Winter is the best time to gather friends and explore the splendor of the great indoors. The season’s cold weather also provides a convenient excuse to attempt any comforting dish or drink you can think of. Can you see your breath because it’s so cold? Probably best to warm up with a rib roast and a bottle of red. Is there a foot of snow outside? Might as well batch margaritas, whip up homemade salsa verde, and pretend that ever-growing snowbank is a sand dune. Here are 50 of our favorite recipes for winter hosting, when temperatures are chilly and living rooms are extra cozy. From Our Shop 1. Mid-Winter Margarita Winter is for citrus and citrus is happiest when keeping tequila company. Start your gathering with this simple winter margarita and serve something crunchy and salty to snack on. 2. Winter Citrus Rum Punch If a margarita doesn’t satisfy your winter citrus craving, a punch that includes grapefruit, orange, lemon, and lime juice should do the trick. Bonus: This recipe serves a crowd. 3. Horseradish Vodka Bloody Mary If you’re getting together with friends for a long weekend, batch this bloody mary mix beforehand and your puffy eyed, Sunday morning self will be better for it. 4. Bourbon, Orange, & Ginger Come for the bourbon, stay for the ginger-infused simple syrup. (You’ll want it around for adding to future sips, too.) 5. Dirty Chai Toddy A dirty chai with a shot of bourbon? Absolutely. 6. Cardamom Hot Chocolate Cardamom and a teaspoon of butter give this hot chocolate a rich, warming flavor that’ll restore you and your friends
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It’s no secret that Argentine chimichurri is one of the greatest sauces of all time. Fresh oregano, parsley, and cilantro join forces with an unshy amount of red wine vinegar to become an excellent condiment or punchy marinade, transforming simply seasoned proteins and vegetables into standout meals. If it’s a sauce you turn to regularly, then you likely have everything you need to try a new version: creamy chimichurriDeveloped by food editor Shilpa Uskokovic for our February 2023 issue, this recipe combines the sharp, herbaceous energy of the original sauce with the soothing tang of yogurt. Whole-milk Greek yogurt is key here. According to Uskokovic, it “plays an extra role in tenderizing the meat, while doing so more gently and effectively than the straight-up acid of the original.” Bracing vinegar-based marinades can toughen proteins like chicken if left on for too long. Yogurt-based marinades, however, slowly tenderize, resulting in juicy meat. That’s what makes Sh
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I don’t always want to cook—cue shock, horror, and “but you work in food media, that’s your thing"—but I don’t. Just like, I’m sure, you don’t either. When this mood strikes, sometimes egg tacos or avocado toast will suffice. Other times, you don’t want to cook but you do want a real, home-cooked dinner. I'm here to tell you that, in fact, you can have it both ways. You just need a little help from your freezer. These 10 meals can be made-ahead, frozen, thawed, and reheated for when you just can’t in the kitchen. Below, I’ve also suggested fresh plus ones to make along side your frozen food. However, you can totally just make the main dish and leave the sides aside (ha!). And, if you’re new to freezer-friendly foods or just skeptical about what should and shouldn’t be frozen, check out this guide. From Our Shop 1. Soup & Biscuits Need help with defrosting your soup (or help finding the best soup recipe)? We've got you covered in this step-by-step guide. For how to freeze and cook biscuits, see here. To really make a meal of it, add a fresh dollop of yogurt for on top of the soup. 2. Dumplings & XO Sauce If you need help freezing your dumplings, we've got a guide for that. For how to cook said frozen dumplings see here. For freezing the XO Sauce, let it cool and portion it into ice cube trays, so you don’t end up with a big ol’ frozen block of un-portionable, un-scoopable sauce. After the cubes are frozen, transfer to a freezer bag. When you’re ready to cook, you can thaw the sauce in the fridge or just throw it right into some stir-fried vegetables to thaw and cook. 3. Meatballs & Sauce Cook the sauce as the recipe states and let cool completely before portioning into freezer bags and placing in the freezer. To thaw, place the bags of sauce on a plate or bowl (no spillage!) and leave in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 hours. The sauce probably won’t be completely cooled by then, but that’s okay! Just put it into a pot, turn the heat on, and that’ll do the trick. For the meatballs, cook as the recipe states. Let cool, then place, separated, on a parchment-covered sheet pan and into the freezer to freeze. Once frozen, put them in a freezer bag. To reheat the meatballs, place into your pot of thawed tomato sauce and simmer until warmed through. Looking to level-up your frozen meal? It’s meatball sub time. Grab a baguette (or, if you’re feeling ambitious make one and freeze that, too), fresh mozzarella, and pepperoncini—and the meatballs and tomato sauce, of course!—and get to layering your subs. 4. Enchilada Casserole & Black Beans Assemble the casserole and cover very well with aluminum foil and secure the foil’s edges with tape. To cook, you have two options: Thaw in the fridge overnight and bake as described in the recipe or place directly into the oven, without thawing, knowing you’ll need about 15 minutes or more of extra cooking time (if you see yourself doing the former, use an aluminum pan to avoid any glass shattering). To freeze and thaw beans, cook and follow the same instructions for the tomato sauce. For a fresh element, add sliced avocado and chopped cilantro to the casserole when it's time to serve. 