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Picture this: It’s the weekend and you’re baking a pie, not because you have company coming over, but just for fun. You’re wearing a thick sweater, thicker socks, and you turn on the oven. While that heats up, you gather ingredients: flour, sugar, eggs, pumpkin purée, and—oh no. You’re out of pumpkin pie spice. But don’t worry: We can fix this! You can easily make DIY pumpkin pie spice at home using other basic spice staples like cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and cloves. Ahead, we’re sharing a few pumpkin pie spice recipes for when you find yourself in a pinch. Pumpkin pie spice is a cozy, earthy, mildly kicky American spice blend (that, just to be clear, contains absolutely no pumpkin). Even though it isn’t made with pumpkin, it’s a popular ingredient in pumpkin-based recipes like pies, loaves, cheesecake, and more. It’s sold in small jars in the grocery store in the spice aisle, and while it has its moment in the spotlight during fall, you should be able to pretty easily find pumpkin pie spice year-round. So what is in pumpkin pie spice? Odds are, several of the components are already in your pantry. The ingredient list leans heavily on baking spices, such as cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and ginger, but the specifics depend on the brand. Let’s review a few for inspiration: McCormick Pumpkin Pie Spice: cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice, sulfiting agents. The Spice Hunter: cinnamon, ginger, lemon peel, nutmeg, cloves, cardamom, star anise, fennel, black pepper. Frontier Co-Op: cinnamon, ginger, cloves, nutmeg. Simply Organic: cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves. The biggest takeaway here is that cinnamon is the first ingredient in every single formula for pumpkin pie spice. Because ingredients are ordered by quantity (from largest to smallest), this tells us that cinnamon is pumpkin pie spice’s dominant flavor. But from there, it’s a free-for-all. So let’s have some fun. Ahead, you’ll find recipes for homemade pumpkin pie spice that are as good as store-bought. As long as cinnamon is leading the band—with a few backup instruments like ginger, nutmeg, and cloves—pumpkin pie spice can be made with many different spices. What matters is that the blend tastes delicious to you. Here, we’ll share a few different versions, depending on what you’re baking (or how you’re feeling that day). Note: You can absolutely scale up these recipes to keep a bigger jar in your pantry. As long as you are using fresh spices (check the expiration date), they will stay good for months. If you’re wondering if your jar of pumpkin pie spice has gone bad, give it a smell. If it’s still noticeably potent, that’s a sign it’s still fresh. However, if it doesn’t smell warm and spicy, it’s sadly not going to give your baked goods tons of flavor. Classic Pumpkin Pie Spice 4 tablespoons ground cinnamon 1 tablespoon ground ginger 1 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg 1 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves Everything-but-the-Kitchen-Sink Pumpkin Pie S
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Photo by MJ Kroeger We’re only halfway through summer, but given how we’re kinda-sorta heading back to normal, we’re already itching to get ready for the most wonderful time of the year: the holidays. The season is going to look a little different again due to the pandemic, but that's not going to stop us from belting ou
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Photo by PEDEN+MUNK If you love cross-back aprons and salt, and you know what a Cae Sal is, odds are you’re a fan of Molly Baz, recipe developer and the author of Cook This Book. Baz is also a sandwich aficionado, and she’s getting ready to share her wisdom with all of us, via The Sandwich Universe, her new podcast with Declan Bond, on the Food52 Podcast Network. We were ab
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Every month, in Off-Script With Sohla, pro chef and flavor whisperer Sohla El-Waylly will introduce you to a must-know cooking technique—and then teach you how to detour toward new adventures. I like foods with a little chew. I’m endlessly entertained by springy tteokbokki in their spicy sauce. I love sucking up squishy tapioca pearls in boba tea through a fat straw. And every kind of mochi gets me excited, from the ice-cream-stuffed mochi bites at TJ’s to pink sakura mochi wrapped in a cherry blossom leaf. Lucky for me—and you! and all of us!—mochi cake is not only simple, but also incredibly adaptable. There’s no folding, no sifting, no tempering, no whipping. Once you learn the basic steps and ratio, you can dream up any kind of mochi cake. Lemme show you how. But First, What Is Mochi Cake? Mochi cake, aka butter mochi, is a staple throughout the Hawaiian islands—everywhere from school cafeterias and sporting events to potlucks and local bakeries. Cut into snackable squares, it’s squidgy from glutinous rice flour and custardy from coconut milk (and, yeah, butter). According to Sonoko Sakai in Japanese Home Cooking, “Apparently the early Japanese immigrants in Hawaii did not have steamers to make rice cakes, so they baked their mochi in ovens instead, discovering along the way that adding butter gave the mochi a nice brown crust and richer flavor.” Butter mochi also has a lot in common with Filipino bibingka, a bouncy coconut-rice cake. Over 100,000 Filipino laborers immigrated to Hawaii in the early 1900s (“and about 65 percent stayed on the islands,” writes Alana Kysar in Aloha Kitchen). Photo by Julia Gartland. Prop Stylist: Megan Hedgpeth. Food Stylist: Ericka Martins. Glutinous, aka sweet, rice flour is made from cooking, pounding, and drying a glutinous variety of short-grain rice. It is not interchangeable with rice flour. While both flours are made by removing the outer husk and milling the inner kernel of rice, they use two completely different types. Rice flour is made from the medium- or long-grain stuff, while sweet rice flour is made from glutinous, short-grain rice called mochigome. If you can’t eat gluten, don’t worry! Even though it’s ca
