Hummus isn’t the side dip here, but rather the main dish, punched up to a verdant hue from the addition of fresh spinach and herbs. The green hummus is then topped with warmed, crisped dolmades that are quickly sizzled in olive oil along with olives and some more chickpeas. Add some feta, maybe some yogurt, and this dish just might leave you wondering, “Am I a chef at a Greek taverna?” Some practical notes: Because of its mild flavor, spinach is best in this hummus, as opposed to an assertively bitter, peppery green like arugula. Make sure to be very thorough when patting the dolmades dry before sizzling; it encourages them to crisp up and helps reduce oil splatter. —Christian ReynosoAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients5garlic cloves, coarsely chopped½cup tahini⅓cup (or more) fresh lemon juice¼cup plus 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil4cups baby or mature spinach leaves (about 5 oz.)1cup (packed) tender dill sprigs, mint leaves, and/or basil leaves, plus more for serving215.5-oz. cans chickpeas, rinsed2tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1¼ tsp. Morton kosher salt, plus more12–15store-bought dolmades1cup pitted Castelvetrano or other green olivesCrumbled feta or plain whole-milk yogurt (for serving)Freshly cracked black pepperWarm pita bread, flatbread, grilled bread, or pita chips (for serving; optional)PreparationStep 1Process 5 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped, ½ cup tahini, ⅓ cup fresh lemon juice, and ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil in a food processor, scraping down sides as needed, until smooth, about 30 seconds. Add 4 cups baby or mature spinach leaves (about 5 oz.) and 1 cup (packed) tender dill sprigs, mint leaves, and/or basil leaves. Process, scraping down sides as needed, until green and smooth, about 1 minute.Step 2Set aside 1 cup chickpeas from two 15.5-oz. cans chickpeas, rinsed. Add remaining chickpeas to food processor along with 2 tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1¼ tsp. Morton kosher salt. Process until very smooth, about 3 minutes. Taste hummus and add more lemon juice and season with more salt if ne
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You can Grow Your Own Way. All spring and summer, we’re playing in the vegetable garden; join us for step-by-step guides, highly recommended tools, backyard tours, juicy-ripe recipes, and then some. Let’s get our hands dirty. The most exciting parts of vegetable gardening, for most, are the wide-eyed shopping spree for seedlings (or seeds) and the long-awaited celebration of harvest. But there are obviously quite a few things to do in the days between. Let’s face it, gardening can seem like a lot of work, but it doesn’t have to be overwhelming—especially if you can break down the tasks into bite-size goals that you can tackle through the week (or in some cases each month). I know that popping in to examine leaves for pests might not sound as thrilling as watching your first tomato change color, but it’s necessary. In fact, the more comfortable and consistent you get with observing your plants through the growing sea
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Insulated water bottles are a no-brainer. They keep drinks cold or hot, depending on your needs; they’re endlessly portable and reusable; and some are even super pretty (I mean, look at this speckled one. The downside to such an everyday essential? There are hundreds with similar names and similar claims. In fact, before I started testing bottles for this guide, I had a handful of random ones that I’d used on and off but never committed to because they never really lived up to their claims. I’d just never gotten rid of them because, well, they’re still functioning water bottles—I’m gonna need ’em one way or another! But now, after testing nine of the most popular and best-selling insulated water bottles, I’m ready to clear out the junk for ones that actually live up to the hype. How we tested the best insulated water bottles I identified the most popular water bottles based on our readers’ favorite stores and brands, as well as market research. This yielded way too many results, so I filtered them further. Bottles needed to be from a recognizable brand and available at multiple stores for ease of shopping, at least double-walled for proper insulation, made with food-grade stainless steel for safety, have a wide enough mouth to fit rounded ice cubes, and fit a standard car cup holder. The bottles also needed to be available in multiple sizes; I tested ones that ranged between 20 and 24 ounces because they were the most popular size and would usually fit a car cup holder. Once I narrowed things down to nine bottles (whew!), I put them through a series of stress tests and just generally lived with them over several weeks, using each one instead of my everyday Duralex tumblers (which also helped me drink more water!). Cold water test: I filled each bottle with as much ice as it’d hold and then topped it off with room temperature water. I temped the water with a Thermapen food thermometer to make sure it was at 35°F and then took the temp again after 24 hours, which is up to how long most of the bottles claimed they’d keep water cool. Hot water test: With the exception of the Takeya Actives Insulated Water Bottle With Straw Lid, I filled each bottle with water that was hand-hot at 115°F, which I confirmed via Thermapen again. None of the brands mention how much heat they can withstand, and boiling water is never advised, but hand-hot drinks are usually fine. Leak test: I placed a drop of food dye into each bottle and set them on their sides overnight to see if any water would leak and leave behind a little pool of blue dye. Drop test: I literally dropped each bottle five times onto gravel and cement from about six feet up, noting any dents and chips. Fit test: I put each bottle into two different cars’ cup holders and went for a joyride around my neighborhood. One is about 3 inches in diameter and the other slightly larger, at around 3.2 inches. Of the nine bottles that I tested for this guide, six didn’t make the cut—or rather, they didn’t survive the gravel. For the TL;DR of the top bottles’ specs, check out the handy chart below. For all the results, keep on reading. Photo by Angelyn Cabrales 1. Best insulated water bottle for cold water: CamelBak Chute Mag Photo by CamelBak Price: $25+ Cold water claim: Up to 24 hours Cold water temperature after 24 hours: 33°F Hot water claim: Up to 10 hours Hot water temperature after 24 hours: 100°F If you like ice-cold water, the CamelBak Chute Mag is basically like a portable freezer. After 24 hours, it had about 60 percent of the ice left (the most out of all the bottles tested), and the water temperature was a super-cold 33°F—just above freezing. The double-walled vacuum insulation helped keep the hot water hot, dropping down 15° to a warm-enough temperature that didn’t burn my mouth. While most other bottles I tested only had one screw-on lid, the Chute Mag lid has an additional cap so your mouth isn’t exposed to, say, gravel or cement on a driveway or old mail underneath the passenger’s side of the car. The handy magnet prevents dropping or losing the cap itself, and makes it easier to drink with one hand, too. Even though the lid and mouth meant that there were two points that could possibly leak, not a single blue drop of water made its way out. And speaking of dropping things, the plastic lid and handle were pretty roughed up after their introduction to my driveway, but not nearly as badly as some of the others—and the body showed minimal dents and scratches. 2. Best insulated water bottle for hot water: S'well Original Photo by S'well Price: $25+ Cold water claim: Up to 36 hours Cold water temperature after 24 hours: 34°F Hot water claim: Up to 18 hours Hot water temperature after 24 hours: 106°F For hot drinks, the S’well Original is about the closest you’ll get to a traditional tumbler for coffee, tea, cocoa, and the like. As a personal preference, I usually use an insulated tumbler because it has a smaller opening for easy sipping. But the construction is the same with double-walled insulation, so I see no reason why you couldn’t use the same bottle for hot drinks; all of the bottles I tested work fine with hand-hot temps. The S’well Original had the longest heat claim of up to 18 hours, and in my hot water tests, it kept water the hottest after 6 hours, dropping down to just 106°F. The small opening meant that I was less scared to scald my mouth sipping the water, too. There were no leaks to speak of, though the smooth stainless-steel cap makes it hard to screw on tight if your hands are wet. The construction came in handy during the drop test, though—the little divots on the cap and bottom of the bottle masked most of the dents. Unfortunately, it didn’t help hide a rather large dent on the side. Small chips were masked by the speckled pattern on the bottle that I tested, though single-color bottles might not fare so well. The slimmest bottle in the testing pool, the S’well Original fit nicely into the elastic compartment in my tote, but it was almost comical in my car. The 17-ounce bottle I tested had a 2.8-inch diameter so it moved around a lot when I drove; try the larger 25-ounce bottle if you’re a frequent driver. 3. Best insulated water bottle for activities: Takeya Actives Insulated Water Bottle With Straw Lid Photo by Takeya Price: $29.99+ Cold water claim: Up to 24 hours Cold water temperature after 24 hours: 40°F Hot water claim: Not advised It should come as no surprise that the bottle with “Actives” in the name would wind up being the best for running, hiking, and such. Well, it’s not exactly ergonomic to carry a 24-ounce bottle filled with ice, but the little design details were perfect for the treadmill and beyond. The silicone sleeve kept the bottle from bouncing around on the treadmill, absorbed the shock of my driveway so the bottle looked almost new save for a roughed-up cap, and made for a secure fit in my car’s cup holder when I came to less-than-smooth stops—intentionally, of course. Meanwhile, the flip-top straw lid meant easy one-handed drinking, and the rotating carrying loop was easier to hold on hikes as opposed to a more rigid cap. While the straw is not rated for hot drinks, the double-walled insulation still meant cold water stayed chill at 40°F after 24 hours, but without any ice. Not the co
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The only thing better than a good recipe? When something's so easy to make that you don't even need one. Welcome to It's That Simple, a column where we talk you through the process of making the dishes and drinks we can make with our eyes closed.I consider tteok to be my childhood BFF: best food forever. It’s impossible to sing enough praise of the Korean rice cakes with their irresistible gooey, chewy, almost candy-like pull and texture. If you’re the kind of person who keeps your freezer stocked with tteok, a move we cannot recommend enough, you’re probably well-versed in their versatility for dinner. But while classic, savory preparations have a place in my heart, my current favorite way to prepare tteok is as an anytime dessert: These vaguely churro-inspired, quick, pan-seared rice cakes that you can make in minutes.You can often find nuggets and big palmfuls of tteok stuffed with sweet fillings, be it bean paste, honey, or cinnamon and nuts. But it’s less common to find the cylindrical rice cakes, the variety most commonly used in tteokbokki, in a sweet preparation which—a missed opportunity, in my opinion. Born out of a particularly intense snack-time hunger, these dessert tteok are easy to prepare, easy to share, and can satisfy that sweet tooth whenever the craving strikes.Here’s how I dessertify tteokbokkiIn a medium bowl, mix together 2 tsp. ground cinnamon and 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar and set aside. Now for the rice cakes: For a snack-size portion, I use about 1 cup of tteok, preferably the cylindrical ones. Heat up about 2 tsp. neutral oil (like vegetable or canola oil) in a large skillet, add your tteok, and cook each side of the rice cake until lightly charred, about 2 to 3 minutes on medium-low heat.Transfer all of the crispy rice cakes into the cinnamon-sugar mixture you set aside and give it a toss until all of the rice cakes are evenly coated. Transfer to a plate, and you’ve got churro-inspired tteok.For extra pizzazz, I hit it with a generous pinch of flaky salt. Make a simple chocolate sauce to accompany your crispy-chewy rice cakes if you fancy. A plate of dessert tteok is best tucked into while still hot—it’s how you ensur
