Balance out your dinner menu with these healthyish dishes. Photo by Alex Lau, Food Styling by Yekaterina BoytsovaFrom sticky, glazed sweet potatoes to roast-y, caramelized cabbage, these healthy Thanksgiving recipes fit in perfectly with all their fall flavors and textures.  Because in our book, there’s only one rule on Thanksgiving: the food should be delicious. And trust us, your table needs more green beans topped with crispy shallots and gluten-free wild rice dressing. This list goes beyond appetizers and veggies, too. Celiac friends coming over? This decadent coconut pie is coincidentally gluten-free without compromising flavor. (Same with the turkey!) Read on for more of our fave healthy Thanksgiving recipes that'll make any holiday dinner a memorable one. Photograph by Emma Fishman, Food styling by Susie Theodorou, Prop styling by Sophie LengGreen Beans and Mushrooms With Crispy ShallotsWhen Thanksgiving demands green bean casserole but your jam-packed oven has other plans, opt for this buttery stovetop version.Photograph by Emma Fishman, Food styling by Susie Theodorou, Prop styling by Sophie LengBitter Greens With Cranberry DressingYour Thanksgiving spread doesn’t just need a salad—it needs THIS salad with a bright, tart-sweet cranberry dressing.Photograph by Emma Fishman, Food styling by Susie Theodorou, Prop styling by Sophie LengKale Salad With Pecan VinaigretteA Thanksgiving salad should have enough flavor and heft to hold its own, and be sturdy enough to dress ahead of time—this one checks all those boxes.Photograph by Jenny Huang, Food styling by Susie Theodorou, prop styling by Martha BernabeAsian Pear Salad With Peanut-Lime DressingThis sweet-tart salad gets its satisfying crisp-crunchy texture from floral Asian pears and nutty raw cauliflower.Photograph by Jenny Huang, Food styling by Susie Theodorou, prop styling by Martha BernabeSweet Potato TianThin rounds baked until tender and crispy-edged in a warming five-spice brown butter sauce might just be our new favorite way to serve sweet potatoes.Photo by Alex Lau, food styling by Susie Theodorou, prop styling by Elizabeth JaimeBrussels Sprouts With Cranberry MostardaCranberry mostarda
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When you picture bourbon and whiskey, what comes to mind? Bonfires and campgrounds, buffalo plaid, a cozy knit blanket, and maybe some softly falling snow, right? But bourbon is delicious 365 days a year—it all depends on the type of bourbon you choose and how you shake (or stir) it up for a cocktail. But before we dive in to our favorite bourbon cocktail recipes, let’s get a brief bourbon 101. For starters, what’s the difference between bourbon and whiskey? “All bourbon is whiskey, but not all whiskey is bourbon,” explains Ashley Barnes, co-founder and master blender for Off-Hours Bourbon. “Whiskey is the overall category, and bourbon is a subclass within that category,” she says. In order for whiskey to be classified as bourbon, Barnes says that it must be made with 51 percent corn, has to be aged in a new charred oak barrel, and must be made in the United States. When tasting bourbon, look beyond the usual vanilla and caramel
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We’ve teamed up with Albertsons Companies to share our top grocery-shopping tips and tricks to get you through the busy school season—and beyond. Up first: smart ideas for simplifying breakfast, lunch, dinner, and everything in between with help from FreshPass™, a handy grocery subscription program with perks like unlimited free delivery, a $5 monthly credit for annual subscribers, and a VIP customer service line you can reach any time. Want to give it a test run? Start your free 30-day trial right here. The start of September always brings with it an element of excitement—and busy schedules. There’s the changing seasons, anticipation of the holidays to come, and for parents, it means that school is fully in swing. With the uncertainty of the last year and a half, this normally hectic time has an added layer of stress. The one thing that doesn’t have to be? Meal time. Streamline your cooking routine—all while pulling together delicious, satisfying dishes the whole family will want to eat—with a few of these handy tips and tricks. Photo by Rocky Luten 1. Give Grocery Delivery a Try I’ve been a huge proponent of grocery delivery since my first job in a test kitchen. There were many days when there were just too many groceries for me to carry, and it wasn’t feasible to get everything I needed in a single trip. Having groceries delivered allowed me the ability to get more important tasks done, and to plan my week more effectively. Since then, I’ve incorporated grocery delivery into a regular part of my week. I like to use the FreshPass™ subscription program, which gives you unlimited free delivery (in as little as two hours in most areas, no less), an option to DriveUp & Go™ (aka have your groceries dropped off to your car), plus exclusive savings—all of which adds up to more time to get things done and money saved. 2. Make a Grocery Plan—But First, Take Stock of Your Pantry Before getting started with a weekly grocery plan, do a pantry inventory to see what you already have on hand. Running low on olive oil, or only have one can of tuna left? This is the time to stock up on pantry essentials. Think about ingredients that are regularly used and can transform into more than one meal throughout the day, like oats, canned beans, nut butters, frozen berries, pasta, and whole grains. 3. Assess Your Storage Container Situation While you’re scouring the pantry, don’t forget to take a look at your storage situation. What good is meal planning without storage, right? Twice a year I go through my storage container selection and make sure I have plenty of sets. I opt for glass, dishwasher-friendly containers in a variety of different sizes—not only are they a cinch to clean, but you can use them over and over again without tossing a single thing in the trash. 4. Load Up on Breakfast Essentials We all know breakfast is the most important meal of the day—especially for kids—so lean into the perks of grocery delivery and plan on getting a variety of easy breakfast options like cereal, oats, and whole-grain waffles. It takes a little extra planning, but taking a few hours out of a Sunday to make a batch of freezer breakfast burritos or prepping overnight oats makes a huge difference in making busy mornings a little easier on the whole family. 5. Don’t Forget the Snacks Any pro meal planner knows you’ve got to think beyond the standard three meals a day. While options like fresh fruit are always great to have on hand, this is the time to stock up on great non-perishable snacks like apple sauce, snack bars, trail mix, and various types of crackers. With a FreshPass™ subscription, you get 5% off O Organics® and Open Nature® products, making it even easier to buy family-friendly options in bulk (I always try to buy non-perishables in bulk when possible since it’s more cost-effective and ensures you never run out of options). 6. Keep Plenty of Condiments and Spreads On-Hand There’s a good chance you already have the trio of mustard, mayo, and ketchup (classic kid favorites), but if you want to take your meal prep to the next level, start experimenting with other options. I love keeping a selection of hot sauce, chili crisp, Sriracha, teriyaki, ranch, and even salsa in my fridge to take meals in whatever direction I’m feeling. Grilled chicken becomes more exciting with a side of BBQ sauce, raw veggies are oh-so snack-able dunked in hummus, and I love having peanut sauce to twirl into soba noodles for a quick weeknight dinner (it also makes great leftovers). 7. Put Your Freezer to Work While meal planning does take some foresight, there’s nothing better than not having to think about what you’re going to make for dinner (or lunch or breakfast). When looking for recipes to meal-prep, I think about making sure there’s a balance between choosing dishes I’ll be genuinely excited to eat weeks—even months—down the line and ones that are hearty and satisfying. Here are a couple of freezer-ready dinner recipes I like to keep in my regular rotation during the fall: Pesto Make the most of the last basil of the season by prepping big batches of pesto. You can, of course, twirl it with pasta, but you can also save it as a spread for sandwiches, spoon it over baked salmon, or even use it as a dip alongside some fresh-cut veggies. You can freeze it in an old ice-cube tray so you always have a tablespoon or two at the ready (without having to defrost a whole batch). Ingredients to order: basil, pine nuts, salt, olive oil, garlic, Pecorino Romano, Parmigiano-Reggiano Lentil & Sausage Soup with Kale When the weather cools down, there’s nothing more comforting to me than lentil soup. This version is loaded with chicken sausage and kale, but you can swap in your favorite sausage and just about any hearty green. I like freezing batches of the soup in 32-ounce containers and transferring one to the fridge the morning I plan to eat it for dinner (it’ll be defrosted and ready to heat come evening). Ingredients to order: olive oil, carrots, celery, onion, garlic, salt, green lentils, canned tomatoes, thyme, rosemary, chicken sausage, kale Crockpot Beef Stew Perhaps the greatest gift to meal preppers was the invention of the slow cooker. On Sunday mornings, I’ll just throw everything in the slow cooker and by dinnertime there’s a hearty beef stew on the table. I like to double—or even triple—the recipe so I can freeze the leftovers for those nights when I don’t feel like cooking. Ingredients to order: beef chuck roast, salt, pepper, flour, olive oil, carrots, celery, pearl onions, garlic, cremini mushrooms, Worcestershire sauce, beef broth, parsley, rice, potatoes Greek Chicken Meatballs Mix up your usual meatballs with this Greek-inspired, chicken-based recipe. Meatballs are so versatile since you can pack them up for lunch or freeze a big batch. Serve them with pita, orzo, rice, roast vegetables—the possibilities are endless. Ingredients to order: cooking spray, garlic, eggs, white onion, panko bread crumbs, dried oregano, dried mint, salt, ground chicken, yogurt, parsley, dill, black pepper Chicken Fingers Who doesn’t love chicken nuggets? This kid-friendly meal is equally exciting for adults. By making them yourself, you can ensure exactly
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Photo by Linda Xiao Stop what you’re doing and check your onions. Then, depending on what you see—chuck ’em, compost ’em, whatever you need to do! There is a massive (and I mean, massive) outbreak of salmonella in raw onions that has already impacted 37 states in the U.S. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, consumers should refrain from buying or eating any whole fresh red, white, or yellow onions if they were imported from Chihuahua, Mexico and distributed by ProSource Inc. So how do you know if your onions are impacted? If you purchased a bag of onions (generally sold in three- or five-pound quanties), there should be a tag that tells you where the onions were grown and which company distributed them. If they were grown in the U.S., they're safe (for now). However, if the label says that they were grown in Chihuahua, Mexico, get rid of 'em. Furthermore, if you only purchased one or two onions from a large grocery store display, there is no easy way to know where they're from. In that case, it's safest to assume they're contaminated. Per the CDC’s food safety alert, which was announced on Wednesday, October 20th, more than 600 people have experienced food poisoning after consuming the onions and over 100 people have been hospitalized. At this time, the onions have not been formally recalled and there have been no deaths. ProSource Inc., which distributed the onions to grocery stores and restaurants across the United States, says that the most recent batch of Mexican-grown onions were imported on August 27th, 2021 but many could still be in consumer’s homes or on grocery store shelves, as they are shelf-stable for up to three months. If you are unsure of where your onions were grown, it’s best to throw them out or try to return them to the place of purchase for a refund. Using hot soap
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Photo by Julia Gartland Some cookie recipes call for pans to be lined with parchment paper; others want silicone baking mats. Some say to grease the cookie sheet, or grease and flour the baking pans. I sometimes call for lining pans with foil! What’s the (dare I say, cookie) scoop on all of this? What is the best way to line baking she
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I’ve always wanted to be the person who plots their meals meticulously, with particular days for pizza, roast chicken, and meatless dinners. Instead, I’m the sort that runs to the store twice in one hour because I forgot the lemons the first time, and I rarely eat the same meal with any degree of frequency. There is, however, a beacon of strict order among all of this chaos—a biweekly taco night, never to be missed and always fervently anticipated.Lately, the Adobo Mushroom Tacos from Edgar Castrejón’s book Provecho: 100 Vegan Mexican Recipes to Celebrate Culture and Community are my
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The holidays usually offer (most of) us some reprieve from the chaos of everyday life, but the pandemic has added another layer of confusion and stress. Life right now is anything but perfect, and for some of us, giving a bunch of perfectly-wrapped presents may not be the vibe, or may not be feasible. Thankfully, a white elephant party lets you revel in this imperfect mess with gifts that are so irrelevant you can’t imagine how they were made, or so genius that you can't imagine how you don't already own five of them. They take the pressure out of finding the perfect present and instead make gift giving about spending time with people you love. I still remember my first one even a decade later. It wasn’t the preppy headband set I left with that made its mark on me, but the pure, unadulterated joy of watching friends and family try to steal each other's gifts and the belly laughs that came with it. Keep reading for 25 white elephant gifts under $25 that anyone would love—and steal. Photo by Etsy 1. Kelly Loves Type WFH "Sorry, I Was on Mute" Mug, $22+ This cheeky mug feels apropos for anyone who’s been working from home for the last 500+ days. Because, honestly, who hasn’t been there? Photo by Urban Outfitters 2. Smoko Squishy, $14 This adorable dumpling is almost too cute to squish, but it makes for the perfect stress ball, fidget toy, or desk accessory. Photo by Ty Mecham & James Ransom 3. Big Little Recipes, by Emma Laperruque (Signed Copy), $24 Inspired by our award-winning column Big Little Recipes, this book is filled with 60 brand-new recipes that any home cook can master and with less than five ingredients to boot. Photo by Amazon 4. Tabasco Sauce Keychain, $11.88 For those who can’t eat a meal without some extra spice, this travel-sized Tabasco bottle is the perfect
