimes.Off-screen, the food-related app I’ve been using the most is the NYC Smart Compost app. Having an orange bin around the corner is a game-changer.I also asked Stephanie to share a few things she’s into right now. Here’s what she said:Like everyone else I know, I’m obsessed with The Traitors. We watch it as soon as it airs because I can’t stand being spoiled. And I love Tournament of Champions, Guy Fieri’s game show-esque cooking competition with a stacked roster of big-name chefs.I’m not a big cook, but I always have a jar of chile crisp in my fridge. Some of my recent favorites are Mama Teav’s Hot Garlic, Yun Hai’s Su Chili Crisp Mala, and Fly by Jing’s Sichuan Chili Crisp.My current go-to kitchen tool is a mini spatula, also known as a jam spoon. It’s great for feeding the baby and scraping clean containers of yogurt or peanut butter.CrowdsourcedHere’s what the Installer community is into this week. I want to know what you’re into right now as well! Email [email protected] or message +1 203-570-8663 with your recommendations for anything and everything, and we’ll feature some of our favorites here every week. Last week, I asked you all to share your favorite food stuff on the internet. Your favorite apps, blogs, creators, recipes, and everything else from the best of the Food Web. And like you always do, you delivered!I’ll get to a bunch of specific stuff, but first, let me try to consolidate the Greatest Hits from all of your responses. Here are the things that came up a bunch of times:Paprika. This was not just the most recommended app but the most recommended thing by far in my inbox: a cross-platform app for meal planning, recipes, and grocery shopping. There are a lot of apps that do this, but Paprika is your overwhelming favorite.Mela. The runner
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Apple has plenty of releases planned for the spring, by the rumor mill’s reckoning, but one thing it may not do is make a big production out of it, according to Mark Gurman in today’s Power On newsletter for Bloomberg. It’s not all that unusual for Apple to skip a spring event — it didn’t have one last year, and it’s skipped it in years past, too. Even so, it’s a little surprising, given the plethora of devices the company is expected to launch.The biggest thing is a revamped iPad Pro with an OLED screen and an M3 chip. For the most part, Apple’s highest-end tablet’s design has been unchanged since its 2018 refresh, when it took on the flat-sided design language that also defines the company’s phones, laptops, and even the iMac. The company is also expected to update the iPad Air, introducing a new 12.9-inch version alongside the usual 10.9-inch model. Both would be the first new iPads since 2022.Rumors have been predicting a new Apple Pencil, too, though there hasn’t been a lot of information about what will be different. There could be new interchangeable magnetic tips that alter its characteristics for different kinds of art, and it may also have Find My built-in. Other accessories that have been tipped by Gurman and others include a redesigned Magic Keyboard for the iPad Pro that would be encased in aluminum and lend the deluxe iPad more of the illusion of a laptop.Rumors have pegged spring as the release window for M3 chip-equipped 13- and- 15-inch MacBook Airs, as well. Those probably won’t change hugely — just more powerful chips. But apart from perhaps a nicer display, I’m not convinced anyone is clamoring for big changes on the Air lineup. As with iPads, this would be the first update to the excellent 13-inch MacBook Air since 2022.That’s so much new hardware to announce without a big production! But maybe it makes sense. After all, it’s not without precedent, and it’s not like there are any fancy new chips for Johnny Srouji to talk up in his lab. Plus, if Apple changes little else about the iPad Pro apart from the screen, there’s functionally not a lot to really get excited about there, either. It also remains to be
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Google Drive for iOS now lets you filter searches using dropdown menus for File Type, Owners, and Last Modified, the company wrote on Friday in its Workspace Updates blog. The dropdown menus show up before and after a search, and relevant filter recommendations will show up as well as users type.Google says the update is available to Google Workspace customers and individual subscribers, as well as anyone with a personal Google account on iOS. The feature hasn’t been rolled out for Android users yet, but Google says that’s coming, too. Here’s a screen recording I made to show how it work
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HP has a new proposition in a time when (companies like it have made sure) you don’t really control much about your computer anyway: why don’t you just let HP rent you one? The company debuted a subscription service today — just like CEO Enrique Lores said it would last month — called the HP All-In Plan. It’s essentially an extension of HP’s Instant Ink, and like that plan, you’ll have ink sent to you as you approach empty, but unlike it, your monthly fee also covers the printer itself. Which printer you get depends on the plan you choose. They start at $6.99 per month for 20 pag