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Every month, my book club gets together to discuss our latest read. So far, we’ve made it through a whole host of genres: literary fiction, historical nonfiction, graphic novels. But at our next meeting, I’m going to propose a category that we haven’t read yet, and that I bet most book clubs tend to overlook: cookbooks.Over the past few years, cookbooks have become more literary, shifting away from pure instruction manuals into a format that includes personal essay, political writing, and memoir. Of course, these books still contain the delectable recipes and beautiful images that have c
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A few skewers and a hot grill turn this short list of ingredients into a quick, punchy meal. Italian sausage links or a long coil work equally well; I like to thread four links together onto a few skewers so I only have to flip one, self-contained batch. As for the built-in side dish, cutting the fennel before threading the slabs onto skewers means you’ll get great grill marks on each piece, imparting a ton of smoky, toasty flavor. Collect and thinly slice any pieces of fennel that fall off while you’re prepping the slabs to add some raw notes to the vegetable component, made complete with
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The citrusy marinade in this carne asada taco recipe gets punchy flavor from fresh cilantro, garlic, olive oil, cumin, chili powder, beer, a combination of orange and lime juices, and—surprise!—apple cider vinegar, which helps tenderize the meat. Seek out thin cuts of beef like flank or skirt steak for this recipe; they’ll absorb more flavor from the marinade and grill up fast. If you can’t find either, ask your butcher to cut steaks 1⁄4" thick—or carefully butterfly thicker steaks yourself. For maximum flavor and the best texture, marinate the beef overnight.A hot grill is essential for creating the characteristic char on the steak, but it’s also critical for developing deep flavor in the salsa that gets spooned over the tacos. Grill the tomatillos, onion halves, and serranos (if you can’t find serranos, jalapeños will be fine) until they’re blistered; then toss into a blender with lime juice, fresh garlic, cilantro, and a few spices for a smoky, bright sauce that pairs perfectly with the steak tacos. Warm tortillas can make or break a good taco; so toss them onto the grill, too, (about 20 seconds per side) just before serving. —Inés AnguianoAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4–6 servingsSteak6garlic cloves, finely chopped1cup (packed) coarsely chopped cilantro½cup fresh orange juice½cup Mexican pale lager (such as Modelo Especial or Corona)⅓cup fresh lime juice¼cup extra-virgin olive oil2Tbsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 Tbsp. plus ½ tsp. Morton kosher salt1Tbsp. freshly ground black pepper2tsp. apple cider vinegar2tsp. ground cumin2tsp. red chile powder2lb. ¼"-thick skirt or flank steak, cut into 5"-long piecesSalsa and assembly3Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for grill1small white onion, halved2serrano chiles, stems removed10oz. tomatillos (about 3 large), husks removed, rinsed3garlic cloves, sliced3Tbsp. fresh lime juice2½tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1½ tsp. Morton kosher salt1tsp. freshly ground black pepper½tsp. garlic powder½tsp. ground cumin1cup (packed) coarsely chopped cilantro, plus more for servingFlaky sea saltWarm corn tortillas, chopped white onion, and lime wedges (for serving)PreparationSteakStep 1Combine garlic, cilantro, orange juice, lager, lime juice, oil,
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Burger-loving Northern Californians agree: Dad’s Luncheonette is a must-visit spot on any road trip through the Bay Area. Housed in an old train caboose on the side of the road in Half Moon Bay, it’s the vision of chef and co-owner Scott Clark, who opened the restaurant after the birth of his daughter inspired a shift away from a career in fine dining. Now he spends his time slinging nostalgia-driven food like these hamburger sandwiches, which are beloved by locals and visitors alike.“I grew up in a family where we ate everything on white bread, so that part was very easy,” says Clark. When devising the dish that would anchor the menu at Dad’s, he thought, “We’re going to make a hamburger, and we’re going to slam it between two buttery, toasted pieces of white bread.” With a runny fried egg for richness and pickled red onions for brightness and acid, it’s about as well-balanced as a burger can get. Also, because Clark “does not f*** with ketchup,” he slathers the bread with Dad’s Sauce, a sweet and tangy tomato-free spread that he calls “the embodiment of what ketchup should be.” Use any leftovers as a dip or in place of mayo in potato salad. —Kendra VaculinAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.IngredientsMakes 4Pickled onion1garlic clove1bay leaf1½tsp. black peppercorns¾tsp. crushed red pepper flakes½cup white balsamic vinegar or white wine vinegar¼cup sugar1medium red onion, thinly slicedSauce and assembly1large egg yolk*2Tbsp. spicy brown mustard1Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce1½tsp. apple cider vinegar1½tsp. honey1tsp. Diamond Crystal or ½ tsp. Morton kosher salt, plus more1tsp. freshly ground black pepper, plus more½cup vegetable oil2tsp. (or more) plus 2 Tbsp. ghee or clarified butter8slices white sandwich bread1lb. ground beef4slices white cheddar4large eggsTender lettuce leaves (for serving)PreparationPickled onionStep 1Cook garlic, bay leaf, peppercorns, and red pepper flakes in a dry small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring often, until garlic is browned in spots and spices are lightly toasted and fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add vinegar and sugar and bring to a boil. Cook, stirring, until sugar is dissolved, about 1 minute. Remove from heat and let sit 10 minutes.Step 2Place red onion in an airtight container; strain pickling liquid over. Cover and chill at least 1 hour.Do ahead: Onion can be pickled 1 week ahead. Keep chilled.Sauce and assemblyStep 3Whisk together egg yolk, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, vinegar, honey, 1 tsp. Diamond Crystal or ½ tsp. Morton kosher salt, and 1 tsp. pepper in a medium bowl. Slowly stream in oil, whisking until sauce is emulsified and lightened in color. (Alternatively, you can process in a food processor.) Set aside.Step 4Heat 2 tsp. ghee in a large skillet over medium-high. Working in batches and adding more ghee between batches if needed, cook bread, undisturbed, until golden brown and crisp underneath, about 3 minutes. Transfer, toasted side down, to a wire rack. Reserve skillet.Step 5Portion beef into 4 loosely packed
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There’s the kind of chicken salad I want to eat in a sandwich (heavy on the mayo and celery, please), and there’s the kind I want to lazily pick at over the course of an hours-long, chic summer lunch. This recipe is my Platonic ideal of the latter. The tender poached chicken breast is a perfect contrast to the fresh crunch of blanched green beans and sweet corn (snap peas, radishes, or cucumbers would be right at home here, too). The pot of boiling salted water does double-duty here: first, getting the green beans crisp-tender, then serving as a gentle bath for the chicken breast. The creamy, green, herb-packed goddess dressing and generous shower of fried shallots on top keep things feeling healthyish not austere. —Christina ChaeyAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4 servings8oz. green beans, trimmed, halved crosswiseKosher salt1ear of corn, kernels removed (about 1 cup)2skin-on, bone-in chicken breasts (about 1½ lb.), split, or 2 skinless, boneless chicken breasts1oil-packed anchovy fillet¼avocado¼cup extra-virgin olive oil2Tbsp. sour cream1tsp. finely grated lemon zest2Tbsp. (or more) fresh lemon juice1½tsp. red wine vinegar¾cup finely chopped mixed tender herbs (such as basil, chives, parsley, mint, and/or chervil), divided, plus more for servingFreshly ground black pepper¾cup store-bought fried shallots, divided2small heads of tender lettuce (such as Little Gem or Bibb), leaves separated, torn if largePreparationStep 1Cook green beans in a large pot of boiling heavily salted water 30 seconds. Add corn and cook until beans are bright green and crisp-tender and corn is just barely tender, about 15 seconds. Using a spider or slotted spoon, transfer vegetables to a medium bowl of ice water; keep pot of water boiling. Let vegetables cool, then drain and transfer to a large bowl.Step 2Add chicken to pot; return water to a gentle boil. Reduce heat and cook at a bare simmer until juices run clear when thickest part of chicken is pierced with the tip of a small knife (an instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part of chicken should register 150°; internal temperature will climb to 160° as chicken rests), 20–25 minutes for skin-on, bone-in breasts; 10–15 minutes for skinless, boneless breasts. Transfer chicken to a plate; let cool slightly. Shred meat into big pieces; discard skin and bones if present. Add shredded meat to bowl with vegetables.Step 3Purée anchovy, avocado, oil, sour cream, lemon zest, lemon juice, vinegar, ½ cup herbs, and ¼ cup water in a blender, adding more water to thin if needed, until smooth and thick (dressing should be the consistency of heavy cream); season with salt and pepper. Taste and add more lemon juice, salt, and/or pepper if needed (dressing should be bright and acidic).Step 4Toss chicken and vegetables with half of dressing, half of fried shallots, and ¼ cup herbs. Arrange lettuce on a platter; mound chicken salad on top. Drizzle with more dressing. Top with more herbs and remaining fried shallots. Serve with remaining dressing along
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There is a time and place for big chunky croutons with their chewy-crunchy texture, and then there is right now, when we want to see showers of crisp bacon-y panko fall all over every last corner of our salad. It stays wondrously crunchy (even when riding on top of tomatoes) and brings the rich flavor of bacon with it, pairing supremely well with creamy buttermilk and dill-packed dressing. The key here is layering the lettuces and tomatoes to ensure every bite is well-seasoned and coated with seasoned panko and cool dressing. Call it a BLT salad, call it ranch salad; it’s got just enough going on for us to call it dinner. Thanks to BA’s VP of video programming, June Kim, for inspiring th
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Okay, bear with me here, but the best cookout side is my mom’s ramen slaw, made from uncooked ramen noodles (yes, the kind you ate at 3 a.m. in your college dorm room) mixed with shredded cabbage, sliced almonds, scallions, and lots of vinegar and sugar, which softens the ramen to crispy-yet-noodly perfection without a stove or microwave in sight. I thought this recipe was exclusive to the mom community of suburban Massachusetts until my colleague, Shilpa Uskokovic, informed me that her mom made a near-identical version for family parties in Chennai, India. Turns out true culinary genius knows no borders.Since instant ramen is already pre-cooked it’s technically not raw and is perfectly
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No matter how many times I brought it up, Epiphania always gave the same sad answer in her cadenced, Italian accent: “No, you can’t buy it! The house is not on the market!”