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I remember the exact moment I was introduced to the Benriner mandoline slicer, a.k.a. the kitchen tool that changed the way I cook. I was 16, working on the line alongside a much wiser cook named Tamar Adler (who went on to write An Everlasting Meal). After spooning warm brandade onto toast, she braced her plastic, mint-green mandoline against her cutting board and slid a fennel bulb against the stainless steel blade. The bulb gave way immediately into feathery, sheer wisps—the visual and textural topper I didn’t even know the dish needed. A decade, five restaurants, and three test kitchens later, I can say without a doubt that, after my chef’s knife, the mandoline is the tool I reach for most. With a swipe against the sharp blade, veggies that are otherwise a pain to prep turn easily into uniform, thin slices. Raw fibrous beets are transformed into translucent disks. Cucumbers become paper-thin ribbons. A mandoline takes your cooking to a whole new aesthetic level (now you know how chefs make salad look so good). Benriner has been making the best mandoline slicer, in my opinion, since the 1940s. This Japanese mandoline isn't just more efficient than a knife; it does things no knife can do. Benriner updated the design in 2018, and although it's a little flashier than the one Tamar kept in her kit, it's still easy to use—even if you're a beginner home cook—and sharp as hell. (You can also find the old version on Amazon at bargain prices.) The new Benriner hand-held mandoline—which comes in Classic, Super, and Jumbo sizes—has an adjustable straight blade. With a twist of a knob on the underside, you can tweak the thickness setting depending on whether you want razor-thin garlic or thicker rounds for a gratin. Also included are three julienne blades of different thicknesses so you can slice carrots into delicate matchsticks for gado-gado rolls or potatoes for french fries. When the blades gets dull, just unscrew the knobs on either side to remove and swap them out—a nice, money-saving feature compared to other vegetable slicers with non-replaceable blades. Benriner Mandoline (Old Version)A note on safety: Mandoline blades are no joke, so make sure you hold whatever you're slicing in your palm with your fingertips out of the way. Or use the Benriner's sturdy hand guard, which grips food on one side and protects your fingers on the other. And if you're still nervous about those blades, get yourself a pair of cut-resistant gloves.3 ways to use a mandoline:Rounds: Circles of cukes, beets, kohlrabi, or radishes make a crunchy salad base or chic garnish, depending on what slice thickness you select. If you want to attempt homemade potato chips, this is your cut.Ribbons: Anything oblong—carrots, zucchini—goes from unwieldy to elegant faster than a makeover montage.Matchsticks: The scary blades with teeth-like prongs are for shredding and making julienne cuts—but if you lose those extra blades, you can always just shave your veg into slices, stack, turn, and slice again with a knife.Use your mandoline to make this now:Asian Pear Salad With Peanut-Lime DressingThis sweet-tart salad gets its satisfying crisp-crunchy texture from fl
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Should you ask your guests to bring something? How do you keep people out of the kitchen? How do you serve everything at the right temp? Feel like you've forgotten how to be a good host? (Same.) In our latest series, Be My Guest, a friendly expert takes on questions from our community and deftly puts fears to rest, suggesting all the ways in which we can all get back to hosting safely—and confidently. It is (almost) the holidays after all! If you’re anything like me, you’ve had a handful of parties on hold for anywhere from six to 18 months. (I’ve never been one to whimper at the prospect of aging, but I still maintain that I haven’t turned 32 yet, since the corresponding celebration hasn’t happened.) Some of us have spent hours—days! weeks!—of the pandemic daydreaming about little bowls of Ruffles potato chips set about the apartment, halls decked with mistletoe, Lambrusco in ice buckets, dance party playlists, and long tables lit with tall candles that cast a glow on the unmasked faces we love best. As vaccinated numbers rise, many of us are cautiously throwing parties again. I’m still not ready to throw that 200-person birthday rager that I cancelled in March 2020—the extension is keeping me young, after all—but I’ve got a tentative date for a toned-down return of my annual holiday party, and am back to hosting dinners for small groups of friends at the new dinner table I scored on Craigslist while in lockdown redecoration frenzy. This means necessarily dusting off my favorite serveware, digging out my placemats from the crevices of my linen closet, and—perhaps the most creaky resurrection of them all—remembering how to throw a party in the first place. In a way, it’s like riding a bike: you invite your friends over, put something in the oven, dress yourself the way a famished person eats (with excess and gusto), make a playlist, and eventually a party will happen. But it’s still easy for many of us to feel rusty at this whole hosting business, especially as the capital-H Holidays approach. So today I’m taking some questions from our community (i.e. you, dear readers) on party prep, in hopes that we can all feel a little more confident and breezy when that first doorbell chimes. Do you ask guests (who ask) to bring something specific (bottle of white or pie for dessert) or no? I am going to let you in on a little secret here. People love being told what to do. Especially now, when we all feel that we’ve lost our social graces—maybe they’re off somewhere hanging out with the five hundred hair ties we’ve also lost over the last ten years. Sure, not every person falls into this category, but I promise you that if there’s something you’d like your guests to bring, they’d be happy to bring it. They’re probably wondering what they can bring anyway; isn’t it the act of a gracious host, then, to rid them of any worry and simply provide them with the correct answer? Of course, your requests need to be reasonable. If you
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Welcome to Dream Dinner Party, where we ask notable figures to describe just that: the dinner party of their dreams.After four acclaimed seasons, Insecure, the groundbreaking hit from Issa Rae, is coming to an end (catch the fifth and final season premiere on October 24). We’re sad to see it go, but maybe that will give Rae time to host her fantasy dinner party, with platters of food, plenty of drinks, and a collection of legendary musicians.Which three people would you invite to your dream dinner party?I’m obsessed with musical artistry, so I would choose Frank Ocean, Solange, and Prince. I feel they would have a good time together. The only insecurity I have is what I would bring to t
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Feeling a little out of practice when it comes to holiday hosting? Us too.Photograph by Emma Fishman, Food styling by Susie Theodorou, Prop styling by Sophie LengInstead of trying to re-create the ext
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Photo by Joe Baur “He don’t eat no meat? What do you mean he don’t eat no meat!?” It’s a line from My Big Fat Greek Wedding that brings the engagement party to a halt. Horrified faces turn to the xénos (foreigner), Ian Miller. Aunt Voula looks at her niece, the bride-to-be Toula Portokalos, as if to telepathically chastise her: “How can you, a Greek, marry a vegetarian?” Then, the solution comes to Aunt Vou
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A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt,
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Photo by James Ransom Thanksgiving is less than six weeks away, but there’s already cause for concern over this year’s turkey supply. Butterball has issued a recall of more than 14,000 pounds of ground turkey product because it is suspected to be contaminated with blue plastic. According to Butterball, the ground turkey was distributed to Kroger and BJ’s grocery stores. No other Butterball turkey products are affected by this recall and the brand is cooperating with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to complete a thorough investigation to confirm the safety of the rest of their products. According to the USDA, the affected ground turkey products include 2.5-lb. trays containing “farm to family Butterball all-natural Ground Turkey'' with the case code 50211271, a sell or freeze by date of 10/18/2021, and timestamps from 2123 through 2302 printed on the packaging; and a three-pound tray containing “Kroger Ground Turkey'' with the case code 50211271, a sell or freeze by date of 10/17/2021, and timestamps from 2314 through 2351 printed on the packaging. The contaminated product was discovered and reported by a consumer who found blue plastic mixed in with the turkey. However, at this time there are no reported injuries or illnesses associated with the recalled products. Unfortunately, cooking the turkey to 165℉ will not take care of the issue. If you have one of these products in your refrigerator or freezer, you are urged to immediately discard the turkey or return it to the place of purchase for a refund. Consumers with questions about the recall can contact the Butterball Consumer Hotline at (800) 288-8372.
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Mexican adobo can also be found in the form of canned chipotle peppers in adobo sauce from brands like La Costeña. The peppers and sauce add instant smoky flavor and heat to anything you add them to without the whole process of making adobo from scratch.What is Puerto Rican adobo?The colonization of Puerto Rico began in the early 1500s, bringing many of the same Spanish influences to the island. As is the case in Mexico, adobo in Puerto Rico most traditionally refers to a wet marinade consisting of garlic, some kind of acid (vinegar or citrus), oregano, salt, pepper, and olive oil.The ratio of ingredients depends on what meat is in play, says Von Diaz, a journalist, professor, and author of the cookbook Coconuts & Collards. A dense protein destined for slow-cooking, like pork shoulder, can handle an adobo with more garlic and stronger acid like vinegar or naranja agria (bitter orange), Diaz explains, whereas a delicate fish requires a sauce with less garlic, less salt, and citrus instead of vinegar.Not only does adobo preserve, but it also helps infuse flavor into the tougher cuts of meat once common on the historically under-resourced island. Just as some cooks might think of salt and pepper as nonnegotiables, “I would argue that for most Puerto Ricans, we would never prepare
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“When it comes to potatoes, more is more in my family. A few Thanksgivings ago, not one but two potato dishes appeared on our table—no one batted an eye, and it's been that way ever since. Mashed potatoes always RSVP to the party, but this year I'm serving this little Cacio e Pepe Rösti alongside it. I like that you can cut it into elegant wedges—a small slice of civility on a plate otherwise occupied by blobs and scoops. Other pros: The potatoes can be boiled the night before, and all of the cooking takes place on the stovetop, meaning you're not competing for coveted oven space.” —Christina Chaey, senior food editorAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients6 - 8 Servings3lb. russet potatoes (about 12 medium), peeled1½tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt, plus more2oz. Parmesan, finely grated, plus more for serving2tsp. freshly ground black pepper, plus more4Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, dividedPreparationStep 1Place potatoes in a large pot and pour in water to cover by 2"; season generously with salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat and simmer gently until potatoes are tender on the outside but still very firm in the center, 10–12 minutes. Drain potatoes; transfer to a rimmed baking sheet and chill until cool, at least 1 hour. (Fully cooling the potatoes prevents them from getting gummy.)Step 2Grate potatoes on the large holes of a box grater or with a food processor fitted with the grater attachment. (Alternatively, you can use a mandoline fitted with a julienne slicer to create ₁⁄₁₆" matchsticks.) Transfer grated potatoes to a large bowl and toss with 2 oz. grated Parmesan, 1½ tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt, and 2 tsp. pepper.Step 3Heat 3 Tbsp. oil in a medium nonstick or cast-iron skillet over medium. Add potato mixture and, using a heatproof rubber spatula, spread out in an even layer, pressing down on to ensure potatoes make good contact with pan. Cook, occasionally pressing down on potatoes and running spatula around edges and bottom
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Watching kids tear into a wrapped gift is always fun (the colors! the happy characters!) But shopping for the perfect gift? Not quite. The amount of gendered toys out there (we’re looking at you Barbie and G.I. Joe) makes it tricky to shop for kids without setting them up for a lifetime of gendered thinking. In fact, according to an NPR report on kids’ toys, toys are more gender-divided now than they were half a century ago. But the good news is that many companies are starting to rethink things. Take LEGO, which recently announced it is (finally!) getting rid of very gendered kits in favor of ones that appeal to all kids. And they’re not the only ones. Ahead, you’ll find 34 gender-neutral toys that kids of all backgrounds and ages will love. Photo by Simons 1. Ouistitine Chicken And Pig Puppet Duo, $55 Pretty but not aggressively feminine, Ouisitine’s gorgeous, one-of-a-kind hand puppets are handcrafted from upcycled wool sweaters and blankets. Photo by Amazon 2. Lamaze Clip on Toy - Captain Calamari, $15.99 Babies love the bright colors and sensory details of Lamaze’s gender-neutral clip-and-go stroller toys. Photo by Amazon 3. Haba Discovery Blocks, $29.99 These Haba Discovery Blocks are the perfect distraction for a baby, and they’re small enough to tote to a restaurant or on a plane, too. Photo by West Elm 4. West Elm Poppyseed Play Wood Baby Gym, $90 Here’s a baby gym that doesn’t have a whiff of gendering (or plastic!) in its design.
