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Don’t break a sweat looking for the perfect summer steak recipe. We’ve got what you need right here.Some like it saucy. Some like it skewered. But no matter who you’re firing up the charcoal for, these grilled steak recipes got you covered through the end of the summer season. Steak traditionalists, look no further—you can’t go wrong serving up plates of this classic Skirt Steak with B.A.1. Sauce (our own riff on the bottled stuff). If you’re in search of a crowd-pleasing cut to wow your cookout crew, can we recommend a BBQ steak recipe so perfect for a group gathering that we named it Party Steak? But there’s more to it than just serving up a hunk of beef. Try it paired with blistered beans and tomatoes or mixed in with greens for a balanced steak salad. Oh, and pro-tip: before mealtime hits, make sure to freshen up on your grill skills with our step-by-step photo guide to grilling steak. Fire it up, friends, and make one of these grilled steak recipes tonight!Photo by Alex Lau, food styling by Susie Theodorou, prop styling by Amy WilsonSoy Sauce–Marinated Grilled Flank Steak and ScallionsFlank steak is flavorful but quite lean. To make sure it's as tender and juicy as possible, be careful not to overcook it (medium-rare is best) and be absolutely certain you’re slicing against the grain.Photographs by Alex Lau, food styling by Susie Theodorou, prop styling by Aneta FlorczykPorterhouse With Summer Au Poivre SauceGetting a porterhouse steak to a blushing, consistent medium-rare is a feat—but the key is to keep it moving.Photographs by Alex Lau, food styling by Susie Theodorou, prop styling by Aneta FlorczykSkirt Steak With BA.1. SauceSupremely beefy, not outrageously expensive, and fast-cooking, skirt steak is our favorite steak of all.Photographs by Alex Lau, food styling by Susie Theodorou, prop styling by Aneta FlorczykLacquered Rib EyeThe umami-rich lacquer on this steak works its magic to create an über-savory capital-C Crust akin to the bark beloved by barbecue enthusiasts.Photographs by Alex Lau, food styling by Susie Theodorou, prop styling by Aneta FlorczykHasselback Short Rib BulgogiThis technique is ideal for home grilling, featuring marinated boneless short ribs (inspired by bulgogi) that get cooked right on the grate for maximum crispy bits, charred edges, and burnt ends.Photographs by Alex Lau, food styling by Susie Theodorou, prop styling by Aneta FlorczykCoconut and Lemongrass Steak SkewersMore caramelization, more surface area to char, a quick cook time, and easy to share pieces are only a few of skewering’s advantages.Photo by Emma Fishman, Food Styling by Rebecca Jurkevich Short Rib Tacos With Cilantro-Lime SlawShort ribs aren’t just for braising. Boneless short ribs in particular can be grilled like steak, but be sure to cook them to medium doneness, just long enough to render fat and tenderize, without letting them overcook or toughen. A 20-minute rest is ideal for keeping them juicy.Photo by Alex Lau, food styling by Rebecca Jurkevich, prop styling by Amy WilsonGrilled Short Ribs with Pickled DaikonIf you’ve ever had kalbi at a Korean barbecue restaurant, you’ve had grilled flanken-style sho
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All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.One Sunday evening, nearly 20 years ago, a friend’s mother gave me two gifts.The first, a cooking lesson, came just before dinner. While the chicken she roasted rested on a platter, she splashed white wine into the still-hot cast-iron skillet, where it immediately bubbled up, nearly disappearing. Then, with a tool I had never seen before—whisk-like but flat-bottomed—she dislodged all of the browned bits stuck to the
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Photo by Julia Gartland I grew up in a house pretty much devoid of candles, unacquainted with their simple pleasures until I flew the nest. My mother is very scent-sensitive (seriously, the woman can catch a whiff of a Reese’s peanut butter cup from 15 feet away) and is an insurance adjuster who’s seen too many house fires start from unattended candles. So, I discovered the
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All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.This is Highly Recommend, a column dedicated to what people in the food industry are obsessed with eating, drinking, and buying right now.I’m standing in the kitchen, sucking all the oxygen out of a bottle of wine I didn’t finish.I’m vacuum-sealing an apple fritter into a smushed brick for someone special’s lucky day dessert.I’m watching nearly expired leeks get preserved in plastic, squeezed and compressed like a sorority sister in a bandage dress.I LOVE MY VACUUM SEALER.While researching new kitchen appliances because it’s my job and my passion, I came across Zwilling’s Fresh & Save vacuum food storage system. I don’t sous vide, so I’d never had much use for vacuum sealing—but what a world I was missing! A world without oxygen.The Zwilling Fresh & Save vacuum pump is a handheld, cordless, rechargeable mini-vac about the size of a pepper grinder. By vacuum sealing your leftovers, from lasagna to parsley to spelt flour, you can extend their shelf life by days-to-weeks-to-months. (You could also use them to store dry pantry goods, like in the photo above.) Zwilling says food lasts, on average, five times longer when it’s vac-sealed, and since ~30 percent of the food we bring home from the store ends up being wasted (oof), it’s nice to think that we might waste slightly