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I don’t think a great steak needs much other than salt and pepper, but this creamy fusion of butter and Sriracha sauce certainly doesn’t hurt. It starts with a base of caramelized miso, which deepens its savory-nutty flavor, and adds body to the finished dressing. It brings tang and a gentle pulse of heat from the vinegary Sriracha. It is assertive enough to push through the intensity of a well-seared steak like a late commuter at rush hour, yet would also be fantastic on any other protein like tofu, chicken, or even fish. Keep it warm until ready to use, and in case your miso brings any unwanted lumps, a quick pulse with an immersion blender will smooth them out and create the silkiest possible sauce. —Chris MoroccoAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4 servings21"-thick New York strip steaks (about 12 oz. each)Kosher salt2Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil or vegetable oil5Tbsp. unsalted butter, cut into pieces, divided2Tbsp. white or yellow miso½cup Sriracha2scallions, thinly slicedPreparationStep 1Heat a dry large heavy skillet, preferably cast iron, over medium-high. Season steaks generously with salt, then coat with oil. When skillet is very hot, cook steaks, turning every 2 minutes or so, until deeply browned and an instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part registers 120° for medium-rare (internal temperature should climb to about 130° as steaks rest), 8–10 minutes. Transfer steaks to a wire rack set inside a rimmed baking sheet and let rest 10 minutes.Step 2Meanwhile, melt 1 Tbsp. butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add miso and cook, stirring and scraping bottom of pan constantly, until miso darkens a few shades and smells very toasty and nutty (it will stick to pan), about 4 minutes. Pour in ¼ cup water and whisk until incorporated, scraping bottom of pan to release any browned bits. Add Sriracha and remaining 4 Tbsp. butter; cook, whisking constantly, until butter is melted and sauce is smooth. Season with salt. If your miso is a bit lumpy, use an immersion blender to blend sau
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If you can’t sleep, you may as well snack! Whether you’re nibbling on something sweet just before bed or your never-ending to-do list is keeping you from counting sheep, these 15 sweet and savory snacks will give you something delicious to dream about. There are protein-packed options like trail mix, quick hummus, and a crispy blend of lentils and pepitas. Plus, three-ingredient peanut butter cookies, made with peanut butter, fruit jam, and eggs which totally count as a protein-packed snack IMO. If you want something that’s all-around salty and savory, choose from buttered popcorn, a Japanese-inspired Chex Mix snack, or a spicy grilled cheese sandwich (for the nights when you’re really hungry). Here’s to you, fellow night owls—your secret is safe with us. 1. Perfect Popcorn Microwave it in a bag, stick it in your sturdy Dutch oven, or cook it fresh in an air popper. No matter which route you take, popcorn is one of the best late-night snacks there is. It satisfies salty or sweet cravings, depending on what you mix it with, and it’ll keep you full ‘til breakfast. 2. Hot Honey-Se
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Compared with its compatriots (looking at you, tomatoes and stone fruit!), a bunch of squash at the bottom of the CSA box doesn’t elicit much celebration. But summer for me means finding new ways to cook with this underrated veggie. My favorite? This simple, silky sauce, made with zucchini, lots of shallots, and a tangle of anchovies. With all of the ingredients casually slung in a pot and cooked down until tender, the effort to reward ratio on this sauce is off the charts. Toasted buttered hazelnuts are the perfect punctuation, offering texture and nuttiness. Creamy without a drop of cream and packing nearly two pounds of zucchini (potassium! vitamin C!), this pasta is excellent alongside a few glasses of cold white wine. Seek out bright yellow zucchini such as Gold Bar for the sunniest color. —Shilpa UskokovicAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4–6 servings1½lb. yellow summer squash (about 3 large), halved lengthwise, sliced1lb. shallots, sliced6garlic cloves, sliced10oil-packed anchovy fillets⅓cup extra-virgin olive oil1tsp. crushed red pepper flakes1tsp. ground turmericKosher salt½cup coarsely chopped blanched hazelnuts2Tbsp. unsalted butter, cut into pieces1lb. spaghetti, linguine, bucatini, or other long pasta2Tbsp. fresh lemon juiceShaved Parmesan and basil leaves (for serving)PreparationStep 1Combine squash, shallots, garlic, anchovies, oil, red pepper flakes, and turmeric in a large Dutch oven or other heavy pot; toss to coat. Place pot over medium heat, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are very tender but have not taken on much color, 20–25 minutes. Transfer to a blender; reserve pot. Blend squash mixture until smooth. Season squash purée with salt.Step 2Cook hazelnuts and butter in a small skillet over medium-low, stirring often, until nuts are just golden, 6–8 minutes (nuts will continue to cook off heat). Season with salt.Step 3Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 1 minute less than package directions. Drain, reserv
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Cherry tomatoes in the summer have a magical pull. One minute, you’re strolling through the farmers market; the next, you’re walking around balancing six precious pints of colorful little orbs. They are sweet, juicy flavor bombs that don't need a lot of work to stand out in a recipe. Simply blistering them in a pan with a little garlic and salt makes them jammy in no time. In just a few minutes, they’re ready to be slathered over tangy yogurt or labneh, topped with fresh chives and oily anchovies for a punch of umami. Big toasts make great dinner, and we know it. —Rachel GurjarAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients2 servings¾cup labneh (Lebanese strained yogurt) or plain whole-milk Greek yogurt½tsp. finely grated lemon zest1tsp. fresh lemon juice½tsp. Diamond Crystal or ¼ tsp. Morton kosher salt, plus more2Tbsp. (or more) extra-virgin olive oil, divided21"-thick slices sourdough bread4garlic cloves, finely chopped1lb. cherry tomatoesOil-packed anchovy fillets, chopped chives, and balsamic glaze (for serving)Flaky sea saltPreparationStep 1Stir labneh, lemon zest, lemon juice, and ½ tsp. Diamond Crystal or ¼ tsp. Morton kosher salt in a small bowl to combine.Step 2Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a medium skillet over medium-high. Toast bread, turning halfway through and adding more oil if pan looks dry, until golden brown and crisp, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer to plates.Step 3Heat remaining 1 Tbsp. oil in same skillet. Cook garlic, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add tomatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, until blistered and starting to soften, about 3 minutes. Smash some tomatoes with spoon and continue to cook until they have released some of their juices and are beginning to collapse, about 2 minutes more. Season with kosher salt.Step 4Spread labneh mixture on toasts; spoon tomatoes over. Top with anchovies and chives, drizzle balsamic glaze over, and season with sea salt.
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Sun in your hair, sand on your feet, and a big sandwich to complete your summer. Tossing ripe peaches with red wine vinegar and chili crisp draws out their sweet juices to make a spicy, tangy sauce. Crusty bread, like a baguette or ciabatta, is the way to go: Broiler-toast the bread halves before layering with cheddar or brie, the seasoned peach mixture, basil, prosciutto, and more chili crisp, giving you sweet, salty, funky, and spicy all in one bite. Bonus, the bread will give you your favorite crispy-gone-soggy texture. —Rachel GurjarAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.IngredientsMakes 12large peaches, sliced1Tbsp. red wine vinegar1Tbsp. chili cr
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Good ranch dressing exists beyond the confines of a bottle and this jadeite green version is here to prove it—it’s bright, bold, and punchy, thanks to fresh herbs and spicy green chile. I make it in bulk and keep a batch on hand (stores well covered in the fridge for up to 4 days) to layer under tomatoes, drizzle over grilled meat, or slather onto a corn cob. While listed as optional (it’s really not, in my book!), the MSG adds a savory depth that brings all of the other flavors sharply into focus. —Shilpa UskokovicAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4–6 servings½cup mayonnaise½cup plain thick yogurt (such as Greek or labneh)1la
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My apologies to the ice cream truck, but when it’s hot outside, the last thing I want is sugar. So instead of sangrias and popsicles, I turn to a classic Indian summer cooler, aam panna. Commonly made from green mangoes (also called unripe mangoes) boiled down and blended with spices, mint, and jaggery, the drink is rumored to have “cooling” properties, ideal for oppressively sweltering summer days. It strikes just the right balance—not too tangy, not too sweet, and ultra refreshing.But, you know, it’s not always all that easy to find green mangoes here in the U.S. In a trick passed around the Maharashtrian community in Atlanta, this recipe swaps aam panna’s key ingredient for a classic pantry staple: jarred applesauce. Once blended with mint, brown sugar, and spices like chaat masala and cardamom, the texture and taste of the applesauce mix is surprisingly similar to the original. And while I wish I was back in India, where mangoes of all varieties are abundant, the convenience of store-bought purée is always a win in my book. —Sonia ChopraAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the ret
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Without fail, I eat breakfast for dinner on a snow day—specifically pancakes, waffles, or French toast, stacked high and drizzled with maple syrup, a dusting of powdered sugar, and a pat (or two) of butter. It’s classic comfort food (and a reason to slip on my PJs a little early). But beyond simple breakfast recipes like scrambled eggs with hash browns or poached eggs over English muffins, we have so many breakfast-inspired recipes for dinner like Shakshuka Focaccia (individual pieces of focaccia topped with tomato sauce and baked eggs); a Pizza Omelet, which folds tomato and mozzarella cheese into the center of a creamy egg dish for one; or Spaghetti Carbonara Frittata, which quite literally folds spaghetti and pancetta into the mix. When breakfast is served for dinner, all rules go out the window (go ahead and play with your food!). 1. Prosciutto and Goat Cheese Strata Somewhere in between a frittata and a bread pudding is this savory dish made with prosciutto or bacon, goat cheese, and onions. 2. Shakshuka Focaccia Shakshuka is traditionally an egg and tomato skillet that’s served family-style; these individual focaccia squares have the same components—shakshuka sauce and baked eggs. 3. Cheesy Bread Pudding Waffles Savory waffles? Yes, please! Torn pieces of bread are soaked in a rich custard and then mixed with cooked sausage crumbles, green onions, and lots of sharp cheddar cheese.
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Cold noodles are a necessity for summer eating, especially in Taiwan. You can find liang mian in food stands, 24/7 convenience stores, and in home kitchens. It usually consists of thinly sliced fresh cucumbers, carrots, and egg ribbons nicely arranged on top of bouncy noodles, with a healthy scoop of sesame-vinegar sauce.As a college student in Taiwan, I would often go to one particular hole-in-the-wall cold noodle shop for a late-night slurp after a long night of drinking. It wasn’t an explicity queer establishment, but it was near the only lesbian bar in Taipei, and it provided a sense of queer community, which was rare in my daily life. This recipe is my tribute to the spaces in Taipei that host young queer folks like me, where I got to feel free and comfortable in my own skin while having affordable, delicious food.In my attempt to recreate Taipei-style liang mian sauce with ingredients I can easily find in the States, I was able to make a version of the dish with peanut butter, Kong Yen black vinegar (or Worcestershire sauce), and a few other easily found pantry staples. Colorful summer produce and fresh ramen noodles tie it all together. These noodles have a special place in my heart and tummy, and it’s perfect for Pride parties all summer long.This cool, refreshing dish is a perfect make-ahead candidate. Prep the sauce, cook the eggs, and slice your veg ahead of time, then boil and shock your noodles in ice water just before serving. —Jessie YuChenAll products fe
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We love the simplicity and flexibility of sours, the family of cocktails that combines a base spirit (literally anything) with fresh citrus like lemon and/or lime, and a sweet element, often simple syrup. In this case, we use John deBary’s Super Summer Fruit Syrup, a bright and glorious combination of peak summer fruit like peaches and mangoes, infused with chamomile, ginger, and turmeric. It provides the sweetness that works alongside a base spirit and citrus juice to create a wonderfully balanced summer sipper.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors.