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This is Highly Recommend, a column dedicated to what people in the food industry are obsessed with eating, drinking, and buying right now.Growing up, whenever I begged for candy, my grandmother would offer me a wrapped preserved plum from the stash in her purse instead. Or if we were at her house, she’d retrieve one of the dried varieties from the plastic pouches cinched tight with rubber bands that lined her pantry shelves. I loved them so much that I’d almost forget about the chocolate I’d been craving.Sour and salty and sometimes sweet, preserved plums pack a wallop of pucker-inducing flavor. The most basic iterations contain just salt and sugar, while other varieties are marinated with top-notes of licorice, cloves, and citrus. They come in two forms: The drier, saltier, and much
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Freezer-aisle fries like you’ve never had before! Tossed in a sticky, spicy honey glaze, these are the perfect exemplar of that very specific and beloved texture: crispy-gone-soggy. This recipe is based on a similar dish that often appears in many Indian Chinese restaurants known as honey chili potatoes. Use crinkle-cut fries, waffle fries, tater tots, or even fries from your favorite take-out place if you’d like. Just make sure to warm the fries through in the oven before tossing them in the sauce. If you want to retain some virtuousness, serve these with steamed white rice and steamed green vegetables such as broccoli, Chinese broccoli, or bok choy. —Shilpa UskokovicAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something thro
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Bacon-y. Michael Graydon & Nikole HerriottWhat are the best Dutch ovens money can buy? Down to business. I have a Lodge, which I love, but there are plenty of great options out there at a variety of price points. You do absolutely need one, so choose the one that fits your budget. The best cast-iron Dutch oven doesn’t have to cost $350—but it sure can if you want it to. Here are our recommendations:Into the idea of owning a piece of cookware that’ll last for generations to come? Le Creuset’s iconic Dutch (French?) ovens are genuine heirloom pieces. I’ve had mine for 10 years, my mom has had hers for 40, and I know folks using Le Creusets that have been passed down from grandparents. They’re more lightweight than competitors—which is key if you’re in the market for a 13.25 quart Dutch oven to make enough soup for your soccer team—and come with that Le Creuset lifetime warranty (most of the others mentioned here do too, but Le Creuset’s is famously generous). We use them in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen. The downside is, of course, the price—which is partly due to the high quality and partly due to the fact that these things are still made in France, where the
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All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.These mushroom tacos are “the most requested dish at family gatherings and potlucks with friends,” writes Edgar Castrejón in his book, Provecho: 100 Vegan Mexican Recipes to Celebrate Culture and Community, all about vegan Mexican and Latin American cooking. While Castrejón recommends chanterelle mushrooms for their “chewy texture that satisfies, like a meat filling,” almost any combination of mushrooms, torn or cut into bite-size pieces, works well in this recipe. Toss the mushrooms energetically to ensure the spice mix gets into all the nooks and crannies. As good as the seasoned mushrooms are, the tacos really come alive with the toppings so don’t sleep on those.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4 servings1lb. mixed mushrooms (such as chanterelle, oyster and/or crimini), coarsely chopped2Tbsp. avocado oil or vegetable oil2Tbsp. fresh lime juice1Tbsp. dried oregano1Tbsp. onion powder2tsp. garlic powder2tsp. ground cumin2tsp. coconut sugar or organic cane sugar2tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1¼ tsp. Morton kosher salt½tsp. cayenne pepperWarm small corn tortillas, salsa, store-bought vegan sour cream (optional), sliced radishes, halved cherry tomatoes, chopped cilantro, and lime wedges (for serving)PreparationStep 1Place a rack in middle of oven; preheat to 400°. Toss mushrooms, oil, lime juice, oregano, onion powder, garlic powder, cumin,
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It’s that time of year again! You know, the one where we lop the heads off of unsuspecting gourds, to then scoop out their guts and chisel evil patterns into their flesh. Spooky, right? But where does this rather odd tradition come from? Well, let’s start with Halloween itself, first. You’ll likely be unsurprised to learn that Halloween, like many American holidays, was once a religious observance that became secular over the years (about a thousand years, actually). Halloween can be traced back to the Celtic festival of Samhain, which was celebrated on November 1st. On the day of Samhain, people believed that the souls of the dead returned to their homes, so they’d dress in costumes and light fires to ward off evil spirits. Later, in the 8th century, Pope Gregory III moved All Saints Day to November 1st (likely as a Chrisitan substitute for the pagan holiday), and the day before became known as “All Hallows Eve,” or, Halloween of course. The holiday spread from Ireland and the UK to France and even the new American colonies, picking up practices and traditions along the way. One of these came from the Irish and Scottish custom of “guising,” in which a person dressed in a costume would do some kind of trick in exchange for a treat… we bet you can guess what the modern version is. Another custom added to the mix? Carving pumpkins, of course. The fi
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Recipe developer and fashion designer Peter Som didn’t grow up with spicy food. Cantonese dishes don’t have the heat of Sichuan or Hunan cooking, and it was only many years later, after he moved to New York, that Som came to appreciate the wide range of Asian cuisines that balance heat and sweet. The combination of Korean gochujang, maple syrup, and brown butter creates that ideal union in this side dish, a staple at his Thanksgiving table. If you can’t find gochujang (he likes the one from ingre brand), Som suggests using 2–3 Tbsp. Sriracha instead.For the rest of Som’s Thanksgiving
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Milk tea is a delicious result of Hong Kong’s melting pot history. Chinese tea drinking rarely involves dairy, but the British influence in Hong Kong created what recipe developer and fashion designer Peter Som describes as a magical elixir made by combining strong black tea and sweetened condensed milk. Sweet, bitter, creamy, and so, so good, milk tea is very drinkable on its own and is an irresistible base for this bread pudding. Melted and warmed vanilla ice cream makes for a lightning-fast, no-stress crème anglaise.For the rest of Som’s Thanksgiving menu, see his recipes for Asian Pe
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“I vividly remember the time a visiting Southerner brought a dish of corn pudding to our Thanksgiving dinner. I was young, skeptical of additions to the holiday buffet, but became an enthusiastic convert: Dairy-rich and custardy, flecked with sweet corn, it felt like some kind of Turkey Day missing link. In this version the eggy pudding stays classic while other elements gesture southwest, with hominy adding chew, peppers offering warmth, and funky, crumbly Cotija turning the savoriness up to 11.” —Amiel Stanek, contributing editorAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently s
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“Upside-down cakes are such a joy to bake,” writes Cheryl Day in her newest book, Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking. “It’s the surprise when you unmold the cake that makes them so satisfying.” For an instant upgrade to this retro classic, ditch the typical fire-engine-red maraschinos for sophisticated, fruity Luxardo cherries. Flip the cake while it’s still warm—but not hot!—for easy removal.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients12 ServingsCaramel topping1cup (packed; 200 g) light brown sugar6Tbsp. unsalted butter1Tbsp. vanilla extract1tsp. Diamond Crystal or ½ tsp. Morton kosher salt115-oz. can pineapple slices, dra
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“If tart-sweet cranberry sauce is a Thanksgiving staple, why not use it to dress a bright, vibrant salad? In this recipe endives and frisée are topped with a chunky, tangy dressing made from canned whole-cranberry sauce—a bracing foil to earthy bitter greens. Sprinkled with crunchy candied pecans and salty shavings of Manchego cheese, this fresh and lively side is the dream complement to what can otherwise be a rather heavy spread.” —Jessie YuChen, assistant food editorAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients6 Servings3Tbsp. raw sugar2Tbsp. pure maple syrup½tsp. Diamond Crystal or ¼ tsp. Morton kosher salt, plus more1cup coarsely cho
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No mai fan (also spelled “lo mai fan”) is a Cantonese dish of steamed glutinous rice studded with lap cheong (Chinese sausage), mushrooms, and other savory bits. For Chinese-American recipe developer and fashion designer Peter Som, it was a childhood favorite that has since become a staple on his Thanksgiving table. In place of the traditional clay pot, or “sand pot,” Som’s version uses a Dutch oven, which is ideal for keeping the rice warm until you’re ready to serve it. If you can’t find glutinous rice, also known as sweet rice or sticky rice, use all jasmine rice and add a few extra tablespoons of broth for a slightly stickier consistency. After cooking, let the rice sit, covered, for 10–15 minutes. (Using only jasmine will be a fair approximation, but it’s well worth
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Cacciatore (meaning “hunter-style”) is an Italian wine-and-tomato-based braise traditionally prepared with whatever game was caught that day. This version from Heirloom Kitchen author Anna Francese Gass uses bone-in pork chops that are cooked quickly to keep them juicy, paired with a tangy-sweet cacciatore-inspired sauce. Serve with a loaf of crusty bread to sop up all the tomato-y goodness.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients2 - 4 Servings25–6-oz. bone-in pork rib chops1½tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt, plus moreFreshly ground black pepper1tsp. dried oregano2Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided1red bell pepper, ri
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This is All on the Table, a column featuring writers we love sharing stories of food, conflict, and community.Around a hundred years ago, my grandparents’ house in Galveston Island, Texas, was moved from the interior of the island to the beachside. The island had been wiped out by the historic 1900 storm, a hurricane that killed thousands and flattened the landscape. One of my mom’s favorite bedtime stories was telling us about the nuns at an orphanage who tied the kids together to keep track of them in the storm—only to have them drown because of it. Every time she told the story the number of orphans grew. So this is the place, and the people, I come from.We’ve scattered the ashes of so many family members in the Gulf that now I can’t swim in those brown salty waters without t
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The idea of making a baked Alaska may seem daunting, but these petite desserts from Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking can be broken down into easy-to-make components that can all be made ahead of time. Feel free to use any flavor of ice cream for the center. We prefer to use a kitchen torch to brown the meringue, but in a pinch, you could brown the baked Alaskas under a broiler—just watch them very carefully and rotate often.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients6 ServingsCakeUnsalted butter or nonstick vegetable oil spray (for pan)1¾cups (219 g) all-purpose flour, plus more for pan2large eggs, room temperature1large egg yolk, roo
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The classic Provençal tian—a gratin of layered sliced vegetables served right from the vessel it’s baked in—gets a Chinese-American twist, courtesy of recipe developer and fashion designer Peter Som. In this recipe, a favorite on his Thanksgiving table, Som uses thinly sliced rounds of sweet potato tossed in brown butter spiked with ginger, miso, dark soy sauce, and five-spice powder. “Made of fennel seeds, cinnamon, cloves, star anise, and Sichuan peppercorns, five-spice is infinitely versatile,” he says. “It brings warmth to whatever I’m making. I like to say it’s pumpkin spice’s bolder cousin.” Stacking the slices so they stand upright on their sides (rather than flat against the pan) exposes their edges to the heat of the oven, allowing them to become crispy and in
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“Too many people say too many things, and I wish they’d stop,” says actor Stanley Tucci about the origins of the martini. “The only thing that matters is that the martini exists.” Here, Tucci shares his recipe for his ideal martini, the way he’s been drinking it for ages: gin or vodka (each has its time and place) with just a whiff of vermouth, stirred not shaken. It’s “the quintessence of elegance that we all aspire to and believe we acquire when we drink one.”All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.IngredientsMakes 1½oz. dry vermouth2–3oz. high-quality gin or vodkaLemon twist or olives (for serving)PreparationStep 1Fill a glass beak
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Bored with lackluster beans? Associate food editor Kendra Vaculin has a citrusy solution to your legume doom with a lemony dressing, combining zest-infused oil and bright juice, that pulls double duty as a marinade for canned beans and as a dressing for the salad itself. Marinate any white bean (like cannellini, navy, or Great Northern), then toss them with pleasantly bitter radicchio, thinly sliced raw brussels sprouts, and big chunks of salty feta.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4 Servings1lemon4garlic cloves, smashed¼tsp. crushed red pepper flakes½cup extra-virgin olive oil215.5-oz. cans white beans, rinsed1½tsp. Diamond Crystal o
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This dressing checks all the boxes: It’s nutty, salty, savory, and just sweet enough, with a hefty texture that holds its own against sturdy kale. Make it ahead of time and dress your salad before you put the finishing touches on your Thanksgiving meal; the salad should sit for a few minutes before serving to ensure the kale is tender. If you don’t have a food processor, you can chop your ingredients by hand—the finished dressing won’t be as creamy, but it will still taste great.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients8 Servings1½cups pecans2garlic cloves, finely grated½cup extra-virgin olive oil2Tbsp. drained capers1Tbsp. honey⅓cup
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All the herby and aromatic flavors of a classic Thanksgiving stuffing—sage, rosemary, fennel seed, onion-y scallion–are packed into this tender biscuit. Stacking pieces of dough before rolling out ensures plenty of tall, buttery layers. If you have any extra biscuits after The Big Meal, store them in an airtight container at room temperature overnight and prepare to have the most festive biscuits and gravy (featuring leftover Thanksgiving gravy, of course!) for breakfast the next morning.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.IngredientsMakes 121Tbsp. Diamond Crystal kosher or 1¾ tsp. Morton kosher salt1Tbsp. baking soda¼tsp. baking powder1tsp. sug
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In this no-fuss sauce, tart cranberries meet their match in bright ginger and fruity golden raisins. But this cranberry relish isn’t only meant for the Thanksgiving table: Try it as part of a festive breakfast on pancakes or French toast, as a holiday cheeseboard condiment, or as a sweet spread on grilled cheese sandwiches (it’s great with brie!).All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients1lb. fresh (or frozen, thawed) cranberries12" piece ginger, peeled, finely grated1¼cups golden raisins (about 8 oz.)¾cup sugar3Tbsp. fresh orange juice2Tbsp. unsalted butter½tsp. ground allspiceKosher saltPreparationStep 1Cook cranberries, ginger, raisins,
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Modern furikakes come in a variety of combinations. While the classic gomashio, shiso, and katsuobushi still stand, you’ll also find furikakes with newer additions like dehydrated egg, wasabi, nori, sardines, cod roe, umeboshi, meat, yuzu, curry powder, and other spices. And thanks to industrial dehydrators, they’re also drier, crispier, and longer-lasting than those homemade versions I grew up with.How can I use furikake?Furikake is versatile and doesn’t need to be saved for special meals or even reserved for Japanese dishes—it can become a daily seasoning like salt or pepper if you wish. I’ve found blends that not only give my rice a punch of flavor but also jazz up my pasta, noodles, vegetables, pizza, popcorn, dips, and—in my latest experiment—focaccia. Crème fraîche and furikake is an untraditional but delicious combination. Photo by Alex Lau, Food Styling by Susie Theodorou, Prop Styling by Aneta Florczyk To use it well, avoid over sprinkling—like salt, it's salty!—and pair it with foods that are fairly mellow in flavor: Scatter it on scrambled eggs, steamed or roasted fish, or fried rice; use it to add texture and oomph to a split steamed sweet potato, chicken salad, crudités; distribute it over crackers and cookies as a finishing touch right before baking. Or follow the lead of Kristina Cho and make furikake, along with scallions, mayonnaise, and pork floss, the filling for savory swirl buns.Yes, adding furikake to a Western dish can blur its authenticity, but if it tastes good, why not?Where can I buy furikake (and how can I find the good stuff)?On the West Coast, where I live, I’ve found delicious furikakes made from locally harvested se
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Photo by Ty Mecham The deepest breaths I take are not in barre class or during a cliffhanger episode of This Is Us. No, it’s when I place my checked bag on the scale at TSA, waiting to see if my suitcase is over or under 50 pounds. I always come close. I mean, don’t you also pack eight pairs of shoes, five books, two laptops, a sun hat, multiple pairs of sweatpants, and ankle weights for a three-day beach vacation? Well, leave it to TikTok to come up with a genius way to stash all of your excess belongings without the fear of a last-minute overweight suitcase. The secret? A pillowcase. TikTok user @nolimitua, whose name is Anya Iakovlieva, shared a video showing her stuffing a pillowcase with clothes to provide added cushioning. Not only does this become a cozy travel companion, but it’s also a sneaky way to bring extra clothes and accessories without stuffing a suitcase to the brim or checking a bag. And it shouldn’t count as your carry-on or personal item either. “The best travel hack ever!!! 'Pillow' flies for free," she wrote on the post, which has garnered more than 17 million views since it was posted on September 18th, 2021. Iakovlieva confirmed that the hack works—in fact, she’s done this seven times while traveling. Of course, TikTok users couldn’t love the hack more. One commenter recommended putting the clothi
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Red lentils, or masoor dal, are a weeknight dinner superstar: They’re inexpensive, quick-cooking, and endlessly versatile. “I often cook a lot of masoor dal over the weekend to quickly flavor during the week for last-minute meals,” says cookbook author and Brooklyn Delhi founder Chitra Agrawal. “This dal palak packed with spinach is one of my go-to ways to use it.” If you’re strapped for time, Agrawal suggests throwing in baby spinach straight from the package rather than washing and chopping mature spinach leaves. For an extra savory note, add a big pinch of asafetida to the melted ghee when you add the seeds.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4 Servings1cup masoor dal (red lentils)¼tsp. ground turmeric1lime, halved, divided1½tsp. Diamond Crystal or ¾ tsp. Morton kosher salt, divided, plus more2Tbsp. ghee or unsalted butter½tsp. black mustard seeds½tsp. cumin seeds½tsp. fennel seed1small dried red chile, broken in half1small onion, coarsely chopped2garlic cloves, finely chopped1tsp. finely grated peeled ginger3cups spinach, coarsely choppedSteamed rice, cilantro leaves, and lime wedges (for serving)PreparationStep 1Rinse dal in a fine-mesh sieve. Transfer to a medium saucepan and pour in 3 cups water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. (Watch carefully as the water can boil over quickly.) Cook, skimming foam from surface, until mixture stops foaming, about 3 minutes. Stir in turmeric. Reduce heat to medium-low, partially cover, and simmer until tender, 25–30 minutes. Remove from heat and squeeze in juice from a lime half, then stir in 1 tsp. Diamond Crystal or ½ tsp. Morton kosher salt.Step 2Meanwhile, melt ghee in a high-sided skillet over medium-high heat. Add mustard, cumin, and fennel seeds and cook (a matter of seconds) until mustard seeds start to pop and oil around other seeds is sizzling. Reduce heat to medium. Add chile and stir to coat. Add onion and cook, stirring occasionally to coat, until translucent and softened, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and ginger and cook, stirring,
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Photo by James Ransom We want to see your best dish made with love! Enter our latest recipe contest with your submission—you have until November 15! As we approach the holiday season, many of us tend to think about visiting (and eating!) with family and friends. Although some of us spend an inordinate amount of time trying to craft that perfect turkey dinner menu with all the myriad trimmings, this is also the perfect time of year to show your friends and family that you care through sharing perhaps less fussy, but equally special foods—ones that are made with love. Submissions are open from now until November 15 at 6 p.m. ET. Here are a just a few rules: We are looking for main courses (sorry, no appetizers or desserts) but feel free to dress up your main with some accoutrements. Your dish should be easily transportable, prepped, and served by the recipient of your loving meal. We want you to tell us all about how your dish was made with love in the recipe headnote.