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Marcus Samuelsson had a challenge: For the Met Gala, Anna Wintour had asked him and his team to bring in talented chefs who also had unique stories to tell. Go for people who have an untold story, he remembered her saying.It was a big task. This year, for the first time ever, the Met Gala will feature a menu with recipes by specially selected chefs. And that’s not all: The menu will be entirely plant-based.The move marks a major change for the September event, which has only offered catered meals in the past. The ten New York-based chefs were chosen by chef and restaurateur (and Bon Appétit brand adviser) Samuelsson as part of a goal to celebrate the city flourishing again after a very difficult year. “We want to tell the world that we’re back—New York City as a place to gather and celebrate is back,” he told Bon Appétit in an exclusive interview. “We’re telling both New Yorkers and outsiders that New York is open for business.”Fariyal Abdullahi, Nasim Alikhani, Emma Bengtsson, Lazarus Lynch, Junghyun Park, Erik Ramirez, Thomas Raquel, Sophia Roe, Simone Tong, and Fabian von Hauske will each contribute a recipe that reflects their unique take on American cuisine. The lineup includes restaurant owners, Bon Appétit Hot 10 alumni, food activists, cookbook authors, and TV personalities, expanding the definition of what it means to be a New York—and an American—chef. “They represent what the food scene in New York today looks like,” says Samuelsson,”what the next generation of food looks like, tastes like, where it lives.”The theme of this year's Met Gala is In America: A Lexicon of Fashion, the first of a two-part exhibit in fall and spring exploring modern American styles as well as associations with issues of equity, diversity, and inclusion. And the decision to feature an entirely plant-based menu was, well, based on modern American appetites. Fine dining restaurants across the country are exploring plant-based menus, most notably NYC’s Eleven Madison Park, reflecting a shift in visions within the industry and palates among diners. “We thought it was important to really talk about what’s present, what’s happening—how food is changing in America,” Samuelsson says. “We want to be the future of American food, of plant-based food. That conversation is happening now.”In the weeks leading up to the event, Vogue and Instagram are sharing Reels of the chefs creating summer-y recipes, such as a watermelon salad, roasted potato skins, and a tuna-less Niçoise salad. They’ll be different from what will be served at the Met Gala, but plant-based as well.For Samuelsson, bringing the plant-based conversation to a fashion event felt natural. “Both industries respect craftsmanship,” he explains. “Being a chef is all about working a lot with style, with people. It’s the same thing with fashion. It’s a different medium, but you’re really expressing a point of view, a sense of place.” As far as eating flora, much of the fashion industry utilizes natural materials as well, he points out. Both industries are exploring their relationship with nature and the environment. And with each other: Take Gucci
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Photo by Julia Gartland Ah, a balcony. The city-living dream. We can give up in-unit laundry, a parking space, and a second bedroom, so long as there’s a teeny bit of outdoor space to bask in. It’s simply one of those things that make living in a city apartment all worth it, because you’ve got your own slice of outside without having to actually leave. That said, in most areas, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a balcony that’s bigger than 20 square feet, which means space is at a premium, and smart solutions for fitting all the things you want out there are essential. While sometimes you’ll need to make the tough decisions between bistro table or vegetable garden, bar or outdoor sectional, sometimes it’s just a matter of employing smart ways to use the small space. Read on for our favorite small balcony ideas you’ll want to replicate in your own outdoor oasis. By and large, balcony floors are made of concrete, and while it’s durable, it’s usually not very attractive and definitely not comfortable underfoot. To combat this, you can lay down interlocking wood deck tiles, which warm up the space, cover up the concrete, and allow drainage underneath when it rains or when you need to water your plants. If you’re low on space and short on privacy (say, your balcony overlooks a courtyard or parking lot) this genius way to add florals and greenery does double duty. Not only does it take advantage of the underutilized vertical space, as the plants grow they’ll create a makeshift privacy screen that still lets the sun dapple in. For balconies with a view (and not much walking-around room), consider turning the railing itself into a bar table. Here, the balcony owner made a simple bar with 2x4s and hung it from the railing with rope, no drilling or damage needed. Take advantage of a rail-mounted bar even further by dangling a few potted herbs, which will love the sunlight that comes in for them. For immediate tropical vacation vibes (and protection from neighbors’ prying eyes), roll out a classic bamboo screen onto your railing. Who needs to take up precious real estate on the floor when a chair can hover over it? This particularly small balcony forgoes a traditional chair or chaise, and instead has a delightful swing chair as seating. Sure, a permanent bar on the balcony is lovely, but what happens when you want space for a morning yoga session, and you can’t get around the assortment of clattering bottles? A bar that folds up into the wall (with hidden booze and supplies storage) is the perfect solution.
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You have a lot of options when choosing a cooking fat for a dish, and each choice comes with its own unique perks and benefits. Take this recipe for Cod With Scallion-Sesame Butter, which includes not one, not two, but three fats, each with a specific purpose. There’s olive oil for searing, butter for richness, and toasted sesame oil for added warmth and flavor. “Regardless of what kind of dish I’m cooking, I’m always looking to maximize flavor from every ingredient,” says Test Kitchen director Chris Morocco, who developed the recipe. “It’s not about having an oily end product, but more about the different aromas and flavors each fat brings to the table.”By that same token, i
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With homemade vanilla pudding, sweetened condensed milk (the secret ingredient no one talks about), and mascarpone, this truly is the best (and easiest) banana pudding recipe. Many recipes call for using instant pudding mix, but making it from scratch adds about five minutes and a creaminess and complexity you won’t get from the boxed stuff.You might think sweetened condensed milk would make for a cloyingly sweet banana pudding, but fear not! The pudding is barely sweetened and the mascarpone adds a subtle tang and slight acidity. I like the velvety richness mascarpone imparts, but if you are team cream cheese (another banana pudding secret ingredient), go for it. And skipping the mascarpo
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