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Place pesto in a large bowl. If using portobellos, remove stems and gills. Tear mushrooms into 3”–4” pieces. Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a medium heavy skillet over medium-high. Arrange half of mushrooms in a single layer in skillet and cook until they start to sizzle, then wrap the bottom of a second heavy skillet that is small enough to nestle into the first with foil and use it to press down on mushrooms evenly (apply pressure with your body weight to really smash the mushrooms into the hot skillet). Cook, pressing down and rotating pan as needed for even browning, until mushrooms shrink sign
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On long sunny days, I find myself filled with a mischievous sort of energy that makes me want to drink an adult beverage before 3 p.m. (gasp). Parched from the beach and looking for something easy and refreshing, I always opt for this lemony-Aperol spritz with tart-sweet kombucha and dry sparkling wine served over lots of crushed ice. It’s excellent for cooling down, but not so strong that I’ll fall asleep on my towel before the sun sets.What distinguishes this drink from its muse, the Aperol spritz, is that it uses kombucha instead of club soda for a finishing blast of bright and tangy ef
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I see your peach cobblers, cherry pies, and plum cakes and raise you this savory stone fruit salad. A mix of the season’s best fruit—peaches, apricots, nectarines, or cherries—laced with vinegar and toasted sesame oil offers a juicy contrast to thin slabs of salty ricotta salata. A shower of umami-rich furikake picks up the saline notes of the cheese and drives home the message that a fruit salad doesn’t always have to be sweet to be great. —Shilpa UskokovicAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4 servings3–4ripe peaches and/or plums, thinly sliced into rounds2tsp. extra-virgin olive oil2tsp. toasted sesame oil2tsp. unseasoned rice
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Your summer cookout corn on the cob is missing one simple flavor booster: chaat masala, a bright, lemony, earthy blend of spices the most notable of which are sharp black salt and amchur (dried green mango powder). I used to think my MIL put too much chaat masala on everything, but after one bite of her buttery, sweet corn coated in the tangy spice blend, I realized that mothers-in-law do, sometimes, know best. Pro tip: Press lime wedges onto a generous pile of spice to create a two-in-one garnish, then squeeze and rub the wedges over each fresh-off-the-grill, buttered cob. Believe me, it’s worth the midday floss. —Mehreen KarimAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affi
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As someone who spent over 10 years working in some of the world’s best bars and restaurants, I don’t flinch at the thought of an elaborate multi-step recipe that yields a very specific single cocktail. But for home bartenders who don’t have the same luxury of time and effort, a single high-value element like this fruity syrup can create a transformative mixer with many uses.It starts with an infusion of chamomile tea, lemon zest, and turmeric that combines with simple syrup to gently poach mangoes, peaches, and ginger. Once puréeed, the syrup gets a finishing dose of vinegar and fresh lemon juice to keep things bright and help to preserve the peak-season fruit. For the smoothest drinks, strain syrup through the finest mesh sieve you have to eliminate any pulp. It’s thick, so you
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I make cold, tomato-based soups all summer because I am notoriously bad at using up all of the heirlooms in my weekly CSA produce box. When I’ve reached max capacity on BLTs and the ’matos are on their last legs, I throw them in a blender and drink the results (don’t knock it ‘til you try it) from a tall glass like a salty, ultra-refreshing smoothie.What distinguishes a salmorejo from gazpacho—another Spanish warm-weather tomato soup—is the inclusion of bread as a thickener. I like toasted white bread here for the complex flavor note and velvety texture it provides. We’re ladling the chilled soup into bowls and giving it the Bloody Mary treatment with spicy, meaty, brine-y toppings that help make it feel like a full meal. —Kendra VaculinAll products featured on Bon Appétit
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What’s better than pie? How about a strawberry hand pie, perfect for you and you alone. As if ripe summer strawberries aren’t exciting enough, chef Nicole A. Taylor takes them to the next level, macerating and infusing them with a bit of fresh ginger, lending warmth to the berry’s floral notes. They get encased in a peppery, butter-based crust before getting baked off (not fried, as hand pies often are) to a golden rich hue. The result is a flaky crust with a jammy berry filling, juices oozing from the sides. Salted goat cheese frosting makes a tangy counterpoint to the sweet strawberries. These hand pies make a great snack as is, or turned into a grand treat when thrown into a milkshake with a scoop or two of vanilla ice cream. —Rachel GurjarAll products featured on Bon Appétit a
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Frangipane tarts are my go-to entertaining dessert all year long. They’re fancy enough that no one suspects I spent all my time on dinner and forgot about the sweet stuff (often the case), but simple enough that I don’t break a sweat getting one into the oven at the very last minute.The ease of a frangipane tart lies in its components. In this recipe, both the tender, shortbread, press-in crust and nutty custard are made in the food processor, so assembly and cleanup are streamlined to just one appliance (plus you can make both pieces in advance if you’d like). And while you should absolutely use apricots during their brief but juicy season, most fruit, like berries, cherries, rhubarb, apples, pears, and even bananas, can get the frangipane treatment. Don’t fret too much about find
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Loosely inspired by Thai green mango salad, yum mamuang, this dish features golden curls of ripe mango enlivened by a squirt of bracing lime juice and fish sauce. Store-bought fried shallots bring easy crunch, and thin circles of chili slap your senses awake. Lush Champagne mangoes are the best here, but sub with your preferred variety, at any stage of ripeness. —Shilpa UskokovicAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4 servings2ripe Champagne mangoes, peeled, cut into irregular 1" pieces1tsp. extra-virgin olive oil1tsp. fish sauce1tsp. fresh lime juiceStore-bought fried shallots, thinly sliced red chile (such as Fresno), and small basil leav
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There’s nothing I want more than a big bowl of shaved ice on a hot, humid summer day. While a shaved ice machine is a worthy investment for the fluffiest, lightest version of this dessert, you can also make it granita-style by freezing milk in a pan and scraping with a fork. Strawberries and condensed milk are my go-to toppings (here, we use frozen strawberries that are thawed but not drained to preserve the precious juices), but this dessert’s riffability means you can top it with whatever you please: store-bought mochi bites, your favorite fruit (think mango or raspberry), tapioca pearls, or nata de coco. —Genevieve YamAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate
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Hiyayakko is a Japanese warm-weather starter or side dish made of a small square of chilled silken tofu, a sprinkling of toppings, and saucy drizzles (think a heap of bonito flakes and puddle of soy sauce, or fresh tomatoes with ponzu). In this version, the simple template goes family-style, with sliced silken tofu carefully shingled on a platter, topped with a savory ground pork and eggplant stir-fry. The combination of cold, custard-y tofu and hot, saucy pork is exactly what I want on a summer weeknight, spooned into bowls and showered with tons of farmers market basil. —Kendra VaculinAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4 servings216-oz
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When I’m grilling, I’m chilling, so any recipe that prohibits me from carrying on a conversation while making it is out. These grilled pork chops keep things simple: Pop your seasoned plums onto the grill just before you add the meat. Then once everything is good and charred, toss the plums in a zingy dressing inspired by the flavors of mostarda, a sharp, heavy-hitting Italian condiment of candied fruit and dry mustard (here we use whole grain and Dijon mustard, red wine vinegar, and shallots). For the most defined lines on your fruit, get your grill roaring hot and don’t move the plums around much. —Tiana GeeAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commissio
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Everyone has their favorite crustacean-and-bread combo. Lobster rolls, crab cakes, the list goes on. But for me, shrimp burgers reign supreme. Probably influenced by the TV commercials for Japanese chain MOS Burger I watched growing up, where kids wearing shorts joyfully chomp into burgers (cue the dramatic close-up of golden fried shrimp morphing into a patty), I can’t resist crispy shrimp nestled between buttered and toasted brioche buns. Create texture in your patties by cutting one-third of the shrimp into chunky ½-inch pieces, while finely chopping the remaining quantity. With a bed of thinly sliced cabbage for freshness and a plop of egg salad that puts the whole thing over the top (in a good way), it’s childhood on a plate.Both the egg salad and shrimp patties can be made ahead
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Did banana pudding make you promises it couldn’t keep? Did it turn out to be just a bowl of runny custard with sad, weepy, brown bananas studded throughout? This is banana pudding’s usual MO and it’s time to fix it! But the thing is, I (and so many of us at Bon Appétit) hate bananas. Something about the texture. So this is my gift to our exclusive banana haters’ club: banana pudding—but no bananas allowed. Just the joy of ripe, tangy summer berries running amok in buttery vanilla pudding and cream, plus a handful of crunchy vanilla wafers. Your banana pudding could never!Strawberries are conspicuously absent from this recipe because they tend to be too watery and don’t hold up well. Like a traditional banana pudding, this version can be assembled and chilled 1 day ahead. Also,
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Bake It Up a Notch is a column by Resident Baking BFF Erin Jeanne McDowell. Each month, she'll help take our baking game to the next level, teaching us all the need-to-know tips and techniques and showing us all the mistakes we might make along the way. As a baker, I’m not afraid to practice patience to get to the perfect end result. But here’s the truth: Some shortcuts are worth shouting about, and no-churn ice cream is definitely one of them. In this month’s ice cream episode of Bake it Up A Notch, I spend a lot of time chatting about this exact topic, and all the things you can do with it it. So whether you are looking for an easy summer recipe hack, or you don’t have room to store an ice cream maker, nothing should stop you from making homemade ice cream this summer. While there are many recipes for no-churn ice creams, I prefer the method that starts with a base of sweetened condensed milk + whipped heavy cream. The sweetened condensed milk pulls double duty here, serving as both a concentrated, lower moisture dairy-base and as the primary sweetener. Many homemade ice cream recipes involve heating the base on the stove, and one reason is to help the sugar dissolve. Using a base of sweetened condensed milk means truly no heat required to get started, so you can manage it on even the hottest of summer days. Flavorings can be added to this base—some examples include things like vanilla or other extracts, spices, citrus zest or juice, coffee, chocolate or cocoa, and so on. Then, whipped cream is folded into the base. The air incorporated into the cream sort of emulates the a
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Photo by Cultiver Memorial Day marks the unofficial start of summer and with it, one of the biggest shopping holidays with major sales on... just about everything. And while there are plenty of sales to shop during the actual weekend, many brands have started their sales early so you don't have to wait while others have released details of their best deals so you can plan out your cart. Some of the best ones we’re seeing are on big-ticket home items like furniture, decor, and bedding, aka everything you’ve been wanting for your space. In case you need a breather between making salt and pepper ice cream and backyard DIY projects, here are the best sales from our favorite shops that your space—and wallet—will love. Photo by Milk Bar 1. Milk Bar For the entire month of May, score an exclusive Food52 reader discount at Milk Bar and use the code Food52 for 15 percent off on orders of $50 or more, with the only exclusion being gift cards. The code can also be used multiple times—which is perfect because we have our eyes on…just about everything. Photo by Goldbelly 2. Goldbelly We hope you’re hungry because new
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You no doubt come across new kitchen products and food brands all the time while scrolling through Instagram, watching your favorite TikToker, or Googling “best air fryer.” Sorting through the good, the bad, and the trendy can feel like a lot; we’re here to help. Welcome to What’s New, a column where we round up the latest in food products, beverages, and kitchen and cooking tools.Some of these items we've already tried and can’t stop using. Some of them are so new that we haven't gotten them in our sweaty little hands yet. Regardless, all of the products mentioned are from brands that we know and love. Whether you’re in search of a gift for your favorite dinner party host or you just like to keep your pantry on-trend, consider this a timely shopping guide.This month, read more about nifty bread ovens from Le Creuset, some outdoorsy styles from apron kings Hedley & Bennett, and a new way to store soup.Le Creuset Bread OvenFor me, the hardest part of making bread isn’t keeping my starter nourished or nailing my shaping. It’s lowering a ball of dough into an outrageously hot preheated Dutch oven. Le Creuset’s bread oven—essentially an inverted Dutch oven with a shallow base and domed lid—makes the process infinitely easier. Like all Le Creuset products, their bread oven is made of enameled cast iron, comes with a lifetime warranty, and is available in a range of gorgeous colors. This is a store-on-the-counter piece of cookware for sure. —MacKenzie Chung Fegan, senior commerce editorThe Everyday NapkinYear & Day is a brand that encapsulates a sophisticated, minimalist aesthetic with a neutral-colored palette, offering everything from ceramic pasta bowls to stemmed wine glasses. Now, they’re collaborating with BA favorite Atelier Saucier on machine-washable napkins that pair with the color palette of their ceramics. The Everyday Napkin is made with 100% recycled fabrics and comes in sets of four. It’s available in Moon Twill (a white cotton twill with contrast stitching) and Daybreak Linen (a blush pink linen with off-white stitching). —Tiffany Hopkins, commerce writerC. Cassis Barrel-Aged Blackcurrant LiqueurC. Cassis has its fair shar
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I love driving up the Oregon coast with my cousins on the Fourth of July weekend, fishing poles and huge beach blankets packed. Most years we rent a big house, with an extra-large kitchen and a long dining table where we can all sit together for meals: not just for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, but for little bites throughout the day, as well. But regardless of where I am, the holiday weekend is, for me, really 100 percent about that CGL (Chill Grazing Lifestyle). Whether I'm dipping crunchy vegetables into my favorite dips (hummus, nori sour cream, garlicky spinach and yogurt) or snacking on BBQ-friendly finger foods (deviled eggs, chips and guac, fish-sauce chicken wings), you can bet I'll be grazing on lots of yummy bites. Here are Food52's best Fourth of July appetizers to get you snacking like a champ, too. 1. Roman Zucchini Fritters These cheesy fried zucchini slices are the perfect summer appetizer; a sprinkle of fresh basil at the end adds a nice touch. "I like to retain some texture in my cooked zucchini so I sliced them 1/2-inch thick, which worked perfectly," says recipe author cucina di mammina. "Since it makes quite a large batch, it's perfect for entertaining!"