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“A couple of spoonfuls of miso adds a little extra umami and saltiness to these spuds, a subtle bridge between the roasted garlic and dairy that nobody will quite be able to put their finger on. And yes: These potatoes are actually mashed. I’m not going to stop you from pulling out a ricer or food mill if supersmooth is your thing, but I personally like a bit of texture—a few bits of intact potato remind you that you’re actually eating, you know, potatoes.” —Brad Leone, video hostAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients8 Servings2heads of garlic1Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oilKosher salt1cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature2Tbsp. white or yellow misoFreshly ground black pepper4lb. medium Yukon Gold potatoes1½cups heavy creamPreparationStep 1Preheat oven to 350°. Cut ½" off top of each head of garlic to expose just the tops of the cloves inside. Place on a 12"-square piece of parchment paper or foil. Drizzle with oil and season with salt. Drizzle 1 tsp. water over.Step 2Bring edges of parchment up and over garlic and fold together to make a packet and seal. Place on a small rimmed baking sheet and bake until very tender, 60–75 minutes.Step 3Let garlic sit until cool enough to handle, then squeeze out cloves into a medium bowl. Add butter and mash together into a paste with a wooden spoon or stiff rubber spatula. Add miso and mix well. Season garlic-miso butter with salt and pepper; set aside.Step 4Peel and quarter potatoes. Place in a large pot and pour in water to cover by 1"; season generously with salt. Bring water to a boil over medium-high, then reduce heat and simmer gently, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are very tender (a tester or paring knife should easily slide into flesh), about 20 minutes from the time water starts to simmer. Drain potatoes and let sit 5 minutes to dry out; reserve pot.Step 5Bring cream to a simmer in reserved pot over medium-high. Remove from heat and return potatoes to pot. Set aside about 3 Tbsp. garlic-miso butter for serving and add remaining garlic-m
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These luxurious enchiladas, served at the Original Mexican Cafe in Galveston, Texas, are a timeworn staple for senior staff writer Alex Beggs. “Mole can get too chocolatey if the cook is heavy-handed,” she says, “but here, it’s in perfect balance with smoky ancho chiles.” Read Beggs’ essay about what these enchiladas mean to her, then try your hand at making them yourself. The Original’s streamlined approach to making mole cuts down on ingredients without sacrificing flavor for a rich, velvety sauce that’s layered under crispy-gooey cheese.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients6 ServingsFilling1½lb. skinless, boneless chicken thighs (4–5)1small onion, halved1celery stalk1Tbsp. Diamond Crystal or 1¾ tsp. Morton kosher saltMole and assembly4large dried ancho chiles, stems and seeds removed⅓cup golden raisins¼cup mole paste (preferably Rogelio Bueno)1Tbsp. chicken bouillon paste2tsp. creamy peanut butter1tsp. sugar2Tbsp. plus ¼ cup vegetable oil¼cup chopped semisweet chocolateKosher salt8oz. Monterey Jack, coarsely grated (about 2 cups), divided125"–6" corn tortillas¼cup coarsely chopped cilantroFinely chopped onion, cooked rice, refried beans, and lime wedges (for serving)PreparationFillingStep 1Bring chicken thighs, onion, celery, salt, and 5 cups water to a boil in a large pot. Reduce heat and simmer very gently until chicken is cooked through, 12–15 minutes from the time water starts simmering.Step 2Transfer chicken to a medium bowl; let cool. Strain broth through a fine-mesh sieve into a large measuring cup (you should have 4½ cups); discard solids.Mole and assemblyStep 3Toast chiles in a dry small skillet over medium-low heat until pliable and slightly puffed with a few lighter-colored blisters, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a blender, add raisins and 2 cups broth, and tamp down chiles to submerge. Let sit until softened, about 20 minutes.Step 4Add mole paste, bouillon paste, peanut butter, and sugar to blender and purée until smooth.Step 5Heat 2 Tbsp. oil in a clean large pot over
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1lb. shrimp, peeled, deveined, tails removed, patted dry1tsp. Diamond Crystal or ½ tsp. Morton kosher salt, plus more12oz. orecchiette or other short pasta3oz. log salami, preferably fennel, thinly sliced into rounds½cup (1 stick) unsalted butterZest and juice of 1 lemon6garlic cloves, finely chopped1tsp. crushed red pepper flakes1tsp. fennel seeds, lightly crushed1small fennel bulb, tough outer layers removed, finely chopped1cup dry white wine1tsp. smoked paprika½cup coarsely chopped parsley
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“I personally gravitate toward a holiday stuffing with a more classic flavor profile, but I’m also a firm believer that a little bit of spice improves most things. That’s why I incorporated meaty bits of spicy-tangy Mexican-style chorizo and a handful of fiery Calabrian chiles into this stuffing recipe. The heat these ingredients bring is fairly subtle, just enough to activate your taste buds in between bites of roast turkey and rich green bean casserole, and keeps you coming back for more.” —Rachel Gurjar, associate food editorAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently
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The conundrum is as old as Thanksgiving itself: You want to make a green bean casserole, but there’s absolutely no space in the oven to bake one off on the big day. This buttery stir-fry features all the earthy mushrooms and crispy shallots you’d expect from the classic dish, but is done entirely on the stovetop. For less to do on Thanksgiving day, blanch your green beans the day before and store them in the fridge until you’re ready to go.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients8 Servings1½lb. green beans, trimmed1½tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt, plus more⅓cup vegetable oil3large shallots, thinly sliced1lb. mushrooms (such as oyster, shiitake, or maitake), tough stems removed, torn into large pieces4Tbsp. unsalted butter2Tbsp. sherry vinegar or red wine vinegarFreshly ground black pepper2oz. Parmesan, finely gratedPreparationStep 1Cook green beans in a medium pot of boiling salted water until bright green, about 2 minutes. Drain and rinse green beans under cold water to stop them from cooking more. Set aside.Step 2Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Cook shallots, stirring occasionally, until browned, frizzled, and crisp, 6–8 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain, and immediately season with salt. Set aside for serving.Step 3Add mushrooms to same skillet and toss to coat with oil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 4 minutes. Season with salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until starting to brown, about 4 minutes. Reduce heat to medium and add butter, reserved green beans, and 1½ tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt. Cook, tossing often and spooning foaming butter over vegetables, until butter darkens slightly and smells nutty, about 5 minutes. Add vinegar and season generously with pepper. Cook, stirring often, 1 minute.Step 4Transfer green beans and mushrooms to a platter and spoon any sauce in pan over. Top with Parmesan and reserved crispy shallots.Do ahead: Green beans can be blanched 1 day ahead. Pat dry; transfer to an airtight container or resealable bag and chill.How would you rate Green Beans and Mushrooms With Crispy Shallots?
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Flipping through Kristina Cho’s incredible new cookbook Mooncakes and Milk Bread: Sweet and Savory Recipes Inspired by Chinese Bakeries, it felt impossible to pick the recipe I wanted to make first. I quickly found my kindred treats in chapter three—“Pork Buns and Beyond”—which is filled with both iconic and new-school savory snacks like char siu bao filled with crimson barbecued pork, a jaw-dropping deep-dish pepperoni bread, and beautiful hot dog flower buns that are as miraculous to gaze upon as they are to pull apart, one “petal” at a time . Savory buns are my favorite Chinese bakery delicacy, so I was delighted to find an entire chapter featuring twists on nostalgic favorites.But it was the Pork Floss and Seaweed Pull-Apart Rolls that I and everyone I baked them for could not stop raving about. We had seconds and thirds, fought over the squidgiest (and arguably best) bun in the center of the pan, and ate all the leftover pork floss straight from the container.The bun itself is made from Cho’s master milk bread recipe, which she incorporates into all kinds of recipes throughout the book. It’s bouncy and light and employs tangzhong, a quick roux of milk and flour that gets mixed into the yeasted dough, which keeps the resulting bread super moist. Once you roll out the dough into a rectangle, you spread on a layer of sweet Kewpie mayonnaise, top with a generous sprinkling of seaweed-savory furikake, and finish it all off with a thick layer of pork floss before the dough gets rolled up and sliced into buns (think savory cinnamon rolls). Once baked, these tall and fluffy buns have a touch of sweetness from the mayo, savoriness from the furikake, and a pu
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The undisputed worst part of roasting squash is laboriously hacking apart a rock-hard gourd. Skip that entire process by roasting a kabocha squash whole, then tearing the cooked flesh into pieces to roast again under a fragrant and slightly spicy glaze. The result is tender squash with a sticky-sweet sheen in boats of crispy skin. If you want to work ahead, roast the whole squash a day before you need it and store it in your refrigerator; before serving, simply tear the squash, drizzle it with glaze, and pop it back into the oven for the final roast.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients8 Servings22½–3½-lb. kabocha squash2–3Fresno chiles, thinly sliced½cup pure maple syrup1Tbsp. vanilla extractKosher salt⅓cup extra-virgin olive oil3Tbsp. toasted sesame seedsPreparationStep 1Preheat oven to 425°. Poke each squash a few times with a sharp knife, then place on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Roast until a fork easily pierces through skin, about 1 hour. Let sit until cool enough to handle, then cut each squash in half. Scoop out and discard seeds. Tear squash into large pieces and arrange, flesh side up, on same baking sheet.Step 2Increase oven temperature to 450°. Bring chiles, maple syrup, vanilla, and a big pinch of salt to a boil in a small saucepan; reduce heat and simmer until thickened, 8–10 minutes. Remove fro
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Stop hunting for that roasting pan you never use! This Thanksgiving turkey with a simple gravy made from the drippings requires nothing more than a trusty rimmed baking sheet and a wire rack that fits inside. Give the bird plenty of time to dry brine in the refrigerator—at least 24 hours and up to 2 days—for maximum flavor. Once you get roasting, a 12–14 lb. turkey will only need about 2 hours (plus 30 minutes of resting time) to turn golden brown and perfectly moist.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients8 - 10 Servings112–14-lb. turkey⅓cup Diamond Crystal or ¼ cup Morton kosher salt¼cup (packed) light brown sugar1Tbsp. smoked paprika1cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, divided3cups turkey stock or low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth⅔cup all-purpose flour1Tbsp. Worcestershire sauceFreshly ground black pepperAssorted herb sprigs (for serving; optional)PreparationStep 1Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and set a wire rack inside. Pat turkey dry with paper towels and place, breast side up, on rack.Step 2Mix salt, brown sugar, and paprika in a medium bowl to combine. Pat dry brine all over sides and in cavity of turkey, working into any crevices. Chill turkey, uncovered, at least 24 hours and up to 2 days.Step 3When you are ready to roast turkey, preheat oven to 400°. Arrange turkey, breast side up, on a wire rack set inside a rimmed baking sheet (if using the same baking sheet, throw away foil and rinse pan to remove any accumulated salty liquid). Pour ¾ cup water into baking sheet (this will keep the drippings from burning). Roast, rotating baking sheet halfway through, until golden brown, 35–45 minutes.Step 4Meanwhile, melt ½ cup butter in a small saucepan over medium.Step 5Remove turkey from oven and brush or spoon half of the butter over turkey. Pour an additional ⅓ cup water into baking sheet.Step 6Reduce oven temperature to 300°. Return turkey to oven (if any spots are overly dark, like the wing tips, cover with small pieces of foil) and roast, rotating baking sheet and brushing turkey with remaining melted butter halfway through, until well browned and an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast registers 155° (temperature will continue to rise as the turkey rests), 70–80 minutes. Let rest on baking sheet at least 30 minutes.Step 7Lift and tilt turkey so that all the drippings from the bird and inside the cavity run onto the baking sheet, and transfer turkey to a cutting board. Pour drippings into a large measuring glass, scraping in browned bits stuck to baking sheet with a spatula. Pour in stock as needed to measure 4 cups.Step 8Melt remaining ½ cup butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add flour and cook, whisking constantly, until smooth and light golden brown, about 3 minutes. Gradually pour in drippings mixture, whisking constantly until combined. Reduce heat to low and simmer, whisking often, until gravy is thickened, about 5 minutes. Add Worcestershire sauce and whisk well. Season gravy with salt and lots of pepper.Step
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Fall is officially sweet potato season, and this aromatic cake from Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking is an ideal cozy-weather snack. The outside is completely cloaked in glossy ganache, but when you slice into the cake, it reveals its heart: tender, gently spiced, and faintly citrusy. You can use canned sweet potato purée instead of making your own, but you’ll need to use less of it to make up for the additional moisture.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients12 ServingsCake1lb. sweet potatoes (2–3 medium), peeled, cut into 1" pieces, or 1 cup (250 g) canned sweet potato puréeUnsalted butter or nonstick vegetable oil spray (for pan)2½cups (313 g) all-purpose flour1Tbsp. Diamond Crystal or 1¾ tsp. Morton kosher salt1tsp. baking powder½tsp. baking soda2tsp. ground cinnamon½tsp. freshly grated nutmeg¼tsp. ground cloves2large eggs, room temperature1½cups (300 g) granulated sugar2tsp. finely grated orange zest1tsp. vanilla extract1cup vegetable oilGanache and assembly½cup heavy cream4Tbsp. unsalted butter, cut into 1" pieces3Tbsp. granulated sugar2Tbsp. brewed coffee½tsp. Diamond Crystal or ¼ tsp. Morton kosher salt8oz. (227 g) bittersweet chocolate½tsp. vanilla extractPreparationCakeStep 1Place a rack in middle of oven and preheat to 400°. If using raw sweet potatoes, wrap in foil and roast on a parchment-lined baking sheet until tender (a knife should slide easily into flesh), 50–60 minutes.Step 2Unwrap sweet potatoes and let sit until cool enough to handle. Transfer to a small bowl. Using a potato masher or fork, smash until smooth. Measure out 1¼ cups (250 g) purée; save any extra for another use.Step 3Reduce oven temperature to 325°. Butter a 9x5" loaf pan or lightly coat with nonstick spray. Line pan with parchment paper, leaving overhang on long sides. Whisk flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves in a medium bowl.Step 4Whisk mashed sweet potato (homemade or canned), eggs, granulated sugar, zest, and vanilla extract in a large bowl until smooth. Gradually add oil, whisking constantly until completely incorporated. Using a rubber spatula, fold in dry ingredients in 2 batches, mixing just until combined after each addition. Scrape batter into prepared pan and smooth surface with an offset spatula.Step 5Bake cake until golden and a tester inserted into the center comes out clean, 75–90 minutes. Transfer cake to a wire rack and let cool in pan 15 minutes. Using parchment overhang, lift cake out of pan and onto rack. Remove parchment and let cake cool completely.Ganache and assemblyStep 6Bring cream, butter, sugar, coffee, and salt to a simmer in a small saucepan over medium heat. Remove from heat, add chocolate and vanilla, and whisk until chocolate is melted and mixture is smooth. Let cool until thickened slightly, 40–60 minutes.Step 7Pour ganache over cake (it should flow over the sides) and, using a small offset spatula, smooth it evenly over surface. Chill cake until ganache is set, 20–30 minutes. Bring cake to room temperature