5. Chicken Fingers & Sweet Potato Fries After breading the chicken fingers (but before baking), place onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and into the freezer. Freeze until frozen, then place into a freezer bag. When ready to cook, arrange on a baking rack set on a baking sheet, drizzle with oil, and bake at 425°F for about 25 minutes, or until cooked through. For the sweet potato fries, cook the fries as directed and let cool completely. Place on a parchment-lined sheet pan and into the freezer. Once frozen, you can transfer them to a freezer bag. To cook, place onto a parchment-lined sheen pan and pop them into the oven (at 425°F, so the same as the chicken fingers) for about 10 minutes, or until they’re warmed through. Ketchup and/or ranch dressing are a must for dipping the chicken fingers. For a fresh green thing, serve a salad on the side. 6. Samosas & Dal After filling and forming your samosas, place onto a parchment-lined sheet pan and pop into the freezer. Once frozen, transfer to a freezer bag. When ready to bake, place once again on a parchment-lined sheet pan and cook as directed in the recipe, adding on a few more minutes to account for the samosas being frozen. For the dal, cook as the recipe states, let cool, and follow the same freezing and thawing instructions as the tomato sauce. When it's time to eat, make a pot of rice for the dal, and some sort of vegetable (perhaps Steam-Roasted Carrots with Cumin?). 7. Chili & Cornbread Cook the chili as the recipe says to, let cool, and follow the same freezing and thawing instructions as the tomato sauce. For the cornbread, cook as directed and follow the freezing and thawing instructions here. For serving, prep whatever fixin’s you like adding to your chili—diced red onions, sour cream, grated cheese, chopped cilantro, and pickled jalapeños are my faves. Meal 8: Chicken Stock & Leftover Roast Chicken Make the chicken stock, let cool completely, portion into freezer bags, and freeze. Put the chicken stock in a pot and turn the heat on low, stirring occasionally to break up the stock. Heat until thawed and at a simmer. For the chicken, once cool, shred some of that roasted bird and place into freezer bags and freeze. If you had the foresight to thaw your chicken in the fridge the night before, great! If not, add it right to the pot (that’s why you shredded it). Stock + chicken = chicken noodle soup. Grab some noodles, frozen peas, chopped celery, and peeled, thinly sliced carrots (on the bias, if you like). If you’re unsure of how to make chicken noodle soup, here’s a good guide. Right before serving, throw in some minced parsley and a smattering of freshly ground black pepper. 9. Chicken Tamale Pie & Salsa Follow the casserole freezing, thawing, and cooking (following the time and temperature directions in the pie's recipes) instructions as described for the Vegan Enchilada Casserole. For the salsa, cook and let cool. Then, portion it into freezer bags and freeze. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator or, in a pinch, in a bowl of cold water, refreshing the water several times until thawed. A side of guacamole and chips are great fresh additions for when it comes time to serve. And perhaps a green salad, too, dressed with a spicy lime vinaigrette. 10. Mac & Cheese Cook as stated, let cool, and cover with aluminum foil, sealing the edges with tape. Place into the freezer. When ready to cook, thaw overnight in the refrigerator and reheat at 375°F until warmed through.
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Imagine being a stowaway in the dark bellows of a clipper ship, complete with the sounds of creaking wood and portholes with sea views and changing weather patterns. Or hop on an elegant early 20th-century train, sip a high-end cocktail, and enjoy scenery of fog rolling in over Louisiana’s bayou. These aren’t far-off voyages. They’re the settings of bars in Phoenix’s emerging world of cocktail theater—where elevated cocktails accompany immersive, performance art-esque settings.Over the past few years, Phoenix has become home to three unorthodox spaces for these very realistic theatrics. Though bars have long hosted live acts like bands or burlesque, the bars Platform 18 (train themed), UnderTow (ship themed), and 36 Below (botanical wonderland) are a new breed. In these spaces, a bar becomes the stage and bartenders are the directors. Flip to the back of the menu at Platform 18 or UnderTow, and instead of just drink descriptions, you’ll meet the plotline of the night. Maybe it’s the fictional Hollis Cottley Pennington’s bootlegging adventures in the Rockies, or the story of Captain Mallory’s possible journey to find a shipwrecked Undertow. Read carefully and you’ll notice the cocktail names are weaved into the story as destinations or characters.“We are storytellers,” says Mat Snapp, vice president of operations at Platform 18 and UnderTow. “Creating an environment to entertain that is positive, fun, full of wonder, nostalgia, and emotion is our goal.” While elaborate storytelling is key to these bars’ appeal, the drinks play a starring role. Platform 18 and Undertow offer encyclopedia-sized menus featuring complex concoctions—classics and originals, alike. At Platform 18, you’ll find funky historical cocktails like Hot Pants (a bright pink, 70s-era recipe that melds tequila, grapefruit, and mint into an inexplicably delicious drink) and house-made boozy ice creams, like the Grasshopper. UnderTow offers tiki drinks, original and classics, such as the Scorpion Bowl cocktail—rum, cognac, orgeat, orange, lemon and nutmeg— served in a bowl complete with pools of flames on the rim. Grab some friends; you’ll need help. Hid
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Eric See is the chef-owner of Ursula, a New Mexican café in Brooklyn. He’s also one of BA’s Heads of the Table recipients for 2021 and an Albuquerque native. We couldn’t think of anyone better than See to guide us through a food-packed day of eating through this high desert culinary gem.New Mexico is the self-proclaimed Land of Enchantment, but growing up here we called it the Land of Entrapment—we wanted to escape the little-town feel of Albuquerque. Now that I live in Brooklyn, I can never wait to go back. For folks visiting for the first time, or those of us who return, the idea
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As far as steaks go, London broil is not the most glamorous way to prepare a cut of beef. It doesn’t have the star power of a sizzling T-bone, nor does it necessarily have the name recognition of a tenderloin. Still, a London broil has its own charm. For one, it’s more affordable than some of its more well known siblings—I’m looking at you prime rib. But, with a little planning and a sprinkle of ingenuity, London broil can become the luxuriously tender, bracingly savory centerpiece of any dinner. Although the two are often seen as synonymous, London broil is in fact a preparation of m