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No Space Too Small is a column by Laura Fenton that celebrates the idea that you can live well in a small home. Each month, Laura will share her practical findings from years of observing how people live in tight spaces, and her own everyday experiences of living small—from the hunt for the perfect tiny desk to how to manage everyday clutter. Quick: Where will you find the biggest small-space win? In the kitchen? A closet system? Some genius home-office hack? Take a look around your home—whether that’s a studio apartment or a luxe four-bedroom—and ask yourself: What piece of furnishing takes up the most real estate within your four walls? Unless you’re sleeping on a cot, the answer is your bed. As of January 2022, Manhattan real estate cost an average of $1,612 per square foot, which means that here in my city, one borough away, the 28 square feet of space needed for a full-size bed is worth more than $45,000! A queen? More than $53,000. A king? $68,000. When I wrote about small bedrooms in No Space Too Small before, I gave advice for everything but the bed. However, if budget allows, I do advocate for investing in a bed that makes the best use of the space it takes up, like a Murphy bed, a storage bed, or bunks. (In fact, I’m so passionate about the importance of beds in small spaces, that I’ve written a whole book about creative sleeping spots, The Bunk Bed Book.) Here are five types of smart beds for small spaces—and tips for how you might use them: Photo by Weston Wells Beds with drawers A bed frame with built-in drawers is a great way to put your sleeping space to use. In my own apartment, I have a wooden captain’s bed with six drawers built into the frame, which allows my husband and I to store all our folded clothing right in our tiny bedroom without the need for a chest of drawers. Storage beds are also great for guest rooms because you can store the room’s linens in the drawers and leave your guests the bureau d
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Whatever you do, you cannot empty a packet of shirataki, douse the shirataki in sauce, and call it dinner. Despite containing no fish, shirataki carry a strong fishy taste, which must be rinsed and replaced with other flavors.Shirataki shine in Japanese braises and stews with rich broths. Think of dishes like sukiyaki (leeks, shiitake mushrooms, and other vegetables mingle with thin slices of beef in a sweet soy broth) and oden (daikon, carrots, eggs, and fish cakes simmered in a rich dashi). Shirataki will take on the flavors of the broths without losing their chew.Ideas to get you startedWhile tofu and non-tofu shirataki varieties can be used interchangeably, below find suggestions for each application below.Stir-FryShirataki’s Japanese roots indicate that it adapts excellently to stir-fries, including those that would commonly include a starchier noodle like yakisoba. The advantage of shirataki is that it will never overcook and turn to mush, so err on the side of cooking longer rather than shorter to ensure maximum flavor transfer. Below is one of my go-to preparations, where I use tofu fettuccine shirataki for its thicker texture:Slice an onion (or some alliums of your choice) and sauté with julienned carrots, sliced cabbage, and mushrooms. Season with salt to taste. At this stage, drain and rinse one package of shirataki and add it to the pan. The shirataki will release quite a lot of liquid, as they are stored in water, so take a minute to cook off the liquid until the pan is dry. Add a tablespoon of sake, a teaspoon of soy sauce (or more to taste), and continue cooking until the shirataki has absorbed the seasonings. Fry an egg on the side to top your dish and finish with a final scattering of bonito flakes. Feel free to play with the seasoning; this is also delicious with Worcestershire instead of soy.SimmerWhile it is classic to add shirataki to dishes like sukiyaki and oden, the noodles can also be adapted to other dishes where you would want to add texture to a flavorful broth. I recommend using classic (non-tofu) shirataki for its more toothsome texture in such applications. For example, you can even use shirataki in a tomato sauce, as long as yo
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I haven’t done summer right until I’ve had a brain freeze from slurping a drink too fast. This recipe leans on the powerful blender to do all the work, whirring up a combination of frozen, peeled orange and lemon wheels with maple syrup, salt, and cayenne resulting in a refreshingly sweet, salty, and sour slushy that we couldn’t stop drinking in the Test Kitchen. Enjoy as is or top it up with tequila or mezcal to turn it into a boozy brunch cocktail that comes together in no time, thanks to your blender. —Rachel GurjarAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by
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Like Beauty and the Beast, lush melon and salty cured meat work inexplicably well together. Here, we’re swapping melon’s go-to companion prosciutto for a kickier salami. Add buttery pistachios and briny olives to knock it out of the park. Use honeydew, cantaloupe, Hami, or even watermelon—or a combination of a few kinds to keep things interesting. —Shilpa UskokovicAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients4 servings½small honeydew melon, cut
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It took me approximately one calendar year to realize I did not like espresso martinis. It all started in June, 2021, when the New York Times proclaimed that espresso martinis were BACK, baby. I admittedly hadn’t noticed a single espresso martini out in the wild. But as soon as I finished reading, it was like I was in an espresso martini fever dream.Everywhere I looked, someone slightly younger and not-so-slightly hotter than me was sipping their way around those three signature coffee beans floating on a cloud of foam. And so was I. I drank very cheap espresso martinis at dive bars, where ordering one returned a look of absolute disgust. I drank very expensive espresso martinis at very pretentious rooftop bars. I drank them until my head was buzzing from the caffeine, and my stomach was giving every possible signal to please, stop.I, like so many others, had fallen into the Trendy Drink Trap. It makes sense, that after a truly terrible year-plus spent sheltering at home, distanced from our friends and our families and gathering spaces like bars and restaurants, we’d come back with a ferocious urge to be part of something bigger. There seemed to be a collective itch to prove that we may have spent 52 weeks tending to windowsill scallions and caring for sourdough starters like they were our children, but we were still cool. But this summer, for the sake of my wallet and my large intestine, I’m not falling for it again.As the temperature rises and we all test drive our latest summer personality traits (I’ve decided I’m a Birkenstocks-and-socks guy), it’s so easy to crave the sense of cool and confidence that ordering a trendy drink brings. I feel tangible relief when I look around a buzzing, hyped up bar and realize everyone else is holding the same glass, drinking the same drink. I’ve dodged yet another social fumble.Espresso martinis aren’t everywhere I look anymore, and I have yet to glance up from my barstool and notice everyone except me drinking the exact same cocktail. But this summer’s Trendy Drink is on the horizon, and it’s looming too big to ignore. All the hot girls are drinking Dirty Shirleys—an ombre of Sprite and grenadine, made dirty by a generous glug of vodka. Or mint juleps. Maybe it’s sangria. And some are welcoming back the good ol’ sucker-punching dirty martini. Where Aperol Spritzes once reigned supreme—and ma
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Much of summer's fanfare is devoted to the season's most impressive-looking dishes, like a gorgeous platter of fall-off-the-bone ribs or a tray of bright pink lobster rolls doused in mayo, herbs, and butter. But what about the side dishes? Every main event needs a bit of support on the sidelines—we're talking grilled vegetables, grains, chilled soups, pasta salads, and more—to make a meal feel complete. Here are 87 of our best summer side dish recipes, from grilled corn with basil butter and marinated zucchini to spicy peanut slaw and a no-mayo pasta salad that even pasta salad haters will love. With so many delicious side options to choose from, you're sure to find a few (or several) to serve alongside your main course all summer long. From Our Shop 1. Warm Eggplant & Mint Salad This roasted, charred-on-the-edges eggplant gets just the right hint of brightness from the fresh mint and a squeeze of lemon juice, plus a pinch of sugar for balance. 2. Watermelon Tomato Salad with Cumin & Fennel You'll never eat watermelon the same way again after trying it spiced with cumin and fennel seeds, zingy ginger, turmeric, and a dash of chile powder. 3. Dilled, Crunchy Sweet-Corn Salad with Buttermilk Dressing This raw, crunchy salad calls on some of summer's best produce—sweet corn, red peppers, and crisp cucumbers—and gives them a creamy, herby upgrade with a rich-bu