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On any given night Shima is the backdrop to a date, an important business meeting, a wedding proposal, a party for the newly divorced, and the like. (Shima’s been my spot for a few of these reasons!) The food here celebrates the delicate, savory flavors of Thailand, Indonesia, and Vietnam and uses local ingredients, which makes it feel very Bahamian. The brunch is popular, but I go for dinner and order all the small plates, which change often. If you see the grilled roti—flaky and charred to perfection—get it.Café MatisseParents never openly admit to having a favorite child, although they surely have a stronger connection with one. That’s how I feel about this old-school Italian spo
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If the joy of frolicking in a field of flowers could be captured in a cookie, it would be Cheryl Day’s lavender-lemon crinkle. These crackly, chewy cookies from her newest book, Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking, balance bright lemon and floral lavender for a tender treat that makes a lovely addition to any cookie platter. Pro tip: Keep the dough as cold as possible for the neatest assembly.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.IngredientsMakes 362cups (250 g) all-purpose flour1Tbsp. finely grated lemon zest1½tsp. baking powder1tsp. Diamond Cr
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On Thursday, October 15, Bon Appétit celebrated the 2021 Heads of the Table with a sleek rooftop cocktail party and dinner at the Press Lounge in New York City. The inaugural list celebrated trailbla
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Photo by Rocky Luten Just like how soccer is life for Dani Rojas in Ted Lasso, cold brew is life for me. It’s what I look forward to every morning when it’s warm outside and the sun is shining, but also when there’s a blizzard and I can’t see my porch through all the snow. It’s my go-to drink for any time, any place—at brunch, a mid-afternoon break, or just running errands on the weekend. My love for cold brew knows no bounds and no seasons. Back when I left my house more regularly, I would grab an iced coffee on the way to work, even if it meant being late to a morning meeting (sorry, folks!). Stopping by the coffee shop was the little breather I needed, sandwiched between a crowded commute and a busy day—a routine that was just for myself. Slowly and sadly, I realized that my routine was more about paying for overpriced coffee-flavored water than getting a good cup. I still enjoyed my morning break, but after too many cups of diluted “coffee,” I knew it was a habit I needed to change. I eventually started making my own cold brew at home. It’s my preferred type of coffee: one that doesn’t get watered down because of how it’s brewed. Instead of using hot water, you steep grounds in cold water and over a long period of time in the fridge—usually overnight. The next morning, you’ve got a smooth, chilled drink that’s ready for milk, creamer, syrup, ice, or nothing at all—which is how I take my coffee. In my search for a cold-brew maker, I needed something affordable, easy to use, and convenient. Things like espresso machines and pour overs didn’t quite fit the bill—the former too expensive (ya girl can dream though) and the latter too slow for my morning routine. Photo by Takeya Enter the Takeya Cold Brew Coffee Maker, a unicorn of a coffee maker that costs less than $25 (and goes on sale often), is easy to use, and makes smooth cold brew with the least amount of effort. If the Takeya came with instructions, I wouldn't have read it because it’s super intuitive to use. You just fill the mesh filter with coarsely ground coffee, secure it to the lid, add water to the pitcher, and then screw on the lid. Give the pitcher a good shake to make sure the grounds are thoroughly steeped, and then pop it into the fridge overnight. It takes less than five minutes, and all of the brewing happens when you’re asleep (or revenge-scrolling through TikTok). I make a fresh batch most nights for a smooth cold brew the next morning, and if I’m feeling ambitious on the weekends, I’ll get a head start and make two for the week ahead so I can snooze a bit longer. The one-quart version has served me well the last three years and the durable BPA-free p
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This floral take on a classic apple pie from Back in the Day Bakery owner Cheryl Day may be new to many, but the use of rose water here is rooted in American history. “Before vanilla extract was widely available, the most popular flavoring in America was rose water,” Day writes in her newest cookbook, Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking. “This recipe brings the lovely taste of rose water back to apple pie.” Plan to mix the filling at least 4 hours ahead so the accumulated juices can be reduced before you assemble and bake the pie. While the pie pictured has a layered top crust t
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This salad from recipe developer and fashion designer Peter Som is all about bringing the crunch factor to the Thanksgiving table. Shaved into thin slices, raw cauliflower provides excellent texture and structure, while crisp Asian pears bring a sweet-tart flavor with lovely floral notes. A bright citrusy dressing clings to every nook and cranny thanks to creamy peanut butter for just-enough thickness. When Som was growing up, Asian pears were a treat usually found in Chinatown (and instantly recognizable by their little foam-mesh protective sweaters) but now are more widely available. If you
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I love a good cookie. But you know what's even better? When said cookie comes in the shape of a bar and takes half the time and effort—no scrambling to transfer hot cookies to a cooling rack, no messy portioning of subsequent batches, no devastating cookie Pangaea. It's a one-and-done, no-fuss crowd-pleaser; the low-maintenance, reliable alternative to its more demanding, self-involved, singular counterparts. A team player at heart, the bar cookie doesn't allow for stragglers, or runts, or misfires. Ultimately, each bar is only as good as its batch. Moreover, bar cookies are fun to bite into—they're soft and gooey, and on occasion surprise us with a pleasing crunch or hidden layer. They're dense and easy to eat, as well as easy to share. Plus, everyone has a favorite: the middles, the two-edged corner, the one-edged side. So I urge you: On your next baking bender, consider the bar. Here are 17 recipes to get you started. 1. Magic Cookie Bars Five-layer bars are a dream. No, they’re magic. Layers of sweetened condensed milk, chocolate chips, nuts, and shredded coconut are a nostalgic combination that I’ll never get tired of. 2. Sugar Cookie Bars Kelly, why would I bake cookie bars when I could just make sugar cookies cut into seasonal shapes for Halloween or Christmas? Let’s ask recipe developer Grant Melton. “Regular sugar cookies are already pretty easy to make, but this version is even simpler. No chilling, rolling, or cutting,” he says. An easier version that’s just as delicious? Good enough for me! 3. Malted Chocolate Chunk Cookie Bars Malted milk powder and two kinds of chocolate (cocoa powder and semisweet chocolate) make this cookie bar taste like an old-fashioned candy bar, in the best way possible. 4. Cranberry Cookie Bars If you’re sick of pies during fall and winter, turn to these festive, seasonally appropriate bars instead. They call for just six ingredients, one of which is leftover cranberry sauce, making it a sweet use of Thanksgiving leftovers. 5. Coconut Dream Bars Two kinds of coconut—coconut flakes and sweetened shredded coconut—are folded into a nutty vanilla custard. The mixture is poured over a layer of pre-baked shortbread dough and then the whole thing is baked again until the filling is set. 6. Nanaimo Bars These classic Canadian cookie bars consist of three distinct and delicious layers: a chocolate and coconut graham cracker crust, a creamy custard filling, and a layer of chocolate ganache on top. 7. Tahini Chocolate Shortbread Bars These festive shortbread cookies combine tahini, dark chocolate, and crumbled marble halva for a buttery, crumbly bar that recipe developer Melissa Clark loves to serve for Hanukkah. 8. Chocolate Caramel Walnut Bars An old-fashioned treat—pecan turtle bars—gets a delicious new addition with the help of a chocolate crumble topping. 9. Cinnamon & Rye Shortbread “My twist on tr
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Now that the leaves are changing and we’re eating apple cider donuts every hour on the hour, it seems hard to remember a time when hard apple cider wasn’t also part of our autumn menu. While the craft beer craze and consumption of spiked seltzers and canned cocktails are at an all-time high, so is hard cider. Cider is naturally gluten-free, so a lot of people are able to consume it, which is a big reason why it has become so popular. Five years ago, you could count on one hand the number of hard ciders available nationwide, and most of them were quite sweet. Now, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of cideries producing warm and spiced, fruity, funky hard ciders for consumption from the Finger Lakes of New York to the Pacific Northwest. If you’ve never tried hard cider before, maybe you’re skeptical. Or maybe you’re excited, but just have no idea where to begin. It’s not nearly as saturated of a market as craft beer is, but there is still plenty to learn and lots of varieties to sip. Behind the Scenes At a very high level, cider-making is a rather uncomplicated process. All you need is two ingredients: apple juice, which are added to a tank or barrel (these could be made from stainless steel, polymer, or even old wine or rum oak barrels). The yeast will convert all of the sugars in the juice to ethanol (aka alcohol) and after about two weeks, the cider is ready. More or less. “The higher the sugar content, the longer it will take to ferment,” explains Brittnay Perlo, Master Cidermaker at Austin Eastciders. Generally, between two to four weeks is a normal fermentation time. After the apples have fermented, the cider may be passed through a micron filter to remove the yeast, which creates a clarified, crisp cider. Most hard ciders are filtered; however, some cideries like Downeast Cider House in Boston, Massachusetts brew unfiltered cider, which contains yeast, resulting in a cloudier product that tastes, well, yeastier. At Austin Eastciders, they produce pure hard apple cider, as well as blended fruit cider. This is the stage when any fruit juices—blood orange juice, pineapple juice, etc.—may be added and blended. Dan Pucci, author of American Cider: A Modern Guide to a Historic Beverage, explains that there are two different ways to brew cider with fruit: co-fermentation and post-fermentation blending. Co-fermentation is when fruits like berries or grapes are fermented with the apples from the beginning, creating a very flavorful, complex cider. He says that co-fermentation is especially popular in California, where wildfires have destroyed many vineyards, leaving a lackluster crop that isn’t ripe for wine-making, but perfect for cider. “That’s very different from when fruit purée is added at the end,” he says. “The flavor of post-fermentation will be less complex than co-fermentation.” Whether or not fruit is added, the final step of cider making calls for carbonating the cider with CO2 to make it effervescent, and then it is either canned or kegged. Ho
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Photo by Julia Gartland Nutmeg is the spice equivalent of a knitted sweater. Fragrant and warm, you’ll find it giving depth to pumpkin pies, apple spice cakes, cheesy gratins, eggnog, butternut squash soup, super-simple glazed ham…the kind of food you want to eat by a fireplace. But don’t let its absence in your spice rack stop you from cooking recipes that call for it. Here are 9 stupendous substitutes. Mace Mace is the outer, webbed layer of a nutmeg seed, which is typically ground separately from nutmeg because of its more assertive, piquant taste. Think of it as nutmeg’s sassy twin. Since most nutmeg recipes always call for a small amount—it is a sharp spice, after all—you are fine substituting it with mace 1:1. Allspice It sounds like a spice blend, but it’s not! Allspice comes from the Pimenta dioica tree, native to the West Indies, which is why you’ll notice it as a key ingredient in Jamaican jerk chicken. It gets its name because English colonists thought it tasted like a blend of cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg. And its sharp woodiness makes it a fine 1:1 substitute for nutmeg. Cloves Both cloves and nutmeg come from trees native to Indonesia and other subtropical climates, which give them a close affinity. Cloves are much more pungent and peppery than nutmeg, however, so you’ll want to use less when substituting. If you’re freshly grinding whole cloves, use 1/4 as much nutmeg; for pre-ground cloves, use half as much. But if a recipe calls for both cloves and nutmeg, don’t double up on the cloves—they are always best when paired with something more mellow to balance its bite. Cinnamon Warmer and more playful than nutmeg, cinnamon can sub in for nutmeg’s woody profile. Its brighter taste means you want to use half as much as your nutmeg-using recipe calls for. If your recipe already has cinnamon, then—unlike cloves—you can double up on it, especially if you love the taste of cinnamon (which, let’s be honest, 99 percent of us do). Spice Mixes: Garam Masala, Chinese Five Spice, or Pumpkin Pie Spice If you have any of these spice mixes on hand, they will save the day when it comes to substituting nutmeg. Garam masala, which translates to "hot spices," varies widely, but as in this recipe from Nik Sharma, you can usually bet on it having nutmeg, cinnamon, and cloves. Since garam masala also tends to have cumin, we suggest only using it for savory dishes as a 1:1 substitute. Chinese five spice, similarly, is a mix that varies greatly, but you can count on cinnamon and star anise making an appearance. It’s a great substitute in savory dishes; for sweet dishes, that’s for you to decide. It is a bit more versatile than garam masala in that the liquorice-y taste is more w
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As a long-time Alaska resident, I’m used to busting out the chunky blankets shortly after Labor Day. The summers are magical but short, and we usually see our first snowfall by early October. But that doesn’t mean that I or my statesmen are ready to retreat inside—especially during a pandemic that’s prevented us from socializing indoors. That’s why I’ve made it my personal mission to find ways to entertain outdoors well into the fall and winter. Whether it’s a gathering in a garden or backyard, on a porch or patio, or maybe even in the driveway, the key is to make the space warm, cozy, and inviting for guests. Here are all the essentials you’ll ne
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All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.These pillowy, savory b
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I am known for throwing overly ambitious dinner parties. Sometimes they work out really well—usually when my guests are smart and bring lots of beer and a hefty salad. Sometimes they do not, and I’m pretty sure everyone ends up going through McDonald’s drive-thru when they leave my house. My problem is that my imagination often outpaces my organization skills, which, I'll be honest, were never really that strong to begin with.  My latke party of fall 2013 (remember Thanksgivukkah!?) wavered somewhere between success and failure. It was a success because I have very nice friends and acquaintances, all of whom were happy pretending that they w
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Believe it or not, the holidays are coming back around. Yes, the holidays! And with them, comes a crash course in how to host again. Like, how much turkey are you supposed to prepare pe
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Big Thanksgiving meals with family and friends means leftovers (as evidenced by examples G, O, B, B, L, and E). But in a season where a lot of us are surrounded by so much, it's important to remember those who aren't as fortunate. In 2020, an estimated 40 million Americans lived in food insecure households. Food insecurity, while a slightly ambiguous term, generally refers to to limited access to adequate amounts of nutritious food due to financial constraints. Photo by Mark Weinberg To help, instead of having a pantry full to the brim with cans of pumpkin well into the summer, consider donating your Thanksgiving leftovers. Here are some suggestions: Try donating leftover Thanksgiving ingredients to your local food pantry. You can find a food pantry near you here. We recommend calling your nearest location ahead of time to inquire if there are items that would be especially welcome, like peanut butter, canned vegetables and soups, boxed macaroni and cheese, whole grain pasta, brown rice, and other shelf-stable ingredients for those who may not have reliable access to refrigerators. Call your local food bank to see what their policies are about donating cooked food—some are happy to receive leftovers the day after they're prepared to ensure the longest possible shelf life, and others will only accept perishables like fresh produce, uncooked proteins, as well as shelf-stable items (see above). Here's where you can find one closest to you, searching by state or zip code. Housing shelters and other non-profit charities may accept food donations. Here's a good non-profit directory. You can also use this interactive map to find shelters and service organizations in your state. Again, it's always a good idea to contact the organization ahead of time to see what their donation policies are, as well as to inquire how you can best help out. Some restaurants donate their leftover food every night at the end o