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This post contains products independently chosen (and loved) by our editors and writers. Food52 earns an affiliate commission on qualifying purchases of the products we link to. Building out an at-home bar can quickly become overwhelming. If you’re not a bartender or someone who knows the ins and outs of cocktails and mixology, the process can go from being a fun task to a chore in minutes. Which liquors should you always have on hand? Are there specific tools that are better than others? What about garnishes—are they really necessary? To answer some of these questions, we spoke with bartenders across the country about their best tips and tricks for an ideal at-home bar setup and some simple mistakes to avoid. The first piece of advice? Steer clear of pre-curated bartending kits. “The quality is almost always lacking,” Marisa Campbell, a bartender in Rogers, Arkansas, says. “It’s better to buy individual pieces you admire and slowly build your collection to your likes and dislikes.” Campbell’s ideal at-home bar cart is perfect for anyone with enough space for a well-rounded and robust setup. It includes both a mesh strainer and a julep strainer, a bar spoon, a Y-shaped peeler for citrus peels, a channel knife for citrus twists, and a Japanese-style precision jigger because they’re more accurate (and elegant) than others. When choosing a shaker, Campbell prefers a Boston-style shaker with a tin-on-tin design (as opposed to glass-on-tin) because it’s easy to use. “The cobbler-style shaker has the plus of a built-in strainer, but even I have difficulty breaking the seal to get them apart sometimes and there are more pieces to clean,” she explains. Brooks Moyer, a bartender in Brooklyn, New York, agrees that a Boston-style shaker is the way to go. “As long as you know how to seal the tins before shaking, there’s minimal mess, plenty of space in the tins for multiple drinks, and one tin can serve as a little mixing glass for stirred cocktails.” Like Campbell, he also prefers the Japanese-style jiggers for measuring—but notes that any measuring device that's as specific at 0.5 ounces will also work—and Y-peelers for any citrus peels. “You have good control and are able to get a nice, wide swatch of citrus when peeling.”
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Welcome to Delicious or Distressing, where we rate recent food memes, videos, and other decidedly unserious news. Last week we discussed M&M’s decision to replace its spokescandies with Maya Rudolph.In scrupulously charting the trajectory of food news for this once-baby, now-young-adult column, we’ve begun to notice some recurring patterns and archetypes, as all empirical scientists do. A drink features on some zeitgeisty show and skyrockets to fervent popularity itself. A buffoonish tech oligarch peels back the curtain on their consumption habits and, in turn, their slightly questionable psyche. Anna Delvey. All three of them, in some iteration, made a reappearance this week. The negroni sbagliato passed the virality baton to Beaujolais-Villages wine, which has The Last of Us to thank for its 15 minutes of fame. With basically all the world’s resources at his disposal, Jeff Bezos opted for homemade Betty Crocker pancakes as his daily breakfast of choice—because he's just like us. Anna Delvey is somehow still profiting from her scammery, debuting a televised dinner party series while on house arrest. Steeped in a different reference, the iPad Kid reached a level of tech savvy that has parents everywhere quaking. A precocious six year old, in spite of his yet-to-be-developed consciousness, called in $1,000 worth of food on Grubhub, and I can’t help but be impressed, albeit scared. You do you, little boy.  Beaujolais Villages wine is trending thanks to The Last of Us I’m not here to talk about why there are zero Dunkin’ Donuts 10 miles west of Boston in HBO’s new hit TV show. I can forgive The Last of Us for that because, frankly, I’m still recovering from Bill and Frank’s tear-jerking love story (and The Last of Up edit did not help!!!) in the latest episode. The third episode, titled “Long, Long Time,” is a best-case scenario survivalist fantasy: Bill and Frank have tools, weapons, gas and electricity, strawberries, and candlelit dinners. Despite his rough exterior, Bill is a man of taste who knows to pair rabbit with a bottle of Louis Jadot Beaujolais-Villages, a cheap French red wine that Jadot’s website calls "fruit-forward" with "expressive aromas and flavors of strawberries and black cherries with spice notes." It appears and returns in a scene guaranteed to emotionally destroy you. One closeup of the label and I knew: The Beaujolais-Villages was about to be—enter my new favorite verb—“Negroni Sbagliato’d.” Honestly, if HBO keeps this up, it’s about to become my new favorite drinks influencer. 5/5 delicious. —Esra Erol, senior social media managerAnna Delvey launches a dinner club reality TV series I’m drafting this blurb fully understanding that Anna Sorokin’s grift has worked once again: She’s landed a deal with the production company Butternut for a reality show called Delvey’s Dinner Club, and now Bon Appétit (its website, at least) is writing about it. Anna, if you’re reading this, please understand that Delicious Or Distressing is a meme column, in which we’ve also featured anthropomorphic M&Ms and a guy using a hot dog as a straw. Anyway, the gist of the sh