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Forget hurricane glasses overflowing with a sticky-sweet concoction of sugary mixers and sub-par booze. This frozen Piña Colada recipe is more dignified—but no less fun. When made with care, the preeminent summer drink balances sweetness and tang, has a creamy coconut edge, and packs a punch.You'll need a blender to achieve this rum cocktail's coveted slushie-like texture. You'll need a good amount of freezer room, so clear some space on an easy-to-access shelf before you get started. Using fresh pineapple slices will add extra brightness to the drink; if you can't find a good one, an 8 oz. bag of frozen pineapple chunks will work. This version owes its richness to both cream of coconut and coconut milk, which get blitzed along with the other piña colada ingredients. Freeze the mixture (yes, in its blender cup!), then blitz again to reach a creamy consistency that can't be beat—no giant machine with a twisting arm required. No matter where (or when) you're serving this frozen cocktail, a little umbrella is a nice finishing touch.If you're short on time or freezer space but still hoping for a tropical drink at home, this bird of paradise cocktail recipe with rum, pineapple juice, and Aperol comes together quickly, as does a Mai Tai or a Mojito.Editor's note: This recipe was originally published in February 2016.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affili
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In Hawai‘i, aloha ʻāina (love of the land) is a philosophy of caring for one’s own place and for the environment. “O‘ahu is very close to not being salvageable; they should work really hard to preserve with what little natural spaces they do have there,” Hirata says. While the island of Hawai‘i is more rural than O‘ahu, commercial and residential developments have nonetheless bulldozed through acres of ancient trees and native plants. “I worry about this island,” Hirata says.During the pandemic, the lull in tourism provided an opportunity for the natural habitat of these islands to recover from overcrowded beaches, parks, and trails. It also highlighted the importance of tourists fostering the love of the land when they return. “Native Hawaiian food comes through an understanding and consciousness about place-based sourcing, and [chef Hirata] really highlights that in important ways,” Hobart says. “When tourists get to interact with and taste the ingredients, it helps them understand not only what is unique about Hawai‘i food but also its fragility. It helps them understand why it’s important to protect the environment and traditional practices.”To avoid resource depletion, Hirata never fishes from the same location or forages from the same plant more than once or twice a year. And since he’s the only person curating the wild ingredients, he can easily track the frequency he visits each site. Even with Na‘au’s rising popularity, Hirata has no intention of scaling up his business. “What we put on the plate is not designed for a large luxury hotel or restaurant,” he says. “We wouldn’t be able to sustain it because resources are so limited.” Hirata’s eventual goal is to be able to donate a percentage of Na‘au’s proceeds to fund limu `ele`ele (native Hawaiian seaweed) restoration projects. A primary food source and shelter for native fish, crabs, urchins, and sea snails, limu is essential in Hawai‘i’s fragile ecosystem and an important ingredient in its culinary heritage. He also wants to continue hunting and cooking invasive species like Axis deer, goats, and wild pigs, which damage the ground nests of endemic birds and the roots of native trees and plants. Foraged hō'i'o.Photograph by Bea OysterA  view of the ocean from the coastline in Hilo.Photograph by Bea OysterThe three fiddle heads he collects from his foraging trip will be sufficient for the next handful of dinners. When he returns home from the forest, Hirata pops the fiddle heads into a pot of boiling water that he set up in his garage, taking care to avoid the noxious fumes that would burn his eyes and throat. Twelve minutes later, he pulls out the hāpu‘u, peels the bright green skin to reveal a white asparagus-like interior, chops them into cubes, and marinates them in a mixture of rice vinegar, soy, garlic, onion, sugar, and sesame seeds. One ingredient down. Seven more to go.Hirata continues to gather ingredients in the days leading up to the pop up. One day, he’s chain-sawing down a Peach Palm tree in his backyard to harvest a log-size heart of palm, and the next, he’s crouched down over the side of the mountainou
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Street food is one of the things I miss most about living in India—specifically vada pav. Imagine a hearty, aromatic potato patty with a crisp chickpea flour exterior that gets served on a soft, savory bun, topped with a simple, flavorful dry coconut-garlic chutney, and served with fried green chiles. Vada here refers to the deep-fried potato patty, and pav to the bun. Serve with drizzles of cilantro and tamarind chutneys (homemade or store-bought) for a spicy, fresh kick and some sweetness. While vada pav might be a labor of love, you’ll be rewarded in flavor for the effort. —Rachel GurjarWatch Rachel make this vada pav on our YouTube channel.All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.IngredientsCoconut-garlic Chutney½cup unsweetened shredded coconut4garlic cloves, unpeeled, smashed2tsp. Kashmiri chile powder or paprika1tsp. Diamond Crystal or ½ tsp. Morton kosher salt½tsp. cayenne pepperVada and Assembly1cup chickpea flour2Tbsp. rice flour3½tsp. Diamond Crystal or 2½ tsp. Morton kosher salt, divided, plus more1tsp. ground turmeric, divided⅛tsp. cayenne pepper2lb. medium russet potatoes, peeled1Tbsp. plus 1½ tsp. vegetable oil, plus more for frying (about 8 cups)10fresh curry leaves12" piece ginger, peeled, finely chopped12green Thai chiles, 2 thinly sliced, 10 whole⅛tsp. asafetida1tsp. black mustard seeds½bunch cilantro, leaves chopped2Tbsp. fresh lime juice6kaiser rolls, splitHomemade or store-bought cilantro chutney and tamarind chutney (for serving; optional)Special EquipmentA deep-fry thermometerPreparationcoconut-garlic ChutneyStep 1Toast ½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut in a dry medium skillet over medium heat, stirring often, until golden brown, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a food processor and let cool.Step 2Add 4 garlic cloves, unpeeled, smashed, to same skillet and cook, turning occasionally, until golden and fragrant, about 2 minutes. Transfer (skin and all) to food processor along with 2 tsp. Kashmiri chile powder or paprika, 1 tsp. Diamond Crystal or ½ tsp. Morton kosher salt, and ½ tsp. cayenne pepper. Pulse until mixture is coarsely chopped (small pieces of garlic peel are okay).Do Ahead: Chutney can be made 2 days ahead. Transfer to an airtight container; cover and chill.Vada and assembly  Step 3Whisk 1 cup chickpea flour, 2 Tbsp. rice flour, 1½ tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt, ½ tsp. ground turmeric, ⅛ tsp. cayenne pepper, and ¾ cup water in a medium bowl until smooth. Set batter aside.Step 4Place 2 lb. medium russet potatoes, peeled, in a large pot and pour in water to cover by 2"; season generously with salt. Bring to boil and cook until potatoes are fork-tender, 25–30 minutes. Drain potatoes and return to pot (off heat); let cool slightly. Using a fork, coarsely mash potatoes; set aside.Step 5Heat 1 Tbsp. plus 1½ tsp. vegetable oil in a medium pot over medium-high until shimmering. Cook 10 fresh curry leaves, one 2" piece ginger, peeled, finely chopped, 2 green Thai chiles, thinly sliced, ⅛ tsp. asafetida, and 1 tsp. black mustard seeds,
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So, how did this all happen? A confluence of alleged miscommunication, general delivery app tech glitches, and more, explained below.Why did Grubhub launch the promo?Underlying all of yesterday’s pandemonium is the fact that delivery apps are in hot water. They did record-busting business during the pandemic, when more people were ordering meals to eat at home. But as customers are increasingly dining out again, apps like DoorDash, Uber Eats, and Grubhub are struggling with sales. (Even during the height of the covid-induced delivery spike, these cost-intensive behemoths weren’t turning a profit.) Their stocks have plunged since, and Grubhub, which is currently for sale, supposedly suffe
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It really is the most important (and our favorite) meal, so make it count.Photo by Alex Lau, Food styling by Sue LiWe take our sweet and savory healthy breakfast ideas very seriously. Why? Well, you k
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In Absolute Best Tests, Ella Quittner destroys the sanctity of her home kitchen in the name of the truth. She's boiled dozens of eggs, mashed a concerning number of potatoes, and seared more Porterhouse steaks than she cares to recall. Today, she tackles cheeseburgers. At 1500 West Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena, California—an otherwise unassuming corner—if you look down at your feet, you might be surprised to find a plaque that reads as follows: “On this site in 1924, sixteen year-old Lionel Sternberger first put cheese on a hamburger and served it to a customer, thereby inventing the cheeseburger.”