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Photo by Tim McSweeney For over three years now, the My Family Recipe series has invited writers to share their family’s most treasured dishes, bringing to life the histories, people, and emotions behind them. 87 recipes later, we’re turning its pages to a new chapter: the My Family Recipe podcast. In partnership with food radio station Heritage Radio Network, we're bringing your most-loved family recipes to the airwaves. The Sunday sauce one writer watched his mother make 900 times—but never wrote down. The butterscotch pie recipe a grandma carried with her through the war. And the hearty Polish soup with healing powers. All retold, with some histories expanded, others amplified by your comments, and some cooked live. Of course, with family recipes, it’s never just about the dish (as much as we love recreating this lemon meringue pie). The dishes become symbolic of emotions, like grief and hope as Lisa Ruland explores in her essay on a very special chocolate cake; markers of cultural identity as Jenny Dorsey discovers when she contends wi
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Whether you’re purely a lazy Sunday afternoon reader or make it a priority to squeeze in a few pages between each and every Zoom call, you deserve to have a reading nook in your home that makes your heart sing. Sure, tearing through that mystery novel under the covers or on the sofa can be nice sometimes, but don’t we all dream of a charming little spot that makes curling up with a book feel ultra cozy and zen? Thought so. Well, the good news is that even if you’re relatively short on space (and who isn’t?), it’s more than possible to design a quality reading nook in your apartment with just a few key essentials. We spoke with home experts to gather tips on how you can start carving out a petite, bookworm-friendly spot today. It doesn’t matter where in your home you choose to set up a reading nook—no, really, no space is off limits! “In all of the homes we’ve lived in, creating a small nook for reading has been a priority,” home Instagrammer Debbie Mackenzie says. “You don’t need a fancy spot for a reading nook—I’ve created them in an empty corner of my office, in our bedroom, in our living room, or even in a little closet that wasn’t being used” (Harry Potter vibes, anyone?!). And Mackenzie has realized that carving out a petite spot to unplug for a few moments is critical to her daily routine. “I have found that beginning the morning by pouring myself a hot cup of coffee and moving to that spot in our home is the nicest way to start the day on a relaxed note, rather than a rushed one.” If your home or apartment features a fireplace—in which case, we’re envious—you may wish to look to this spot to create a reading nook, too. “Many fireplaces in a family room usually have empty space beside them or have built-ins,” designers Sharon Falcher and Sherica Maynard of Interior Design by S&S share. “This type of space is great to convert into a reading nook by adding storage bench seating and a beautiful upholstered back.” Once you’ve determined where you’ll set up your makeshift
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In some cases, the host, landlord or not, might not have the relevant knowledge to be an effective partner. Nobody can know the ins and outs of operating, say, a transient raw fish bar like Crudo e Nudo better than the ones doing the work. Which is why having conversations up front to lay out the terms is crucial. “Some hosts wanted all the control,” Bornemann says. “They wanted to be involved in the pricing, the size of certain dishes, and even the ability to critique dishes.” In those cases, Bornemann and Culhane decided to walk away from those deals rather than risk a contentious partnership. The pair also kept a full calendar of events as a general safety net in case an event didn’t turn a profit. “If anything ever went south, we knew we had another pop-up booked in a day or two.”Food halls are a useful comparison because they are similarly structured as a host and vendor partnership and because a restaurant’s best practices don’t always line up with the requirements of running a stall. Margaret Pak and Vinod Kalathil started their South Indian pop-up Thattu as a stall at the Politan Row food hall in Chicago. The gig was great for brand-building, but the amount of work didn’t justify the profits in the end. Pak and Kalathil were obligated to staff the stall all day, even though the bulk of their sales were made in quick bursts at lunch and dinner. They also had to stick to the same menu, which would provide consistency for customers but was creatively stifling. Ultimately, the experience made the flexibility of a pop-up model that much more appealing. After just nine events, they have earned almost as much as they did over 10 months of full-time food hall vending. “It’s not just a question of being successful but being able to do it at our pace in terms of life balance,” Kalathil says.Managing liability is another important part of running a pop-up, whether it’s specifying payment terms after an event or planning for worst-case scenarios like property damage or personal injury. “There are always risks that carry financial implications in any type of startup business,” says Michael Farhi, a partner at the law firm Kates Nussman
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All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.For many, no Thanksgiving is complete without a green bean casserole recipe. Created in 1955 by Dorcas Reilly and her team in the Campbell’s home economics department, it is served at 20 million tables every year, according to the company.In 2016, BA’s own Chris Morocco set out to make his own version, swapping out Campbell’s Cream of Mushroom Soup for sliced criminis and a béchamel finished with Parmesan, which captures the intensity of just-seared mushrooms as well as all the umami potential of the nutty aged cheese. Well-browned mushrooms are crucial for building flavor here, so make sure not to salt them
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Good, not incredible, but I also made a few mistakes so it could be my bad. But at least the recipe is forgiving. Leaving a review to answer some questions / give my experience on some issues others described below: - I halved the recipe but I accidentally used the full recommended amount of salt (1 tbsp). Surprisingly I thought the saltiness level was perfect, not too salty at all. I have a salty palate, but even so would recommend generously seasoning throughout so that the 1tbsp at the end is the right amount and doubling it would actually be a mistake. 1 thai chili (after halving, that's the full amount) was slightly too spicy for me, but chiles do tend regionally to vary so maybe mine was on the spicy side? - To the person who asked if the recipe could be done with less butter: I lit
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All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Cranberries divide Thanksgiving diners into two clear camps: Those who prefer a chunky compote and those who like a sliceable condiment that jiggles. This cranberry-orange sauce is for the first group. Bright citrus and warming cinnamon are the complements cranberries look for this time of the year, and navel oranges conveniently come into season just in time for the holiday. First blanching the citrus in boiling water removes any bitterness from the peel and pith. Once you’ve added the cranberries to the pan, don’t stray far from the stove. They scorch easily and thicken quickly because they contain a lot of natural pectin, a key ingredient used in jam-making.Editor’s note: This recipe was originally published October 16, 2018.IngredientsMakes about 2½ cups1medium navel orange, seeds removed, chopped1lb. fresh (or frozen) cranberries1cup sugar2Tbsp. unsalted butter13"-long cinnamon stick½tsp. ground allspicePinch of kosher saltPreparationStep 1Place orange in a large saucepan and pour in cold water
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I’m a sucker for cute stuff, particularly any big thing made small. There’s something undeniably fun about those shrink-rayed butternut squash (they call ’em Honeynuts, awww!), two-bite apple pies, and cocktail pigs in a blanket. It’s rarer, however, for things to go the other direction. Probably because Honey I Shrunk the Kids-ing a quiche into something tiny is easier and more normal than, say, making a macaron the size of your face or a basketball-size arancini. On the rare occasion that small food can successfully go large format, it feels festive and special. Big food? Oh, yeah: That’s party food.Mumbai Modern, a new cookbook by Amisha Dodhia Gurbani, which comes out November 2, is full of fun twists on Indian home cooking, utilizing bright flavors and comforting ingredients in delicious ways. “Vegetarian recipes inspired by Indian roots and California cuisine” reads the book’s subtitle, and the produce-laden recipes deliver on that promise. Think pear and chai masala cinnamon rolls, paneer skewers in a cilantro-peanut pesto, and what Gurbani calls the “Ultimate Mumbai-California Veggie Burger,” which, wow, sign me up. But in flipping through the book the first time, the recipe that sent me to the grocery store immediately was for a cheesy samosa tart.This tart is exactly as delightful as it sounds: all of the flavors of a samosa, plus a layer of melty Fontina cheese, blown up to party-size proportions. With the help of a sheet of frozen puff pastry, it’s relatively easy to make and almost impossibly buttery and flaky, exactly the kind of thing I’d be thrilled to find next to the charcuterie plate. From the dough up, it boasts a layer of caram
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All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.We're ready to declare this the fluffiest and easiest creamy mashed potatoes recipe around (though, if you like yours topped with some crispety cruncheties, we understand). The key here is not to waterlog your spuds: boiling the potatoes with their skins on means they'll absorb less moisture, yielding a silky mash, not a gummy one. Yukon Golds are ideal, with rich buttery flavor and creamy texture. As for those skins, the ricer or food mill will catch them—great news for lazy cooks everywhere. (Want all the pro tips? Watch Andy make them here!)If you’re tight on time on Thanksgiving, or any other day you plan to serve these creamy mashed potatoes, you can make this recipe a day in advance and tuck it in the refrigerator. And while you’re at it, you could get a head start with this gravy recipe, which goes great with these potatoes, doesn’t rely on turkey drippings, and can be made up to five days ahead.Editor’s note: This recipe was originally published October 16, 2017.Ingredients8 servings 4pounds medium Yukon Gold potatoes, scrubbed4teaspoons kosher salt, plus more1½cups whole milk½cup heavy cream1head of garlic, halved crosswise3sprigs rosemary1cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature, cut into piecesFreshly ground black pepperSpecial EquipmentA potato ricer or food mill fitted
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Preheat oven to 425°. Rinse turkey under cold water; pat dry and place, breast side up, on a rack set in a large roasting pan. Stuff turkey with onion, garlic, and herbs. Working from neck end of turkey, gently loosen skin from breasts and rub butter under skin and all over outside of bird. Tie legs together with kitchen twine, pour broth into pan, and roast turkey 30 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325° and roast, basting with pan juices every 30–40 minutes, adding more broth as needed to maintain some liquid in pan, and tenting with foil if skin is browning too quickly, until an inst
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About a year ago, my mom texted me a photo that looked like the end of the world. It was taken from her living room in San Francisco, and the morning sunlight should have been streaming through her east-facing windows. Instead, the room was suffused with a reddish glow so dim that I could barely make out her sofa and coffee table. Fires were raging to the south in Santa Cruz and to the north in wine country, and the smoke blanketing SF was a horrifying indication of the destruction just miles away.In 2020, over four million acres were claimed by fire in California. One of the largest incidents
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All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.For this Thanksgiving centerpiece recipe developer and fashion designer Peter Som combined the flavors of very Cantonese char siu pork with those of very British beef Wellington. As a kid, there was nothing Som liked more than when his grandmother would bring over still-warm char siu from Chinatown; he prized the edges in particular—slightly charred and fatty, with ample amounts of that sticky honeyed glaze. This vers
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Growing up in upstate New York, I used to wonder why we eat turkey on Thanksgiving. Throughout the year, we’d see all types of animals daily: squirrels and chipmunks scurrying; deer innocently dropping their heads into my mother’s shrubs for a nibble; even the occasional bear, clumsily sifting through our garbage in search of a late-night snack. But turkeys, it seemed, mostly made their cameos on the cusp of fall (the worst possible time considering their signature party trick). Driving down windy roads, we’d see a cluster of the wild variety dart across the street—a hen leading a pack of small turkey chicks, aka “poults,” or the occasional male turkey, otherwise known as a “tom” or a “gobbler,” bright red waddle and fanned out tail feathers
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We've teamed up with Vermont Creamery to share the cozy new pasta we're keeping on repeat all fall long: a mushroom-packed cacio e pepe riff, with an extra kick of flavor and creaminess from their Cultured Butter With Sea Salt. For some people, it's pumpkin-spiced products that signal fall’s arrival—but for me, it’s mushrooms. Of course you can get great mushrooms at the supermarket nearly year-round these days, but you won't see me reaching for earthy varieties (like chanterelles and creminis) to cook with until it's cool enough for a light jacket. Sautéed, roasted, fried—you'd be hard-pres
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It was Britain’s enterprising nature and quest for food that led to colonization—and effectively changed global cuisine, suggests Lizzie Collingham in The Hungry Empire. There’s no question the spice trade made a permanent impact on the way we eat, one of the largest being the discovery of black pepper. Native to the Malabar Coast of India (present day Kerala), black pepper, or Piper nigrum, is a flowering vine that is cultivated for its fruit, the peppercorn. Regarded as the world’s most traded spice, black pepper gets its spicy warmth from a compound called piperine. Now considered a commonplace ingredient in the pantry (right after salt, and often ground into dust and left to sit on supermarket shelves for long before it’s used to season food), black pepper’s
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I didn’t think I was a puzzle person. No disrespect to Alex Beggs, but the idea of spending all day toiling away at one of those color gradient abominations made my eyeballs itch. But pre-March 2020 I also didn’t think I was someone who would be “into composting” or “own formal sweatpants." And if the Great Jigsaw Puzzle Shortage of last spring is any indication, I am not alone in my conversion.All this is to say that puzzles gifts have gone from niche—maybe something you got for your indoor kid brother or your aunt who collects Hummel figurines—to a viable gift idea for just about anyone. And food people are no exception. Below you'll find the best gifts for puzzle lovers who are as obsessed with perfecting their pie crust as they are with finding all the corner pieces—and
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As a medium-sharp vinegar, apple cider vinegar is easygoing when it comes to being substituted. It is almost always a quick 1:1 replacement. You may not find its exact fruity, acidic pitch in these substitutes, but you’ll make a vinegar chicken, or salad dressing, or cheesy chickpea omelet here that lets the show go on. Call it an understudy, dinner edition. So: Is there a “best” apple cider vinegar substitute? It really comes down to which element of apple cider vinegar you want to replace most: the fruitiness, sweetness, or the sharpness.