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A couple weeks ago, I received some cocktail bombs in the mail. You know, the kind you plunk into your bathtub—I mean, cocktail glass—with seltzer water, then let them fizz out their powdered flavors before perhaps adding a little booze and drinking them. The cocktail itself tasted fine, if a little redolent of Flintstone vitamins. But as I watched the kinetic crystals of orange mojito dissipate, something snapped. How on earth did I get here, I wondered, consuming a product so gimmicky that its drinker could be forgiven for accidentally taking a bath with it? The beverages had gone too far. At seemingly every supermarket and drugstore, I’ve tripped over a dozen hard seltzer displays spilling into the aisles. I kept my cool through the influx of cactus, hop, birch, aloe, probiotic, and adaptogenic waters; through the canned highballs, sake spritzes, and margaritas (a few quite good), flavored lattes, sparkling cold brews, and redundantly conceived “hard” kombuchas. I didn’t even overreact that time I brought home an energy drink I’d mistaken for tangerine-flavored sparkling water—mostly due to humiliation that I somehow missed ENERGIZE shouting in all caps on the box. Listen, I’m American. I love, nay, need consumer choice. Nothing empowers me more than matching my exact mood to the thing I’m imbibing. (Am I feeling warm-spicy, like ginger beer with black pepper? Or fiery and fresh, like jalapeño-watermelon tepache?) I likewise understand that for far too long, people who opted out of addictive stimulants or alcohol faced abysmal alternatives. Plenty of products are thoughtfully made, genuinely delicious, and cleverly named (looking at you, Phony Negroni). The ritual of gathering over them can be universally fun. But we’ve swung so far into beverage saturation territory that I can’t even peruse the coolers at 7-Eleven without wanting to bury my head in the sand like an ostrich because I’m overwhelmed by choice. I suspect we’ve only scratched the surface of “innovation” in the beverage category. The global ready-to-drink (RTD) market reached $89 billion as of 2022, according to research company Transparency Market Research. The firm also estimates that the North American RTD beverage market will hit somewhere between $13.9 and $22.3 billion by the end of this year. Between 2020 and 2021, premade, spirits-based RTD makers increased revenues by 42 percent in the US, no doubt buoyed by recurring periods of at-home happy hours due to the pandemic. If my inbox is any indication, reopening society has done little to stem new product introductions, alcoholic or not. Recent newcomers included watermelon-infused moscato from a celebrity, strawberry-vanilla prebiotic soda, and those cocktail bombs. Who knows what fountain-of-youth or sentient concoctions drink makers will be peddling us next year?Lately, I’ve decided to rebel the only way I know how, by opting exclusively for analog and DIY drink choices—I’m talking tap water, home-brewed coffee, and (gasp!) plain old wine in bottles. Occasionally I’ll make a London fog (tea brewed in steamed milk) for a bit of theater. I may not be alone
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In our Taste Test series, BA editors conduct blind comparisons to discover the best supermarket staples (like vanilla ice cream or frozen pizza). Today, which potato chip will satisfy your crunchiest cravings?What’s not to love about potato chips? They’re cheap, easy to find, and gloriously junk-foody. A potato chip’s delicate, salty crunch is the quintessential snack on its own. But added to a sandwich, for instance, or even boosted by complementary seasonings and dips, it alchemizes, transforming into something greater than the sum of its parts.There are seemingly endless brands and genres of potato chips to choose from. Would you prefer baked or fried? With ruffles or without? D
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The shininess of the new year has worn off. If you’re like us, February is when you turn to tried-and-true, homey, comforting recipes—soups and stews, or quick-breads and baking projects that heat
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Photo by Julia Gartland January 2023 has officially come to a close, which means it’s time to round up your favorite meals (and drinks!) from the past month. From cozy soups and stews galore to bright, citrusy cakes, we reached peak winter cooking in January. In no particular order, here are last month’s 10 most popular new recipes. 1. One-Bowl Lemon Cake With Citrus Glaze
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Coconuts play an important role in Parsi cooking and are symbolic of prosperity and life in Zoroastrian culture and religion. At most food markets in India, there are stalls dedicated to cracking, peeling, and grating coconuts, which makes life easier. If you’re based somewhere without this luxury, it is a useful and rewarding skill to learn how to crack a coconut.Before we can crack our coconut, we must first have a coconut to crack! There are telltale signs for good and bad coconuts and once you have them memorized, you will be able to tell a perfect coconut from a dud in seconds.First, look for lots of fresh fibers on the coconut—the older the coconut, the drier the fibers; look for ones that are lush and almost damp. Second, pick up the coconut and feel the weight—there should be a reassuring heft to the coconut. If it feels light for its size, it is probably old and dried out. Check the surface of the coconut for any cracks that may have let air in and spoiled the flesh. This is no good. Finally, place that coconut up to your ear and give it a good shake—there should be a generous amount of sloshing of coconut water going on inside that shell. The more water, the less time it’s been hanging around drying out.To begin cracking, remove as much of the dried husk from the shell as possible, as this only gets in the way and dampens the blows. Go outside and find a hard piece of concrete, a brick, or a similar surface. Have next to you a bowl to collect the coconut water and a sturdy, pointed knife to pry the shell open.Crouch down and, with a firm grip on your coconut, start giving it sharp blows on the ground around its equator. In this moment, I like to picture myself as one of the apes in the opening sequence of 2001: A Space Odyssey as I strike the blows.After every strike, turn the coconut a few centimeters around and strike a different area along its equator—you are not looking to smash the coconut to smithereens, only to strike with enough force to crack the shell open a little and allow you to slip the knife in. Soon enough the sharp cracking sound will turn to a dull thud. This means the force field has been breached!Find the spot with the