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Sides are the perfect opportunity to add color, punch, texture and variety to the main event, whether that’s a humungo piece of grilled meat or veggie burgers. Personally my favorite kind of feast is when there are lots of sides and you just dig into them like tapas, main dish conspicuously missing. But hey, however you serve it, these sides—which you can grill on the day of or make ahead; serve piping hot or let sit in the sun for hours with no effect on quality—do right by the 4th of July. From Our Shop 1. Asparagus With Lemon-Pepper Marinade From Bryant Terry Will you be grilling this 4th of July? Then let your main dish scoot over a bit to make room for some sides, like this vegan asparagus wonder where the marinade becomes the sauce. 2. Pimento Cheese Biscuits A handshake between two Southern favorites. If your biscuits have been sitting at room temp for a while, you could throw them on the grill for a quick reheat (and do the same for all the biscuits on this list). 3. Pasta Salad With Roasted Peppers, Green Olives, Walnuts & Anchovies Mix up the colors of the peppers here for a happy-looking pasta salad that’s big on flavor (pretty much all of the ingredients are in the title!). 4. Fully Grilled Caesar Salad Make the dressing in advance and all you have to do on the day of is grill the romaine hearts and bread before serving. 5, 6 & 7. Three Bean Salads Not a three-bean salad, but three different bean salads that are perfect for summer cookouts: Melon & Feta Black Bean Salad, Cucumber & Sumac White Bean Salad, Mango & Chile Powder Black Bean Salad. Make the beans in an Instant Pot for the best texture—but you can used canned in a pinch, we’re not judging. 8. Grilled Corn with Basil Butter Don’t have basil? Use a different herb. Don’t have a food processor? Soften the butter and mix by hand. Don’t have time? Make it in advance and try not to eat it all before July 4. 9. Grilled Peach, Halloumi & Mint "Caprese" Caprese gets some cool new clothes in this recipe that balances soft ripe peaches with hearty halloumi. 10. Grilled Eggplant with Miso & Doenjang These eggplants get a grill without the sauce before getting a grill with the sauce, helping it keep a strong texture when served. If there’s no room on the grill (or you don’t have a grill), use the oven. 11. Coleslaw To mayo or not to mayo? This recipe says yes—but in moderation, along with Greek yogurt and cider vinegar. 12. Grilled Marinated Tomatoes If you’re looking to have
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Photo by Julia Gartland Even before becoming a chef and blogger, food has always been a gathering point in my life. From growing winter melons and Chinese chives in the yard with my grandfather to feasting at the best dim sum restaurants in Toronto, I learned at a young age that food has immense power to bring people together. One of my favorite memories from my childhood was
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Photo by Bobbi Lin I repaint the walls in my apartment so frequently that people often make the mistake of thinking I like to paint. Let me clarify: I do not like to paint. I find it to be among the more tedious home improvement tasks because it requires tons of prep, specific tools, and for the furniture to be in a state of disarray until it's done. What I truly like is eas
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What’s your favorite meal to eat (or make) when stoned?Anything crunchy. On 4/20, I held a kickback at home and I have this one-foot-square grill. It’s the smallest thing ever, I found it at Savers, the thrift store. I put a quarter sheet tray over it and made quesadillas. I asked everyone I invited to bring something to put in them. Also, instant noodles—I add vegetables and a really beautiful egg on top, and that’s a go-to stoney baloney meal. The last thing would be ice cream, because I’m lucky to have a bunch of talented ice cream makers as friends. Right now, I have a honey-mezcal sorbet from Chainsaw in my freezer. And my friend Michelle of Pints Creamery makes an amazing black sesame ice cream. I love eating trashy ice cream, too. I always have at the ready two pints of something that I can snack on.Who is your favorite food person to follow on Instagram?I love Mina Park, she’s @ninetynin.e on Instagram. She makes these amazing whipped cream cakes. She made an espresso-soaked sponge cake with smooth chestnut purée and cocoa-dusted mascarpone ruffles, which is really similar to something I did. They happened at different times, and we didn’t have any interaction with each other. I love the Instagram internet space for pastry information sharing.Who is your dream culinary collaborator?Brooks Headley of Superiority Burger, the vegetarian (but mostly vegan) burger joint in NYC. I’m just waiting for that call. I’ve been adding vegan recipes to my repertoire because a lot of Vietnamese desserts are naturally vegan and gluten-free. They use rice for everything. They use coconut milk for everything.What’s the most underrated ingredient for baking?Salt. It’s really hard to make something too salty. Let's say you have a standard chocolate chip cookie recipe: two eggs, half a pound of butter, and usually one to two teaspoons of salt. What if you made it a full tablespoon? Would it be delicious? Would it be too salty? Probably not. It’s worth it to make that same recipe five different times at 31, 32, 33, 34, and 35 grams of salt, to see if you hit a money spot. Realizing how to hit that ceiling, and how cause and effect works, that’s what makes you a good cook.When you need to get away for a quick vacation, where are you going?Ojai. It’s a two-hour-away oasis. I always go by myself. I don't really allow myself to do stuff by myself, I've got a dog and I've got a partner I'm in love with, so it's really hard to find those moments where I don’t consider anyone else. I've learned the importance of getting away and saying very few words, and letting the surroundings envelop you. Ojai is the best place for that.Which LA restaurants are your go-to for comfort food?Yang’s Kitchen in Alhambra. If I'm really sad and need uplifting, really good food, I go there. I love Woon for their beef noodles and their chicken wings. I live within walking distance to Mandarin Noodle House, and it’s the best orange chicken I’ve ever had. Before I worked at Pearl River Deli, I was a customer there, and they were with me when my dog was lost for an entire day. I drafted a missing dog poster, it was all over Instagram, and it was all ov
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Photo by Julia Gartland. Prop Stylist: Sophia Pappas. Food Stylist: Ericka Martins. We’ve teamed up with Eddie Bauer to help you get in gear for your summer adventures. Whether you’re suiting up for a trek in the woods or planning a family camping trip, the outdoor innovators at Eddie Bauer have you covered. As the weather warms up, it’s time to dust off my camping gear and head into the great outdoors. From local getaways to multi-day treks, there’s a whole world to explore. But just because I'm trading in the comforts of home doesn’t mean I need to sacrifice memorable meals—some of my favorite dining experiences have been under the stars, miles away from any sort of civilization. Whether you’re a novice nature enthusiast or a certified explorer, there are a few things to keep in mind to ensure you have the best time possible. From must-have gear to camp-ready recipes, I’ll break down how to cover all your outdoor cooking bases. 1. Make a Game Plan While I’d love to pretend I’m a spontaneous person at heart, I’m really a type-A planner through and through. This comes in especially handy when camping because in order to have a successful weekend of solid meals out in mother nature, you’re going to have to do a bit of planning. First, you’ll need to think through each meal ahead of time (don’t forget the snacks!) and account for the amount of days you’ll spend in the wild. This is also the time to think about how you’re getting to your destination—car camping, or hiking in?—because it’ll dictate the type of meals you can make and how much food you can carry. With car camping you can pack more ingredients and make more elaborate recipes, but hiking in offers a more off-the-grid experience. Regardless of which type of camping I’m doing, I carry Eddie Bauer’s Bacon 2.0 Pack for packing my essential ingredients since it’s lightweight, easy to wear, and stylish at the same time. And perhaps most importantly, it fits all my pantry staples, like olive oil, flaky salt, and citrus. 2. Gear Up Next, let’s talk tools. To ensure your camping dinner goes off without a hitch, you’ve got to pack the right equipment. I go for gear that combines utility and space saving, like Eddie Bauer’s handy multi-tool, the Detachable BBQ Set. Their Foldable Camp Pantry is an absolute must for any outdoor getaway—it helps keep all your kitchen needs organized, plus it’s compact and easy to transport. The Bygone Backpack Cooler has enough room to carry water bottles, condiments, and food for an overnight camping trip, but if you want to keep a weekend’s worth of perishables fresh, go for the 30-liter Bygone Convertible Cooler Tote. When it’s time to eat, I usually opt for bamboo dinnerware for a sustainable (and aesthetically pleasing) option.
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A perfect amount of rainfall is every gardener’s dream, but the reality is that almost every summer, there are stretches of hot, dry days when we need to water to keep our plants alive. The question of when it’s the best time to water your garden goes hand in hand with the question of how to water. To help you get the most out of that precious H2O, here are some watering basics: Why Water Is Necessary You’ll recall from biology class that water is necessary for plants to perform photosynthesis—the process of transforming water into sugar and oxygen when the leaves are exposed to light. But water does more than that, it also transports nutrients inside the plant, so even in the richest of garden soils, plants will be undernourished if the water supply is insufficient. How Much Water? The basic rule is that your vegetable garden or raised beds needs an inch of rain every week. So for every 100 square feet, that translates into 62 gallons of rain. If it rained, but you don’t have a rain gauge, or you’re not sure how much it rained, check the local weather information. Or, check whether the soil feels dry about two inches below the surface. If you mulched your plants, poke a hole in the mulch to get to the soil. Don’t go by how the soil looks; instead, stick your index finger in it to feel whether it’s dry. (This is one of the few gardening activities for which I don’t wear gloves.) There are exceptions to the 2-inch rule though—sandy soil lets water run through much faster than heavier clay soil, so it needs more frequent watering to make up for the loss. When To Water The best time to water is early in the morning when it’s still cool, which preps the plants for a hot day, but that’s not always easy to accomplish with a busy schedule. The second-best time is late in the afternoon or early evening. Unless you’re using drip irrigation or a soaker hose, watering in the late evening after dark is not a good idea, as the leaves won’t be able to dry off, which can spread fungi (tomatoes are prime candidates for this). Again, there are exceptions to the early morning and early evening watering rule. If your plants look wilted, they are under drought-stress. In this case, don’t wait—water them right away, even if it’s in the middle of a hot afternoon. Hit the Base Always try to spray as little water on the leaves as possible and target the soil around the plant with your watering can or hose; don’t shower the plants from above. If a plant has lush foliage, chances are that water will never reach the soil from overhead watering. Overhead sprinklers also have no place in vegetable gardens, all they do is get the foliage wet instead of the soil, and most of the water evaporates. Dry irrigation and soaker hoses are ideal for vegetable gardens—and they help you save water. A watering wand attached to a hose is also great, as it reaches the base of the plant. Keep A Watchful Eye on Your Container Plants
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The only thing better than a good recipe? When something's so easy to make that you don't even need one. Welcome to It's That Simple, a column where we talk you through the process of making the dishes and drinks we can make with our eyes closed.In my family we live by a few key food rules: Chew your food, clean up after yourself, and most importantly, never, ever waste food. It’s why my mom would hover over me until I ate the last kernel of rice from my plate, or how she was able to whip up delicious meals reborn from leftover knobs of produce from the fridge. This no-waste tenet has been burned into my brain. Whenever I have veggies wilting away in my crisper drawer, my no-waste spidey s
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The only thing better than a good recipe? When something's so easy to make that you don't even need one. Welcome to It's That Simple, a column where we talk you through the process of making the dishes and drinks we can make with our eyes closed.“I know gut health is very trendy nowadays,” my gastroenterologist said through a painfully forced polite grin. I had just asked her if she could somehow check on the “flora'' in my stomach, at which she seemed to internally roll her eyes. And why wouldn’t she? Maybe I have gone through a gut health TikTok rabbit hole and maybe I indulge in more dairy than my lactose-intolerant tummy can handle. But I wasn’t about to give up my love for lab