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If you’re looking for a salt substitute, it’s most likely because a doctor or nutritionist has advised you to cut back on your sodium intake. In other cases, it might just be because you ran out of salt, but that’s certainly a less likely scenario. Either way, there are plenty of ways to substitute salt without sacrificing flavor. "Just like sugar, we can increase our sensitivity to salt by decreasing the amount we consume over time,” says food scientist and blogger Nik Sharma. Consider the Sodium In Your Diet According to the American Heart Association, most adults should have no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day and, ideally, move toward a limit of no more than 1,500 milligrams per day
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In my mom’s rotation of party appetizers, nothing was more beloved than her pastry-wrapped Brie. Maybe you have eaten a version of this dish yourself: It’s a whole round of cheese topped with a slick of something sweet (she used apricot jam) and encased in a blanket of puff pastry, objectively an ideal combination of things. The baked result was a shiny, golden-brown stunner that oozed molten cheese and hot preserves when you cut into it, begging to be scooped up and spread on tiny toasts. It was sweet, salty, creamy, and crispy—perfect, really, and it never lasted long. Which was fine by her, because with the help of frozen puff pastry, it took almost no time to make.If you’ve ever seen a single episode of The Great British Baking Show, you know that homemade puff pastry is notori
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Cream pies are not the same thing as custard pie. They’re also not exactly pudding pies or ice cream pies or gelato pies (yes, those are a thing, too). They’re in their own lovely lightweight field, able to take on the flavors of summer with juicy berries and coconut just as easily as they can become chocolate or maple or eggnog, making the perfect holiday dessert. Every cream pie is a little different, but they generally call for egg yolks, heavy cream, vanilla extract, sugar, and butter.  From coconut cream pie to chocolate cream pie, from graham cracker crusts to classic buttery pie crusts, these cream pie recipes will make your heart flutter and tummy grumble.  1. Banana Cream Pie
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If you're already thinking ahead to the holidays, you’re not alone. They seem to creep up earlier and earlier each year, and when you factor in very delayed shipping times, it means I’m a little late to the game on buying gifts for family and friends. Thankfully, we have a ton of curated gift guides for everyone on your list—especially those who keep saying they already have everything. We bet they don't already have a beautiful copy of Gastro Obscura: A Food Adventurer's Guide or a robot vac and mop hybrid that makes easy work of cleaning floors. So, the next time your friends or family say they don't want anything, just pick up one of these 33 perfect-for-anyone gifts.
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We've teamed up with Erath Winery—known for their critically acclaimed Oregon wines—to share cooking inspiration for the changing seasons. On the menu: light yet comforting dishes to ease you into the cooler weather, plus the best wines to pair 'em with. While most people are sad to see summer go, I welcome its departure every year. (Farewell, 90 percent humidity and sweating through my T-shirt; I will not miss you.) Fall is my season—and my favorite time of year to cook. I may not reach for a pumpkin spice anything the moment temperatures start to dip, but I do look forward to all the warm, comforting dishes (cheesy tray bakes, squash-filled stews, you get the picture) that come with sweater weather. But even though it's off
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Photo by Julia Gartland I grew up with a steady supply of fresh ginger in my kitchen. While some kids woke up to the smell of pancakes or eggs and bacon, I rose to the sweet and slightly spicy scent of my mother’s ginger tea, a cup of which warmed me up on cold winter mornings and settled my stomach for the breakfast I’d prepare for myself before school (I was a very picky eater). Nowadays, my mornings begin with a strong cup of coffee, but I always have some fresh ginger on hand in case I’m feeling tea or am cooking something
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In Absolute Best Tests, our writer Ella Quittner destroys the sanctity of her home kitchen in the name of the truth. She's mashed dozens of potatoes, seared more porterhouse steaks than she cares to recall, and tasted enough types of bacon to concern a cardiologist. Today, she tackles cookies. It recently came to my attention that there is no consensus on the definition of “chewy” among the people I count on for taste-testing. Unfortunately, this happened to coincide with the afternoon I asked those exact people to rank that exact characteristic across 24 batches of cookies. “Chewy!” said my mom, biting into a sugar cookie a few Saturdays ago. “Just like a scone.” No, that wasn’t right. “
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Ready to host again? Same. Here’s everything we’re cooking, drinking, discussing, reimagining, and letting go of this time around.My favorite part of a good dinner party is the brief moment near the end, when everyone’s still sitting down but stomachs are full, plates are empty, and drinks are dwindling. A rosy glow falls over the table and the mood eases from conviviality to the gauzy atmosphere of sentiment. I feel a warm kinship with my fellow diners, as if we’re bound together by our meal.Okay, maybe that’s the wine talking.But I have fiercely missed that sort of night. As people gradually dine indoors again as the weather gets chillier, my coworkers and I are taking the opportunity to rethink dinner partying. We’re asking the big questions: Can you turn your cheese board into the main dish? (Yes.) How do you clean stuff? (Enlist your guests.) And how many bottles of wine do you need? (It depends; we’ve got a calculator.)Get even more dinner party rules:Of course, we’ve collected our favorite low-lift party recipes, from a really big salad to a samosa tart. And, in case you need some conversation topics for the table, we’re sharing some vital perspectives on what dinner parties represent, who they’re accessible to, why they can change lives, and how they’re evolving from spaces of status to acts of mutual care.So come sit at our table. We’ll lay out the new set of dinnerware and put on some tunes, but we’re probably not fluffing all the pillows before you all arrive. —Karen Yuan, lifestyle editorThe Dinner Party Is Dead. Long Live the Dinner Party.Sit at a circular table, limit to 6 guests, choose a theme: The traditional rules of dinner pa
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All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.From Amisha Dodhia Gurbani's debut cookbook, Mumbai Modern, this tart captures the flavors and flakiness of a samosa with none of the deep-frying, making it a party-ready appetizer that is as crowd-pleasing as it is low-lift. According to her, the Fontina layer is crucial: “Fontina’s a really wonderful cheese and quite underrated, in my opinion—and it goes so well with spicy flavors.” For an even faster turnaround, boil the potatoes the day before and keep them in the refrigerator until you’re ready to build the tart.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.IngredientsChutney1serrano chile or 2 green Thai chiles, seeds removed if desired2garlic cloves2½cups (packed) coarsely chopped cilantro leaves and stems½cup (packed) mint leaves2Tbsp. fresh lemon juice2Tbsp. unsalted dry-roasted peanuts2tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt2tsp. sugar1tsp. cumin seedsFilling2medium Yukon Gold potatoes (about 12 oz.), scrubbed4Tbsp. vegetable oil, divided1small sweet onion, thinly sliced2tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt, divided½tsp. coriander seeds½tsp. fennel seeds1green chile (such as jalapeño or green Thai chile), finely chopped11" piece ginger, peeled, finely grated½tsp. cumin seeds¼cup thawed frozen peas½tsp. amchur powder½tsp. garam masala½tsp. Kashmiri chile powder1Tbsp. finely chopped cilantro½tsp. fresh lemon juice½tsp
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This story about dinner party rules is part of The New Rules of Dinner Parties, a new collection of advice, recipes, and perspectives on one of the things we've missed the most. Read all the stories here.It’s been too long since we’ve thrown dinner parties. And now that we're beginning to get together with vaxxed and boosted company, we want to do things a little differently. As it turns out, the time off from hosting has given us a new perspective. Like: Life is too short to spend all that time in the kitchen! And our guests actually do want to help, so let them. And so much more. So these are our new rules: the things we’re trying out, ditching, and embracing for the first time. We hope they help you feel empowered, inspired, or at least a little more relaxed. Because dinner parties are supposed to be parties, not pressure. And in the end, that's the only rule that counts. Skip the main. If you’re worried or want to ease into the idea of hosting after the past year plus, a dessert party (or snack party) may be a more doable endeavor. It’s easier on you too, requiring much less prep and cleanup. —Zaynab Issa, associate food editorStop hiding in the kitchen. I used to serve coursed dinners to friends, doing mains like risotto that basically require you to be in the kitchen at exactly the same time that your friends are loosening up with wine and cheese and things are getting interesting. Unless you’re serving pasta, you shouldn’t really be cooking anything after your guests arrive. —Chris Morocco, test kitchen directorApply the “clean as you go” rule. Get everyone to do one round of clean up in between dinner and dessert or before your guests leave. Trust me, they won’t mind, and you won’t be left with the dreaded leaning tower of dirties. Assign away, so each person is only doing a little bit! —Rachel Gurjar Otuama, associate food editorEmbrace clutter. Clean your apartment and maybe light a candle or two. But it’s okay to leave out the pet toys, the coffee mugs, the mail, all the detritus that any apartment accumulates. Your friends can know that you actually live here. —Karen Yuan, lifestyle editorDitch the place settings—o
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There is no other holiday on the U.S. federal calendar that lets you celebrate vegetables, salads, and side dishes in such an unbridled, unapologetic way as Thanksgiving does. When it comes to this holiday, turkey—as much as I love the taste of it with its drippings and the amazing future sandwiches it's destined to root—is the one true side at my table. Thanksgiving lets you go the extra mile with the supporting characters, so much so that, for many, they somehow end up becoming the stars of the show. It's a beautiful day, isn't it, when the underdog finally gets to shine? I'm a sides guy, in short. I think many people are. Which is why it makes sense to really nail down your mix because there's a lot going on in side dish land: You've got to keep some mainstay classics because the point of Thanksgiving is, on the one hand, tradition: the comfort of repetition and family and the dinner table. On the other hand, time (and the day off!) to do nothing but dwell in the kitchen, cooking and communing and experimenting with new recipes. In the midst of all the cheesy casseroles and starchy starches (the reliable standbys), it helps to throw in something green, or something crunchy, or something fresh and vibran
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This story about snack boards is part of The New Rules of Dinner Parties, a new collection of advice, recipes, and perspectives on one of the things we've missed the most. Read all the stories here.I usually don’t like rules. But whenever my friends and I decide to hang out in one another's living rooms past 4 p.m. to eat good food, drink a gallon of boxed wine, and laugh (and cry) about everything going on in our lives, we abide by one single rule: Don’t call it a dinner party. The term “dinner party” adds an unnecessary layer of stress. It makes me think of Martha Stewart’s kitchen in the early ’90s—no shade, I love Martha and her flower-embellished frozen vodka—but I am not her. And the thought of hosting, or even attending, an extravagantly dazzling dinner party makes me sweat.My favorite get-togethers are always the ones that satisfy everyone’s appetite, exude a chill vibe, and induce zero pressure to impress others. Katherine Lewin, owner of the Brooklyn-based dinner party essentials shop, Big Night, agrees. That’s why she recommends skipping the “dinner” part of dinner parties altogether—and unleashing the potential of an epic cheese plate. “I think there’s something about dinner parties that feels constraining and somewhat theatrical,” says Lewin. As a host, you’re stressed about creating a menu and having everyone move through the meal at the same time. And as a guest, you’re worried about saying all the right things, not lingering too long over each course, and whether or not you should assert your dietary preferences. Lewin argues that “the idea of a snack table, or a format that isn’t a three-course dinner, gives people freedom and creates a relaxed environment so everyone can eat what and how they want.”As temperatures drop and cozy nights creep up on our social calendars, Lewin explains how she takes a simple cheese board from appetizer to main event. Here are her five best tips for creating a convention-defying snack table that is varied, delicious, and fun.Cheese, duh—but also dips and a huge tin of fishObviously, cheese is a big component of any snack platter. When it comes to which varieties you shoul
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This story is part of The New Rules of Dinner Parties, a new collection of advice, recipes, and perspectives on one of the things we've missed the most. Read all the stories here.Nora Ephron, the writer and filmmaker, said that a round table works best for a dinner party. At a long rectangular table, she wrote, some guests could be left unable to take part in the conversation. M.F.K. Fisher, the grande dame of food writing, would say no more than six people should sit at that round table, and no two of them should be so in love as to bore everyone else. Martha Stewart suggests the host pick a theme rather than cobble together disparate dishes. A round table, a maximum of six guests, a theme: These are mere morsels from the wide array of advice that’s been written down about how to throw good dinner parties. No wonder people fret about them.I grew up in the ’90s assuming that when I was an adult, I’d pursue the perfection of Martha. The tablecloth would match the napkins, and each place setting would be just so in order to display extravagant meals. For a time, I tried doing a cheap impression of that kind of excellence, and I wouldn’t have any fun because it wasn’t real—and it certainly wasn’t really me. I’d worry that everyone was judging my cooking or noticing a mismatched plate, and I’d make too many dishes in the hopes that anything subpar could be compensated for. I’ve even made whole ice-cream cakes, desperate to impress.Now, given time, experience, and a move from New York City to San Juan, Puerto Rico, where I’ve thankfully had to adjust to a much more relaxed pace of life, I’m more confident. My last year in the city, I worked at a wine bar with a tiny kitchen, and while I was certainly not the best short-order cook, my cooking muscles gained new dexterity from fulfilling the orders by myself that I now put to use for friends. These days, with the striving of my twenties behind me, I am content to be more Ina—Garten, that is, who has said that sometimes a takeout pizza with a big homemade Caesar salad makes the most sense. I’m that kind of host, giving something special on the side of something comforting. Think orange olive-