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Photo by Bobbi Lin We asked for our community’s best winter potato recipe, and you all delivered. From creamy and comforting gratins to elegant potato-stuffed pastries (shout out to our runner-up, Bevi's Everything Baked Potato Puff Pastries), choosing just one was not an easy task. After multiple rounds of recipe testing, narrowing down the finalists, and asking our community to vote, we finally have a winner: ‘World Famous' Mahogany Potatoes by Lisanne Weinberg, known on our site as creamtea. To celebrate the occasion, we chatted with the recipe developer about this winning potato dish—and why it has resonated with so many home cooks over the years. The recipe has been on our site for over a decade. Why do you think it's had such staying power and continues to resonate with readers? First of all, let me say that I'm absolutely delighted with the “staying power” of this recipe! I believe the recipe resonates with readers because of the ease-to-deliciousness ratio. You simpl
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Maybe you’re reading this and thinking, but I already have an analog thermometer kicking around in the back of a drawer somewhere! Do I really need to buy another one?! The answer from us is an emphatic YES. There’s a reason that all of our recommendations are for digital instant-read thermometers. While the notion of a battery-free kitchen thermometer may be intriguing in theory, analog thermometers are simply not fast or precise enough to be helpful in most situations. When so much of successful meat cooking comes down to brief moments and degrees, waiting 10 seconds for a ballpark reading—is the needle hovering over 125 or 130?—just isn’t going to cut it.What is the most accurate meat thermometer?As I mentioned earlier, the most accurate and best instant-read thermometer on the market today is, hands down, the ThermoWorks Thermapen One. (It’s worth noting here that the ThermoWorks Thermapen MK4, formerly the best of the best, has been discontinued and replaced with the Thermapen One, which looks and feels almost identical but is even faster.)How do I love this product? Let me count the ways. It is consistently accurate to half of a degree Fahrenheit. It offers a temperature reading in one solitary second, quicker than you can even SAY the word “temperature.” It has an easy-to-read backlit display that rotates 360 degrees, so you can see the numbers clearly from any angle. It has no buttons to speak of, which makes its ease of use unmatched—you simply lever the stainless-steel probe out from the body of the thermometer and the thing turns on, and it turns off automatically after a few seconds when it’s not being used, which saves battery. Speaking of battery life: I’ve had my Thermapen MK4 for more than five years and have never had it die on me, but I love the fact that, if it ever does run out of juice, all I have to do is pop in a regular old AAA, not some weird, obscure kind of battery. Did I mention that it is water-resistant and comes in 10 colors?The only downside to this miraculous piece of kitchen equipment? The price tag. The crème de la crème of cooking thermometers is going to run you a cool $99—which ain’t nothing, but
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The only thing better than a good recipe? When something’s so easy you don’t even need one. Welcome to It’s That Simple, a column where we talk you through the dishes and drinks we can make with our eyes closed.There’s a lot to be said about people who wake up at the crack of dawn to whip up elaborate breakfasts for their loved ones. The whole endeavor screams selflessness and, at some point in our lives, we all aspire to be this person. But let’s face it: Even if you are a morning person with a nurturing side, chances are you don’t want to be measuring, mixing, kneading, resting, shaping, rolling, and frying dough before sunrise. And that means no one gets puris. I’m here to tell you it doesn’t have to be this way. You can wake up at 8 a.m. on a Tuesday morning and be scarfing down a puri with your eggs by 8:15. You can invite 12 of your friends over for brunch and serve puris without breaking a sweat.Puris—deep-fried flatbread—are a beloved breakfast across South Asia. In Pakistan, people wake up early on weekend mornings to drive up to road-side dhabas to get their hands on this flaky, chewy bread. The server comes to your car window, takes your order, and before you know it, brings over a metal tray bejeweled with golden, hot, puffy puris, plus a few sides like aloo bhujia, channa, suji halwa, or fried eggs. The joy of sitting in your car, eating food that is definitely not intended to be eaten in a car, is unparalleled. Half the experience is balancing the tray in your lap, while grease and yolk drip down your wrists, eating as fast as you can, not just because it tastes good, but also because the tray is scalding your thighs.For those of us living in the diaspora, puri can seem inaccessible as a casual breakfast food. Recipes can be extensive and time-consuming, so people often save them for special occasions or weekend projects. This trick involves just two ingredients: tortillas and oil. It’s a technique similar to Mexican and Mexican American dishes like gorditas infladas, salbute, and puffy tacos: fried masa tortillas that puff up like balloons and are served with sweet and savory fillings and toppings. My puri shortcut relies
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Photo by Photographs copyright © 2023 by Laura Murray. Published by Abrams. This post contains products independently chosen (and loved) by our editors and writers. Food52 earns an affiliate commission on qualifying purchases of the products we link to. If you live in North Brooklyn, chances are you’ve already heard of Win Son Restaurant and Win Son Bakery, two establishments (located across the street from one another) that offer their founders’ spin on Taiwanese American cooking. And now, you can make their food at hom