less by using this thing. If you’re only cooking for one, the vacuum sealer is a godsend for leftover ingredients that might otherwise go bad, like avocado halves. (They don’t brown!!)Photo Courtesy Zwilling How it worksFirst, you need the reusable plastic bags and/or containers—which come in plastic or glass—that Zwilling makes to go along with the vacuum pump. (That part is annoying, because I hate having mismatched containers. But this is a whole system, so they envision this being your one-and-only, I guess.) The containers are dishwasher-safe, but you’re better off hand-washing the bags so you can get into the corners.With the vacuum-sealable bags, you can sous-vide if you’re into that, or use them to compactly store cookie dough and whatnot in your freezer, as I did, so you have more room for your quart containers of meal-prep martinis.Both the containers and bags have these round
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We’ve teamed up with Miele to share smart tips and tricks for making your cleaning routine more productive. But before you get started, you’ll need the right tools—check out Miele’s HomeCare collection to find out which of their vacuum cleaners is right for you. There are two types of people in this world: those precious few that thrive on the before-and-after thrill of deep-cleaning a toilet and...the rest of us. For many (raises hand), cleaning remains something to avoid or procrastinate through creative clutter shuffling. But what if cleaning could become the most productive part of your day—where you not only get the living room rug fluffy and clean, but you also catch up on that true-crime podcast episode you’ve been meaning to listen to. Radical idea? We think not. With a bit of reframing, you can make the most of your cleaning routine and create an efficient habit that makes your space a place you want to spend time in. And the payoff when those chores are done and you’ve also taken a relaxing bath? Now, that’s an endorphin rush we all want. Here are seven ideas for making your cleaning routine more productive, and—let’s face it—all-around less boring. 1. Create a home calendar that focuses on results, rather than chores. Chore wheels? That sounds like, well, a chore. Instead, try creating a home calendar that pairs specific tasks with personal benefit. The idea is to focus on how you’ll feel after completing a task, rather than the task itself. So, instead of writing, “Pick up clutter before leaving the house,” try something like, “A clean home makes me feel less anxious and lets me relax at the end of the day.” I started a home calendar at the beginning of the year and I have to say, I’m sincerely a fan. (I actually do the chores now!) My calendar includes gems like, “Morning coffee tastes better out of a clean mug” (aka, do the dishes) and, “Meditative soaks in the bath help me sleep better” (clean the tub). 2. Vacuum all the floors while listening to your favorite podcast. Here’s a very modern problem: too many great podcasts, too little time to listen. By combining a repetitive task like vacuuming with headphones and a favorite podcast, you’re truly reaching the peak of your multitasking potential. For a vacuum that can go anywhere in the house with you and your podcast, Miele’s HomeCare collection of vacuums are a great option—they’re lightweight and have a large vacuuming radius, so you can move around with ease. There are various models to choose from, so you can find the right vacuum and accessories that are a good fit for your home. 3. Make your bathtub sparkle, then take a relaxing soak. To become the person who takes calm, relaxing baths on the regular, you must first become the person with a clean bathtub. The new, spa-like you is possible with the combination of hot-hot water and oxygen bleach. Create a simple paste and apply the mixture to the tub, give it 20 to 30 mi
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Weeks before Ramadan begins, my friends and I talk Ramadan strategy. We obsess over the details in texts and voice notes, sometimes a phone call—though those are trickier with our different time zones. My community is scattered across the globe. My parents worked in Singapore, Taiwan, Qatar, and more throughout my childhood; wherever they went, I went too—including Palestine, where my father is from (though I’ve never been to Mexico, where my mother’s parents were born). I went to college in the U.S., but I’ve rarely stayed in the States for longer than seven months—until the pandemic.Ramadan prep hasn’t changed much, though, because each Ramadan is different, and fasting must be tweaked accordingly. Everyone has their own approach. This year a friend boldly announced via voice note that she’d be drinking coffee at suhoor. Others reported they are easing their kids into Ramadan with half-day fasts—the beginning of a lifelong lesson in how giving up food from sunrise to sunset can be an act of divine love. And because they know me so well, my friends ask how I’m going to run this year. They know it grounds me and, with little exception, I cannot give up running for Ramadan. I enjoy these exchanges, but I wonder if they’re special because non-Muslims often don’t see me as a complex human being.However open I am to my Muslim friends, I talk less and less about my personal life with many of the non-Muslims I know. I’ve learned to do this especially around colleagues. It’s ironic because we’re historians of Islam, but people who study Islam don’t necessarily understand Muslims. This comes up when they ask about