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Waymo is now allowed to operate its self-driving robotaxis on highways in parts of Los Angeles and in the Bay Area following a California regulator’s approval of its expansion (PDF) plans on Friday. This means the company’s cars will now be allowed to drive at up to 65mph on local roads and highways in approved areas. In a statement to The Washington Post, Waymo spokesperson Julia Ilina said the company’s expansion will be “careful and incremental,” and that it has “no immediate plans” to extend service to highways.Last month, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) put the company’s expansion on hold until June “for further staff review,” following protests from several San Francisco city agencies and other groups. Concerns about the safety of driverless robotaxis have grown after several high-profile crashes, such as when a Waymo car crashed into a bicyclist last month and a Cruise vehicle struck and dragged a pedestrian 20 feet in October last year. Now, CPUC has concluded that that Waymo has shown its “attention to continuous evaluation and improvement of its technology, safety practices, and aspects of its operations involving humans ... that minimize risk of driverless passenger service operations” in expanded areas. The decision gave Waymo permission to start its expansion immediately.CPUC wrote in its decision that it had denied a request from the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) for evidentiary hearings on “disputed facts,” because it hadn’t “identified material disputed facts that would be resolved through formal hearings.” The LADOT also asked that CPUC wait until a California law, Senate Bill 915 — which would give cities more regulatory sway over robotaxis — is settled, but CPUC called that and other arguments “outside the scope of staff’s delegated authority.” Several groups writing to CPUC in support of the expansion “generally highlighted the potential safety, accessibility, economic, and environmental benefits” of Waymo’s service, according to the commission. Some still had concerns, like the American Council of the Blind, which said CPUC shouldn’t approve Waymo’s request without “beginning the process” of instituting new safety and accessibility standards. The commission refused, calling this and other regulatory issues “matters of broader AV policy.”
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Apple rarely discounts its own products, which is why I was pleasantly surprised to find Apple welcoming the weekend with some terrific deals on Beats headphones and earbuds. Both the Beats Studio Pro and Beats Studio Buds Plus are down to some of their best prices to date, with numerous third-party retailers matching Apple’s pricing. That means you can pick up the Beats Studio Pro for $199.95 ($150 off) directly from Apple, or at Amazon and Best Buy for around the same price. The Beats Studio Buds Plus, meanwhile, can be had starting at $129.95 ($40 off) from Apple, Amazon, and Best Buy.Compared to Apple’s AirPods lineup, the Studio Pro and Studio Buds Plus offer more flexibility, with native support for both iOS and Android software features. The Studio Pro are also Apple’s first over-ear headphones to support lossless audio over USB-C, while the Studio Buds Plus arrive in multiple colors — including a see-through option that’s more eye-catching than any AirPods model to date. Both fall short of the AirPods Max and second-gen AirPods Pro when it comes to noise cancellation and transparency modes, however, and you do lose out on some iOS tricks, including audio sharing. Still, both deliver better sound, ANC, and battery life than the prior models, making them a worthwhile upgrade overall.The new Beats Studio Pro feature improved noise cancellation, sound quality, and comfort. They also support lossless audio over USB-C, making them the first Apple headphones to do so.The Beats Studio Buds Plus offer better sound and noise cancellation than the original pair, and they now come in a unique translucent color option.If you’re planning on traveling over spring break, buying a Bluetooth tracker to keep tabs on your luggage can provide some extra peace of mind. And right now, one of our favorite models — Eufy’s SmartTrack Card — is down to an all-time low of $16.99 ($13 off) at Amazon and B&H Photo.Eufy’s location trackers are good options for iOS users looking for a cheaper AirTag-alternative. That’s because they’re also compatible with Apple’s extensive Find My network, which allows for impressively precise tracking along with support for unwanted tracking alerts. The biggest difference between Eufy’s trackers and Apple’s is that they’re credit card-shaped, so you can easily slip them into your wallet or passport holder. Sadly, they don’t sport user-replaceable batteries, but they do come with a small and handy clip attachment, so you can attach them to your laptop and other valuables.The Eufy Security SmartTrack Card works with Apple’s Find My network, comes with a clip, lets you know when you’ve left it behind, and can ring your phone even if it’s in silent mode.Other ways to save this weekendNow through March 31st, the first-gen Sonos Move is available for around $279 ($120 off) from Sonos and Costco (if you’re a member). The large speaker may not offer stereo sound or in-line playback like the newer Sonos Move 2, but it’s still loud enough to fill most rooms. It also supports Google Assistant, unlike the Move 2, which was forced to drop the feature due to an ongoing legal dispute with Google. As a