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Since I reported on the darkest corners of the meat industry last year, I haven’t been able to eat anything with a face. It’s a workplace hazard, I guess. Dining on vegetables and grains and tofu is going fine, thanks, but I hadn’t realized how much I’ve been missing the dopamine hit that comes with something like a salty piece of fried chicken, until I was recently presented with a big hunk of cheese at Gem Wine in New York City. The waiter plopped down our main dish: a voluptuous wedge of salt-flecked Gouda haloed by sturdy slices of firm-but-sweet pear, flanked by a pile of marinated peppers and a plate of roasted celery root. I can’t tell you where in the world the cheese came from, or exactly how bad dairy production is for cows and the environment (fairly, probably), but
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Each spring, home cooks who are otherwise reasonably disciplined humans lose all inhibitions at the first sight of ramps at their local farmers markets. This broad, leafy vegetable is beloved for its garlicky flavor, which shines in sauces and vinaigrettes, as well its ability to share the spotlight with more readily available alliums like leeks and scallions. Come springtime, ramp season starts (and quickly ends), and this wild plant makes its way into the kitchens of home cooks, food writers, and greenmarket enthusiasts alike.Ramps tend to grow in the Appalachian mountain range in eastern North America, as far north as Quebec and down through New York, West Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, all the way to Georgia. Given the demand, biologists say that overharvesting is a major concern, so source your ramps from responsible retailers. Read on for how to buy, store, and cook this delicate green.What are ramps, anyway?Ramps (a.k.a. wild leeks or Allium tricoccum) are part of the allium family, which includes other vegetables like chives, garlic, leeks, scallions, and shallots. The word ramps became part of colloquial American English from Southern Appala
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Photo by Bobbi Lin My childhood smelled of maple syrup. After discovering the TikTok-induced reemergence of freezing pancake batter in ice cube trays, my days may once again become maple-scented. Back in a time when there was a clear distinction between good (eating pancakes) and evil (learning math), the classrooms, school buses, and friends I knew almost always smelled like an iHop. Also, everything—and everyone—was always sticky. For whatever reason, as I got older, the pancakes, maple syrup, and stickiness in my life vanished. I’m hoping this TikTok pancake hack will change that. The process is straightforward: make a standard pancake batter, pour it into ice cube trays, add toppings (like blueberries, chocolate chips, or bananas), and keep it frozen until you are ready for homemade pancakes sans measuring, whisking, or excess cleaning. When you’re craving pancakes, pop out a few cubes of batter onto an oiled pan over low heat. Flip once and serve. While meal prepping doesn’t typically excite me, I do appreciate how this technique gives you an opportunity to preserve fruit that may be on its last legs. If you’ve got a couple of berries hanging around (or perhaps a single, nearly-all-brown banana) throw them into the batter cube instead of the trash can. Also—as noted in the comments of the video above—the batter can last in t
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The story of Black History Month begins in 1915 when Dr. Carter G. Woodson—a scholar, historian, and author known as the “Father of Black History”—helped found what is known today as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History. In 1926, Woodson and the association launched an effort to celebrate and encourage the teaching of the history of Black Americans in the nation’s public schools and communities. What began as a week of observance expanded into a month, and since 1976 February has been a time dedicated to honoring the past, present, and future of Black contributions—rich with innovation and brilliance—to American history. Eat the Culture was established to create community-centered spaces that nurture, support, and amplify Black culinary creators. In addition to collaborations like the Black History Month Virtual Potluck, we offer educational resources, virtual courses, and live events to elevate creatives and highlight the culinary heritage across the African diaspora. For Black History Month 2023, Eat the Culture is examining the journey and evolution of different dishes from Africa to North America and beyond. Our goal is to show threads of connection through Black culture and food as a nuanced celebration of joy, resilience, and resistance. Our food is magic and medicine. Our ancestors physically and mentally carried African foodways across the deadly Middle Passage to pass
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The best blenders can do it all, from blitzing your daily smoothie to prepping a big batch of peanut butter or crushing ice cubes for watermelon margaritas. But how to separate the proverbial blender wheat from the chaff? To help guide you in this endeavor, I spoke to associate food editor Kendra Vaculin, who’s tested a jillion blenders (approximately) and offers great insight on the best options for different types of users. According to her and our other BA test kitchen staffers, the best blender overall is the Vitamix 5200—but that’s not the only one she loves. Read on to learn more
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Not to spook you, but zombie fungus is real. Cordyceps, an orangey tendriled fungus, can indeed infect and control the bodies of certain bugs like ants, spiders, and millipedes, among others, effectively turning them into zombies. But it can’t do that to humans, and it’s not likely to lead to a full-blown, world-ending zombie apocalypse. Thanks to HBO’s hit TV show The Last of Us, Cordyceps has been in the spotlight recently. In the show, which is based on a popular video game, Cordyceps has evolved to be able to infect humans, take over their brains, and turn them into mindless monste