my Ramadans. Once, while I was living in Cairo, another foreign historian invited me to talk shop in the gardens of a liberal arts university. I nodded blankly as she ran through the standard laundry list of complaints—particularly how ungrateful Egyptians were to her, a white woman, for writing their history. Then, maybe because she noticed she was the only one talking, she brought up Ramadan, which wasn’t for a few months. I could feel it coming, that expectation of what a Muslim is or isn’t; by now, I can see the signs like small tremors before an earthquake. So I wasn’t surprised when she asked, or rather stated, “Do you fast? You must. Do you break your fast on dates?”In a split second, I processed the implications of this narrow question. There is no one way to fast, as there is no one way to be Muslim. I have prayed jumaa in mosques in Seoul, where the khutba was spoken in three languages. I know what it’s like to break my fast on olives and honey I harvested on my own land, in Palestine. And many are exempted from fasting: people who breastfeed, or those who have diabetes. I wanted to say this all to my fellow historian but instead chose to challenge her assumption.“I break my fast after I finish running, on a sports drink,” I said.I could practically see her brain stop working. She was silent for a moment, but soon proceeded to lecture me about dehydration and how I was damaging my body.Even though I didn’t see her again, I’ve encountered many people like her, people who assume
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Restaurant Diaries is a weekly series featuring four different people working in the industry. Each week you’ll hear from one of them: wine educator Kyla Peal, bartender turned brand ambassador Jenny Feldt, farmer Kristyn Leach, and line cook Peter Steckler. Here Steckler shares how American Elm, the Denver restaurant he works at, is helping back-of-house workers make a living wage. Read his previous diary entries here.The big news here is that Denver restaurants can now operate at 100 percent capacity, as long as there’s still six feet of spacing between tables. We’re still at 50 percent at American Elm because our dining room isn’t big enough to seat at full capacity with the spaci
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Shopping at Trader Joe’s can be quite the overwhelming grocery store experience. The beloved chain boasts thousands of affordable products, many of which come earmarked with a “best ever” accolade from the dozens of rankings, lists, and articles you can find on the good ol’ internet. But there is, perhaps, no more intimidating section of the store than the Trader Joe’s cheese "wall"—a library (nay, a veritable archive!) of dairy concoctions in different shapes and colors, both familiar and obscure. To help you navigate this plethora of milky goodness, we’ve rounded up 11 must-have cheeses for anyone who needs assistance in narrowing down the best of
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I have a honey guy, and his name is Jay. (This is a brag.) Jay, who looks like he wrestles on the side, sells his local honey at my farmers’ market. I buy big jars of his raw honey, which he slow-churns to give it an airy, foamy texture that dissolves on the tongue. And honestly, it has a barnyard stank. When people come over, I make them sniff the jar. I eat a spoonful of honey before I exercise (nature’s Gu) or when my throat itches, and I mix it with butter to top biscuits. I love the stuff.You can scrape honey off a honeycomb and eat it right there on the spot. It’s ready to go. But because honey is an animal product, any stuff that’s imported has to be heated (pasteurized) befor
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We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again, all the way through Labor Day: Eating outdoors is one of the greatest joys of summertime. As the weather gods play nice and the days get warmer, our focus naturally shifts to wanting to take some of our fettered lives outdoors—to our newly-blooming backyards and gardens. But when your kitchen is inside—and the warm weather outside—you can start to feel a little separate from the action. The family’s gathered around the patio, or playing cornhole on the lawn, while you’re indoors, grabbing (more) ice or dressing the salad. It’s these moments that inspire a common condition known as “Outdoor Kitchen Jea
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Mantou is an extremely versatile dough—you can stuff it, pan-fry it, wrap it around ingredients, or just eat it plain. (Mantou are plain, soft steamed breads, whereas bao are stuffed—often made with a char siu filling or served with roast duck instead of pancakes.) Mantou make for a great snack, a quick breakfast, or an accompaniment to a large banquet meal. They have a craveable, balanced sweetness, but my favorite trait is the texture: pillowy soft, light, and fluffy.For this recipe, which is from my restaurant, Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco, and pulled from the cookbook, we add milk and cream, which cut through the gluten, giving the mantou an even more tender crumb than t
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A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. Psst, did you hear we’re coming out with a cookbook? We’re coming out with a cookbook! By definition, a latke is a potato pancake—fried in enough oil to splatter your forearms and make your home smell like a state fair
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