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Every time you install an app on your iPhone, it comes with permissions attached — permissions that determine what it can and can’t do. These permissions cover some pretty fundamental parts of iOS, including access to the iPhone camera, microphone, and current location. The permissions get asked for one by one as they’re needed, so you’ve got plenty of control over how your apps are behaving. But sometimes, especially when you’re in a hurry, it’s easy to accidentally give permission for an app to access data it doesn’t really require. Does your note-taking app really need to see your contact list, for example? As a result, it’s well worth your while to do a regular audit of these permissions just in case you’ve previously allowed a permission you now want to revoke or vice versa. It’s not difficult to change your settings, and it gives you an extra layer of privacy and security. Here’s how.Before installingYou can assess the permission that apps ask for before you install them. Apps need to reveal the data they’ll collect — and how it’s used. You can check out the data an app is going to collect before you install it — it’s right on the app’s page in the App Store. Reading through this list before you do any downloading or installing can give you a good idea of how much access to your iPhone and data an app wants.On the app’s App Store page, scroll down to App Privacy and tap See Details for a full rundown. You may not see every permission that the app is going to ask for here, but a lot of the data categories that are listed correspond to certain permissions on your phone — your phone’s location and its contact list, for example.As well as listing the types of data that get collected, the list will also offer a general reason for the collection. It might be to improve app functionality, for example, or to target marketing messages or personalize the product. If you’re not happy with the app’s practices and policies, leave it uninstalled.If you do install an app, you’ll find it requesting permissions as and when it needs them. Most of these permissions should be pretty essential to the function of the app — it’s hard to get an Uber if the app doesn’t know where you are, for example — but use your discretion with permissions that don’t seem necessary. Ideally, an app should explain why it needs each permission, though not all of them will.Configuring permissionsTo manage the permissions on your iPhone, head to Settings. If you want to see which permissions a specific app has been permitted:Scroll down to the app you want to look more closely at and tap on its name.You’ll see a list of permissions the app has and hasn’t been granted.Tap on any permission to change its setting.If you want to check out a specific permission and see all of the apps that are using it:Choose Privacy & Security from Settings. You’ll see a list of permissions (like Contacts and Photos). Tap on the one you’re interested in to see which apps have been given permission and which have not.It’s up to you which way you approach it, but you’ll find the same permission settings in either case.Partial p
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When Halo season 2 finally covered the fall of the planet Reach — a foundational, emotional moment in Halo lore — I figured that I’d write a few words of praise about it. But then I saw the episode after, “Aleria,” and that episode, not “Reach,” is the one that truly delivers a Halo experience worthy of the games yet so wonderfully unlike them.Spoilers for Halo season 2 to followOne of the elements missing from Halo season 1 was the camaraderie between Spartans.  The first half of Halo’s second season better developed and defined the relationships of Silver Team (Master Chief Petty Officer John-117, Riz-028, Kai-125, and Vannak-134); specifically, Riz-028 (Natasha Culzac) an
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When it comes to finding a device to use to read your ebooks, you have a few options to choose from. You can always buy a tablet or use your phone, but those devices are multipurpose and can be used f
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Bad news for Roblox fans on Linux — the workarounds are dead. GamingOnLinux reports that the latest version of Roblox “forcefully blocks it from working with Wine,” throwing a “Wine is not supported” error message even when Roblox-specific tools like Vinegar and Grapejuice are added. Wine is the compatibility layer that lets many Windows games run on Linux systems.But Roblox claims it’s not personal. “Confirming there has been no change on our end to specifically block Linux or Steam Deck since Roblox never supported Linux or Steam Deck officially,” spokesperson Samantha Spielman tells The Verge. “We’re constantly improving our Hyperion anti-cheat functionality, so it’s
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Threads plans to release its API by the end of June after testing it with a limited set of partners, including Hootsuite, Sprinklr, Sprout Social, Social News Desk, and Techmeme. The API will let deve
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