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Gnocchi, Tequila, Pickles. This is a list of delicious things but also a collection of very real dog names. While the majority of dogs in America are still called Max or Charlie, drool-worthy food names have been on the rise—and I, personally, am obsessed with this trend. It’s okay; I know a lot of you are reading this, eye-rolling, thinking that modern journalism has gone down the drain, and muttering to yourself that naming dogs after food isn’t a personality. To that I’m simply going to say……I don’t care. Long live us dog-whipped fools.  Don’t take my word for it: Accor
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The only type of pan that’s technically dishwasher-safe is stainless steel—and while this cookware can go in the dishwasher, that doesn’t mean it should. Exposure to excess humidity can cause the pan to corrode over time; you’re better off washing it by hand. Save the prime bottom-rack real estate and give your pots and pans the TLC they deserve. If your favorite pan gets destroyed in the wash, shop some of the test kitchen’s favorite pans for an upgrade.5. Location, location, location.There is an art to organizing the dishwasher. We recommend streamlining the process by dividing the dishwasher into zones: Reserve the lower rack for larger items, such as plates and large bowls. The top rack should house small bowls, cups, mugs, and dishwasher-safe utensils, like 
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Carne asada—a dish of grilled steak marinated in lime juice—is a signature of Northern Mexico, and you’ll find variations across the country. Most carne asada recipes start by marinating a lean cut of beef (like flank, skirt, or flap steak) in a mixture of lime and orange juices, dried chiles, and spices. Here, we take a different approach. Our recipe starts with a dry rub of chile powder, black pepper, garlic powder, cumin, and brown sugar; the sugar tenderizes the steak and, once it hits the heat, caramelizes into a beautiful crust. Citrus, however, can turn bitter when exposed to the fire, so wait until after grilling to brush the meat with an intensely citrusy dressing, made from all the usual carne asada marinade ingredients.Cook the steak on an outdoor grill, preferably charcoa
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This is Highly Recommend, a column dedicated to what people in the food industry are eating, drinking, and buying. Here, Elyse Inamine writes about the best sunrise alarm clock.I tried it all. I stored my phone away from my loft bed, forcing me down some very steep, not-up-to-code stairs. I’d routinely read and reread all the late fees I’d incurred for sleeping through morning circuit training classes. Nothing—not even shame and losing money, my two greatest weaknesses!—got me to refrain from hitting the snooze button and actually rolling out of bed when my alarm would beep. That is, until my very patient husband bought me the JALL Store Wake Up Light Sunrise Alarm Clock.Wake Up Light Sunrise Alarm ClockMarketed for kids and heavy sleepers, the opaque globe is a combination night
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You are not allowed into Chapel Bar. A firm but polite hostess will tell you, smiling, that you may not have a table this evening at the members-only bar located in Manhattan’s Flatiron district. Perhaps you can try nearby New York restaurants Gramercy Tavern or Union Square Cafe, she might suggest, warmly, while showing you toward the exit. In fact, that’s exactly what happened to the lovely couple that walked through the imposing carved wood doors just before me. Chapel Bar has a strict members-only rule, but this evening I’ve somehow managed to weasel myself and a friend in for drinks. Private bars and restaurants like Chapel Bar, for which members pay up to $2,500 in yearly dues and fees, are on the rise across the country. They purport to offer members a more elevated, luxuri
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Joyously messy, and positively vibrating with gutsy flavor, India’s beloved pav bhaji is an exercise in economy. Built from frugal pantry staples like potatoes and onions and green bell peppers, this Mumbai street-style “sandwich” is the answer when you need to clean out the pantry or want to feed a crowd on a dime.Thought to have originated as a quick but filling and nutritious meal for Mumbai’s textile workers, pav bhaji has become a revered Indian street food practically synonymous with Mumbai itself—perhaps just as iconic as Juhu Beach and Bollywood. Vendors usually set up massive cast-iron griddles on portable stove tops roaring with fire. The bhaji cooks in the center while the pav (derived from the Portuguese pao) toasts in puddles of butter along the edges of the pan.In t
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To food editor Shilpa Uskokovic, when it comes to home cooking, cheap is the greatest compliment. Each month, in What a Steal, she’s sharing a highly craveable recipe—and showing us how to save some $$$ along the way.In my house, Friday is officially Fridge Forage Day, a time to root around the fridge (and pantry) like a truffle-hunting piglet, hoping to unearth a treasure. On occasion, it’s something luxurious like a package of mortadella or pristine avocado. Other days, it’s a bruised lemon and very suspicious milk. But every time, the crisper drawer releases some survivors, defeated-looking in their loneliness—a flaccid carrot, a shriveled beet, almost-slimy herbs, broccoli stems from when I was feeling ambitious and wanted to save the world, one gnarly stub at a time. I try
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Photo by Alex Lau, food styling by Susie Theodorou, prop styling by Heather GreeneLike spicy shrimp stir-fry, coconutty stew, and creamy pasta.January has been all about recipes with dazzling, glossy, sticky sauces and dressings. Take, for example, Sheet-Pan Orange Tofu and Broccoli, which glistens with a sweet-tangy citrus sauce. Or Chicken Piccata, which has a luscious, velvety sauce with the ultimate trio: butter, lemon, and capers. Or this ranch dressing that’s embraced the phrase “new year, new me” with the addition of nutty, toasted sesame and crumbled seaweed snacks. Any way you want to douse your dishes, we are all about it. Use the list below to whirl some joy into your weeknight meals.Photo by Chelsie Craig, Styling by Molly BazSimple Pasta CarbonaraHumble ingredients—egg