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This story about A'Lelia Walker is part of The New Rules of Dinner Parties, a new collection of advice, recipes, and perspectives on one of the things we've missed the most. Read all the stories here.Around 4 a.m. one August day in 1931, heiress and socialite A’Lelia Walker bolted awake, startled, thinking she’d lost her vision. “Mamie, I can't see,” she said to a friend, pleading for some ice. A’Lelia was staying in Long Branch, New Jersey, where she had been a guest at a birthday celebration. Just hours before, she’d indulged in pleasures like lobster, chocolate cake, and champag
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My father once told me about the time he had dinner with an old woman in a Vietnamese village during his time in the War. He’d loved the food in Vietnam, but, as an American soldier, he was anxious that the woman might try to poison him. I remember thinking at the time about how I’d never in my entire life worried that someone might try to hurt me through their food, but how absolutely defenseless we do render ourselves when we eat something someone else has prepared. There is a disarmament that happens at a dinner party, timed to each sip and chew, one that fosters communion and fellowshi
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This wine calculator is part of The New Rules of Dinner Parties, a new collection of advice, recipes, and perspectives on one of the things we've missed the most. Read all the stories here.How much wine is "enough" wine for your dinner party? Here's a handy drink calculator for you—actually, it's solely a wine calculator. Most people would say that the dinner is the most important part of a dinner party, but I would argue it’s having enough wine. It starts conversations, complements dishes (you didn’t burn), and keeps the party going. You can pull a Tim Allen and turn a turkey into a wildfire, and no one will care if there are plenty of bottles to go around.How many glasses are in a bottle of wine?To start, you need to know how many glasses are in a bottle of wine. This seems obvious, but considering we’ve all had nights where a whole bottle of red wine equals two very large mason jars of Cab Franc while hate-watching Love Actually, it’s important to break it down.A bottle of wine is 750mL, which works out to approximately 25oz. The suggested serving size of wine is five ounces, which would mean each bottle has five glasses. If you want to stick to that math, that is perfectly fine, although personally, I don’t believe five ounces is a glass of wine. I think it’s a joke. Who pours exactly five ounces of wine? No one. If you work from the five glasses per bottle logic, you almost always come up short. According to my very professional opinion, a 750mL bottle of wine works out to be about four glasses of wine, and two chugs straight from the bottle you are awarded as the dinner party host.What's that funky orange wine they're drinking? Read more about it here. Photo by Alexandra GavilletWhat is the alcohol content of a bottle of wine?This isn't an alcohol calculator in terms of ABV, but real quick, here's a crash course on wine alcohol by volume. The average glass of wine contains around 11 percent to 13 percent alcohol. But you might serve a bottle containing 5.5 percent ABV (might be a sparkling wine or a rosé) or over 20 percent ABV (probably a sherry or port). It depends. If a wine has higher degrees Brix, or sugar levels, it will usually have higher alcohol levels. It's got to do with what kind of grapes are used in the fermentation process during winemaking.So how many bottles of wine do you need for your party?Okay, back to the main top
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Photo by Julia Nelson A lot can happen in three weeks. A session of summer camp can start and end; you can effectively incorporate a new habit into your lifestyle; 21 days could simply pass, unnoticed. Or, if you’re Emily Mariko, you could be launched into the status of national hero, TikTok darling, and everyone’s favorite putter-of-ice-cubes into a microwave. A little over three weeks ago, Emily Mariko, who self identifies as “29 😜 bay area california 🌞 food fashion and lifestyle 🥦 long vlogs on youtube,” in her TikTok bio, uploaded a video to the platform of her making what she considers her “best lunch of the week!” She pulls some leftover cooked salmon out of the fridge, places it into a bowl and breaks it apart with the back of her fork. Next, leftover white short-grain rice is piled on top of the mashed salmon. Then she takes an ice cube, nestles it into the rice, covers the whole affair with a piece of parchment paper, and zaps it in the microwave. The ice functions to rehydrate the rice and prevent it from drying out too much in the microwave. She tops the mix with soy sauce, Kewpie mayo, and sriracha, then eats it with sliced avocado, a side of kimchi and pieces of dried seaweed, like a DIY hand roll. It’s hard to overstate the absolute cultural and social implications this video has had. In the three weeks since its r
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This story is part of The New Rules of Dinner Parties, a new collection of advice, recipes, and perspectives on one of the things we've missed the most. Read all the stories here.You're hosting a dinner party, and you are ready. The dining table is set. Your linen napkins complement your tortoiseshell Sabre flatware perfectly. Your new stackable wine glasses have banished those permanently smudged old mason jars from the table. You bought flowers, and they are not carnations. The only problem? You don't have enough plates to go around. Maybe no one will notice that you're eating roast chicken from a bowl?Maybe it's time to upgrade your tableware. I'm not saying you should go out and purchase a 96-piece dinnerware set (Does anyone need twelve teacups? What even is a ‘fruit saucer?’), but matching dinner plates, salad or dessert plates, and shallow bowls do go a long way towards making your table setting feel cohesive. Below, you'll find our favorite ceramic dinner sets—the ones we use at home, secretly want to pilfer from the Test Kitchen, and spend hours gawking at on Instagram. Many are hand-thrown on a wheel by an actual person, and all are not only dishwasher and microwave safe but will also make your dinner party guests marvel at your togetherness—even if you overcooked the chicken.East ForkBack when desks and office lunches were a thing, we all coveted senior food editor Christina Chaey’s perfect East Fork Everyday Bowl, which she kept on hand for grainy salads
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This story is part of The New Rules of Dinner Parties, a new collection of advice, recipes, and perspectives on one of the things we've missed the most. Read all the stories here.At dinner parties, getting the mood right is just as crucial as getting the food right. That’s where music comes in. Sure, you could eat in complete silence if you want to depress your guests. Or you can curate some tunes to get the party going in a way that’s so memorable that guests come up to you with the ultimate ego-stroking question for any DJ: Can you send me your playlist?Are you hosting a cozy gathering with close friends? A giant feast with dozens of people and plus ones? We’ve sifted through our Spotify accounts to find the perfect party playlist for your needs. These are playlists that we’ve used at our own dinner parties, so they’ve already been guest-tested and approved.For the Pajama-Party Potluck"As a Taurus, I was literally born to curate comfy vibes for an evening at home with good friends and even better food. I first made this playlist for a holiday pajama-party potluck I hosted where guests were encouraged to BYOB (bring your own blanket). It’s an eclectic mix of chilled-out tunes that pairs well with a hearty pot roast, some boozy eggnog, and a warm slice of pound cake. If you’re the eccentric kind of host who puts out a face mask bar and likes the playlist jumping from Erykah Badu to Modest Mouse to Shaggy, we’re birds of a feather." —Chala Tyson Tshitundu, assistant editorFor the Afterparty"Hosting a dinner party in the evening and a party party later that night? This playlist, heavy with R&B and hip hop, seamlessly transitions from a slow, “gooey” vibe to an upbeat, bouncy energy. It's engineered to make you shovel those last bites of dessert, get up, and dance. I started this party playlist right around the same time I moved into a new apartment in New York with six other strangers, and I fell into their weekly roommates’ dinner-party tradition during quarantine that brought us all closer together. One day, they designated me to curate music that would help us forget about that food coma, and we've been using this one ever since." —Julia Duarte, art assistantFor the Not-Christmas Festivities"Christmas isn't really my holiday—I'm not religious, and I'm lukewarm on capitalism. But I do love the trappings of Christmas. The scent of pine. Hot buttered rum. Cozy dinner parties that end around a roaring fire. And during those dinner parties, I want to be listening to songs that sound like Christmas but aren't literal Christmas songs. Don’t know what I mean? “Everyday” by Buddy Holly is a classic piece of non-Christmas Christmas music. Ditto Kate Bush’s “Army Dreamers,” Cocteau Twins’ “Lorelei,” or any song ever from an Icelandic musician. Cue up my playlist “A Very Secular Xmas” (shout out to my collaborators Emily and Liz!) and get in the holiday late-December spirit." –MacKenzie Chung Fegan, senior commerce editorFor the ~Cultured~ Cocktail Hour"My college roommate was an editor for our campus music magazine—so I was usually the one handling playlist curation. His taste leaned a bit too speci
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This story is part of The New Rules of Dinner Parties, a new collection of advice, recipes, and perspectives on one of the things we've missed the most. Read all the stories here.Strangers have been showing up at Imana’s house for dinner for almost a year now. On Friday and Saturday nights, her panoramic Oakland patio transforms into Hi Felicia Supper Club, a $225-per-person fine dining experience that includes seven courses and beverage pairings. The dinner series—which has counted the farm-to-table chef Alice Waters among its guests—is “the most fun I've ever had,” says Imana, a longtime Bay Area hospitality worker who uses her first name only.Until local press caught on, people heard about Hi Felicia through Instagram or from friends in-the-know. The dinner club doesn’t have a website with a menu or a public phone number for reservations—only open DMs. “I give almost no information to people,” Imana explains. “You just show up at someone’s house and it turns out to be this really carefully curated, whimsical experience overlooking the hills of Oakland.” Hi Felicia is sold out through the end of the year, and has, to her surprise, become a place people choose for their birthdays, anniversaries, and special celebrations. According to Imana, she’d have none of that business without Instagram.Over the past decade, the food world has come to rely on Instagram: It’s where new projects are announced, where diners save places to add to their “must try” lists, and where everyone shows off what they’re eating. But, especially during the pandemic, the platform also opened new doors, allowing laid-off pastry chefs to start successful micro-bakeries, mutual aid food projects to find communities, and pop-up restaurants to advertise meals to long waitlists without a middleman. And, as Imana found, the platform has helped pop-up dinner clubs gain traction as their customers look for novel experiences and opportunities to gather. Gaining devoted followings, these Instagram-promoted events offer up exciting potential for alternative models of dining—their hosts don’t need a website, much less a brick-and-mortar location or a specific culinary resumé, to make it work.Nala is the name of the large table around which Misha Lasoff and Pearl Banjurtrungkajorn host their Her Name Is Nala dinners. It seats 10 guests, the pair’s ideal number, who gather around family-style food inspired by whatever looks good that week at the farmer’s market. When Lasoff and Banjurtrungkajorn became roommates in New York, they knew they wanted to throw dinner parties; neither of them worked in food professionally but they had a passion for cooking together at home. Assuming the table would be so essential to their shared lives that it would be like another roommate, they dubbed it Nala after The Lion King films. “We wanted to feed our guests with the maternal energy that the mother lion feeds her little cubs,” says Banjurtrungkajorn.The pair had their first official dinner in late 2019, mostly made up of friends. Giving the table her own Instagram page started as a bit of a joke, but after those first guests loved the events, they real
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Pumpkin carving is arguably one of the best parts of fall right up there with swapping your summer clothes for fuzzy sweaters. Much like dyeing Easter eggs, it’s an activity that involves a whole family or group of friends, and everyone gets to put their unique spin on their own. In my family, pumpkin carving often becomes somewhat of a contest (even if that’s not explicitly stated) and everyone comes to the table with what they believe is the best, most original idea, and ways to accomplish it. My dad has broken out the drill and a Dremel, and last year, I carved my entire pumpkin using a flathead screwdriver—whatever gets the job done. If yo
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There comes a time in every home cook’s life when they realize they can no longer survive on a single dull, hand-me-down knife alone: It’s time to upgrade, toss that old workhorse of a blade, or invest in a decent sharpener. If you’ve recently come upon this realization in your own cooking, you’ve come to the right place. While a single chef’s knife can tackle plenty of cutting and chopping on its own, a few additional (and some would argue: just as essential) knives will round out your collection and make you feel all the better prepared to tackle whatever task a recipe may call for. So, in addition to the ever-versatile chef’s blade, a paring knife,
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