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Trader Joe’s New Year’s resolutions seem to be: Air-fry until there’s no air left, give the people cabbage—so much cabbage—and invent snacks that confound and distract us from the tedium of modern life (or from investigative articles about how its dark chocolate was found to contain dangerous levels of lead). Have you tried the new corn ribs? I sure did! January’s new products accomplish those resolutions and more. Frozen DelightsHerbs de Provence Potato WedgesOh là là, what do we have here? Potato wedges are speckled with herbs that get near burnt in the air fryer as the wedges get crispy. Still, they’re fries, a perfect food. I added flaky salt (needed) and dipped in mayo (wanted), and I’m happy with the direction my life is headed. Stir Fried Garlicky CabbageIf infl
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This is Highly Recommend, a column dedicated to what people in the food industry are eating, drinking, and buying right now. Here, Alaina Chou writes about the squeezable tahini she drizzles on just about everything.Tahini is to me what garlic is to garlic girls. It’s one of my favorite ingredients to use in both savory and sweet contexts—I love a tahini-based dressing for my salad just as much as I love to drizzle it over a bowl of brown-sugar-laced oatmeal. But for years I felt I couldn’t use tahini without the potential of greasy countertops and a ruined shirt. Despite my best efforts, I’d somehow always end up sloshing separated oil over the sides of the jar as I tried to stir and homogenize its contents. It’s a process I would reluctantly commit myself to for recipes that
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Tom Hanks would eat Tom Cruise’s coconut Bundt cake for his last mealI thought I was aware of all the celebrity foods, in part because it’s important for me to know which foods are popular but may not actually taste that good. No fault of theirs; if it were my full-time job to be thin as it is for many celebrities, I too wouldn’t be prioritizing the most delicious foods. So I was surprised that I had not heard of this famous Tom Cruise cake, which he supposedly sends to his celebrity friends every year for Christmas. It’s a $110 white chocolate Bundt cake from Doan’s Bakery—a coconut cake with what appears to be an extremely thick layer of cream cheese frosting. Most recently, Tom Hanks said he would eat it as one of his last meals. Many fellow plebeians claim the cake is ind
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Welcome to The Receipt, a series documenting how Bon Appétit readers eat and what they spend doing it. Each food diary follows one anonymous reader’s week of expenses related to groceries, restaurant meals, coffee runs, and every bite in between. In this time of rising food costs, The Receipt reveals how folks—from different cities, with different incomes, on different schedules—are figuring out their food budgets.In today’s Receipt, a 23-year-old college student makes most of his food purchases with food stamps while juggling class and work. Keep reading for his receipts.Jump ahead:The financesThe dietThe expensesThe diaryThe financesWhat are your pronouns? He/him/his What is your occupation? I am a full-time student at a local university studying natural resources and sustai
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I’m not huge on New Year’s resolutions, and I didn’t exactly go into 2023 with a plan. I did, however, enter the year intent on eating very well, and if this roundup is any indication, so did the rest of our team. My highlights of the month were a beautiful sweet-salty beef carpaccio from a Cambodian pop-up I follow around New York like a Deadhead, and a carbonara-ish dry ramen from a San Francisco chef’s counter featuring uni and cured salmon roe that melted into a sort of briny pasta sauce. Other staffers’ best meals included life-changing okonomiyaki in Coral Gables, Florida, a caramelized onion torta in New York, and plenty more signs that, if nothing else, it’s going to be a very tasty year. —Elazar Sontag, restaurant editorBuddy3115 22nd St., San FranciscoIt was a huge
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In Baking Hows, Whys, and WTFs, food editor Shilpa Uskokovic will answer your burning baking questions and share her tips and tricks for flawless sweets. Today: Can you use applesauce instead of oil or butter for baking?When I was asked this, my first reaction was: Are people really doing this? Substituting fruit for fat? Then I remembered my aunt, a self-certified “health nut” who scrabbles for raspberries during her hikes and runs an almonds-for-snacks household. She once told me that she made a chocolate cake but used applesauce instead of oil. “It tasted good, but I had to use my electric knife to cut it.”So this is for my aunt and everyone else like her. In a nutshell, the answer to the question, “Can I replace oil or butter with applesauce?” is a resounding, “Sometimes.” Let me explain. Whether store-bought or homemade, unsweetened applesauce is just cooked and puréed apples. It contains lots of water, some natural sugar, fiber, and pectin. This high water content is both good (because it adds moisture to the final product) and bad (because high moisture = more gluten development = tough cakes). Pastries made with oil or butter are soft and tender because the fat surrounds the flour particles, preventing strong gluten bonds from forming. Fat also opens up and amplifies fat-soluble flavor molecules (in other words, it tastes good). Fully cutting out fat from your sweets will have dramatic results. But it’s not all bad news. There are some situations where you can exchange applesauce for oil or butter. Here's the fine print.Proceed with caution.Recipes containing oil or melted (not solid) butter are a good place to start experimenting with appl
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Brownies invite a lot of opinions: Fudgy or cakey? Crispy edge or gooey, chewy center? Naked or topped with ice cream? But if there’s something we can all agree on (at least, here at BA HQ), it
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