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Photograph by Isa ZapataAllow me, for a moment, to help you envision this dreamy cream puff. The first of its two fillings is a deeply roasty banana cream that tastes like if Laffy Taffy cost $100. The team at PDF turns whole roasted bananas into a thick puree by cooking the fruit down with a dry caramel and blitzing it in a food processor. “There’s not a lot of liquid, so the starch in the banana tightens it up,” explains Russell. With cream, eggs, and white chocolate, the puree becomes a custard (the fat in the chocolate helps the custard set, eliminating the need to use gelatin); when salted and folded into whipped cream, the custard becomes what’s known as creme diplomat.Sour orange caramel (the second filling) and a crispy craquelin round out the pastry. The caramel is made with the surprisingly sour juice of Seville oranges, sourced from citrus farmers in California; in every PDF cream puff I’ve eaten (three, which may mean I need to relax), it has dripped delightfully onto the plate when I cut into the pastry. Craquelin is a “cookie” topper you may recognize from the likes of melon pan and conchas. In the oven, as the pastry puffs and expands, the craquelin round relaxes into a drape over the domed exterior, then bakes into a crisp, crackle-y finish.Golden cream puffs coming out of the oven.Photograph by Isa ZapataWhen telling me about the cream puff on the phone recently, Russell said the word “comforting” more times than I could count. It’s true that it’s hard not to feel taken care of with big bites of choux pastry in your mouth, but I don’t think I would have made the jump from bananas—which strike me as utilitarian—to comfort food on my own. But the flavor has a personal history for Russell, one that explains his affection. “My mom loves to make bananas foster,” he said. “When I was a kid it was her favorite thing to do. She’d turn the lights off in the kitchen and make a big flambé. So whenever our family got together, we always had caramelized bananas on ice cream. It was a flavor that existed in my palette subconsciously before professional cooking, those dark notes of banana. As a cook, you tend to think abou
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I grew up watching my aunts and mother gather on a veranda at my grandparents’ home to make garam masala, the warm, heady spice blend that powers a lot of South Asian cooking. They cleaned each spice of debris, dried them in the sun with utmost care, and then finely ground them to make an aromatic blend. The process took hours, sometimes days, and turned into social events filled with conversation and catching up. Years later, my mother continued to make her own garam masala in smaller batches in her suburban Mumbai apartment. I always knew when—it was impossible not to catch a whiff of whole spices sunbathing on the balcony.Because I now live between two countries, when I can't go to India, my mother will ship it across continents so I don’t run out. In an attempt to replicate the flavor, joy, and love imbued in my memories of homemade garam masala, I developed my own garam masala recipe with a lot of guidance and wisdom from my mom so you can experience the same in your own cooking.What is garam masala?Garam masala translates to “warm spices” from Hindi. I like to think of it as a living, breathing spice blend, and it can be deeply personal to each family with variations based on region and community. Many households have their own unique mix passed down through gener
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This is Highly Recommend, a column dedicated to what people in the food industry are obsessed with eating, drinking, and buying right now.Every time a cousin, auntie, or uncle came to visit us from Malaysia, they’d bring an extra large, designated suitcase carefully stuffed to the brim with asam laksa-flavored Maggi instant noodles, vibrantly colored jelly cups, pandan extract, and other goodies we couldn’t find in suburban Minnesota in the ‘90s. Prized above all was Baba’s Meat Curry Powder, a heady and fragrant blend of ground spices including cinnamon, star anise, fennel, nutmeg, and coriander. It would be packed into their luggage, layered like lasagna sheets between snacks and clothing. As soon as our visitor landed and settled in, the ceremonial unpacking of food treasures would ensue, and the deep green packages would reveal themselves and make their way into our pantry. Every time my mom made goat curry, she would retrieve a packet and spoon out a precious portion of Baba’s curry powder, perfuming the whole house with the spice blend.How did Baba’s curry powder become such a vital part of our family’s culinary history? Back in the '60s, when my mom was a teenager, vans started making the rounds in the residential neighborhoods of Kuala Lumpur selling various pantry staples like rice and roasted, milled spice mixes to local housewives. Before this, my Didu—or maternal grandmother—and my great-aunt would have to toast and grind the spices themselves, and these mobile spice shops offered convenience and the promise of time saved. The Baba’s brand started just like those other vans, and it became so popular that the spice blends could eventually be found in conventional grocery stores. Like many Malaysian families, that’s when Baba’s became part of our family pantry too. Didu replaced her small-batch spice mixes with Baba’s to make her goat curry. Years later, when my mom moved to America, she took Didu’s recipe—and packages of Baba’s—with her. For me, the curry powder has become a pantry staple that goes beyond the meals I learned from my family. Got some chicken you want to roast? Add Baba’s to the marinade. Want to mak
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The only thing better than a good recipe? When something's so easy to make that you don't even need one. Welcome to It's That Simple, a column where we talk you through the process of making the dishes and drinks we can make with our eyes closed.Born to serial entertainers, I started hosting dinner parties at 18 in my tiny basement apartment. What started simple—soups, roasted vegetables, curries—ballooned into week-long projects as my cooking personality developed. Admittedly, I’m overly ambitious and my baking follows the same pattern: It’s always a challenge and it’s always something different.In order to rein in my ambitions and whittle my dinner party prep to a half-day delight, I’ve learned to cut the elaborate pastries out of the equation and lean into the effortless trifle instead. Guests don't need a fancy dessert, but they do need a dessert. Scoopable layers of cake, cream, and fruit are the ultimate crowd-pleaser and they’re endlessly adaptable to the size of the party, current season, and what I have kicking around the pantry. I’m bringing trifle into the 2022 dessert lexicon.A sort-of formula for a foolproof trifleSomething creamy: For example, whipped cream, whipped coconut cream, custard, instant pudding, Greek yogurt, and mascarpone all work exceptionally well.Cookie or cake: Think shortbread, ginger snaps, chocolate chip cookies, or speculoos cookies if you’re a fan of a crispy-gone-soggy situation. Other fail-safe options include pound cake, coffee cake, banana bread, angel food cake, even supermarket cake layers. Of course, everything is better homemade. But also no one, I repeat no one, will notice if the sponge cake you used came from Entemanns.Fruit: For a punch of acid and tartness, some kind of fruit is essential. Try macerated berries, roasted rhubarb, supremed citrus, cranberry compote, apple sauce—even just hulled and halved strawberries will do the trick.Syrup or jam: Something sticky-sweet is what gives a trifle its cravable factor. A drizzle of maple syrup, honey, date syrup, pomegranate molasses, jam, or caramel are all great contenders.My preferred ratio to build my trifle is 1/3 fruit, 1/3 cookie/cake, and the
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I’d wager that you can order a tequila-based cocktail at nearly any bar in America. And in most major cities, you could likely sub tequila for its smoky cousin, mezcal. The American market is buzzing with excitement for Mexican spirits—just last year, Mexico exported nearly one billion liters of tequila to the United States. While you might have either or both of these well-known agave spirits sitting in your home bar cart, make some space for a few additional bottles. At long last, some of Mexico’s oldest and most delicious spirits are finally making their way to the U.S., and we're here for it. Mexico’s rich cultural culinary history and biodiverse landscape is mirrored in its spirits offerings, and go far beyond jus
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In Cheap Tricks we’ll help you make the most out of everyday supermarket staples. Today, the easiest route to stuffed biscuits.There are some recipes I develop from a place of intellectual curiosity, through a rigorous series of empirical experiments. I tweak and I measure, I note and I weigh.And there are some recipes I develop by accident, when I am a little bit drunk and rooting around in the fridge. I’ll let you guess which route I took to come up with these “25-minute stuffed biscuits.”The truly magical thing about this recipe is that it actually works best with the store-bought stuff, due to the factory-uniform distribution of fat throughout clearly defined dough layers that always rise to their full potential. They are all flaky outsides and molten centers, dough swaddling a
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This dinner salad plays fast and loose with the elements of a steakhouse steak salad; pesto; and tagliata, the Italian combo of sliced grilled steak, arugula, lemon, and shaved Parmesan. The result is crunchy, bright, hearty, garlicky, salty, familiar—but entirely new and fun too. The star is a crusty browned, medium-rare steak; to get there with ease, turn the steak every minute (really!). You can also grill the steak using the same technique, but during the first few turns, let the steak release naturally from the grate instead of prying it off.Instead of blitzing nuts, Parmesan, basil, garlic, and oil into a smooth pesto, the nuts and garlic are chopped together for a rich and crunchy sauce (sort of like a garlicky, nutty French aillade); the Parmesan curls on top like in tagliata; and the basil gets promoted to salad green. By separating and dispersing pesto’s components throughout the salad, each bite is loud, punchy, and different from the next, which is all we really want from a salad, isn’t it? —Ali SlagleAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affilia
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Photo by Banyan Bridges Picture this: you’ve just moved into a new home and there are nothing but white walls as far as the eye can see. While all-white interiors are still having a moment, if you’re someone whose aesthetic leans towards color and texture, you’ll likely be itching to layer some of that in—and quick. Enter: the DIY mural. Whether it’s a living room that could use some personality, a nursery in need of warmth, or a run-down backyard fence that’s calling for an update, murals do the trick every time. You can certainly hire a professional muralist to come in and beautify your space, like Racheal Jackson of Banyan Bridges—or, as she recommends, you could easily take it on yourself. “I started painting murals because I wanted my home to be more interesting on a budget,” she says. “I loved the look of wallpaper, but I didn’t have the funds for it, so instead I bought a few sample pots of paint for $3 each and used the two paintbrushes I had to create my first mural.” Jackson says that for as little as $35, you can make a room feel dramatic, bright, playful, or calm. “I love murals because they’re so versatile,” she says. “Need a focal point in a space? Mural. Need something to balance out a wall? Mural. Feel like your space needs a pop of freshness? Mural. They’re the strongest tool in my arsenal when I’m prob
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On the cusp of potluck season, with another year of mostly outdoor gatherings on the horizon, a recent viral TikTok video seems like a strong candidate for this summer’s trendiest dish: pickle pasta salad. The only thing cooler than this easy pantry recipe might just be that in the five days since the video on how to make it posted, it earned about two and a half million views, and even got a comment from Lizzo, whose music plays over the directions. It's not necessarily a groundbreaking dish—after all, midwestern moms have been stirring pickles into creamy pasta and serving it for picnics and football games for ages. But the timing just hit the crowd hard: Everybody is clearly ready to start thinking about dishes that signify the sunshine season is here, and the simplicity of the recipe helps make it that much more enticing. To make the pickle pasta salad, as per the video and Lizzo’s blessing, you cook a box of noodles, then strain and rinse the cooked pasta with cold water. Stir in pickle juice, chopped dill pickles, diced onion, and cubed cheese. Whip up a quick dressing of mayonnaise, sour cream, more pickle juice, fresh dill, and salt and pepper. Toss everything together to combine, gather your friends, and get excited for the beginning of outdoor entertaining season. Because, in the wo
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You might hear “quinoa” and be immediately be transported back to around 2009, where you couldn’t avoid the grain anywhere, and you keep hearing the word “superfood.” (For the record, I think all food is super). Those days are gone, but we still love quinoa. It’s versatile, filling, and an excellent grain to have in your repertoire. From savory quinoa salads and stews to sweet applications (like quinoa cookies and cakes!), we’re sharing 17 quinoa recipes that are anything but boring. From Our Shop
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Before I even started the five-second video clip my husband sent of a chef’s knife plunging clean through an adorable miniature tortoise, the sight of the thumbnail already had me moaning, “No, no, no!” The animal’s beady black gaze remained unchanged as the blade descended through his squishy, polygon-patterned shell to reveal layers of spice cake and kelly-green vanilla buttercream icing. Horrified but relieved, I proceeded to watch pastry chef Natalie Sideserf’s macabre cake reveal at least another half-dozen times, wondering how on earth she pulled it off (and also, maybe, how sh
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Photo by MJ Kroeger The two terms are used interchangeably for recipes like chicken noodle soup, chicken pot pie, or Golden Chicken Broth With Real Egg Noodles, but chicken stock and chicken broth are not the same thing. Let me repeat myself: stock and broth (whether it be chicken or beef) are not the same thing. Okay—but what’s the difference between the two? Chicken sto
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Photo by Julia Gartland. Prop Stylist: Molly Fitzsimons. Food Stylist: Anna Billingskog It was a languid and hazy San Diego afternoon, the sun lowering behind backyard trees and glimmering through windows, when I became acquainted with Doña María mole at my friend’s house. We were sitting at the kitchen table, talking to her mom, when she announced mole was for dinner. I loved mole, but I had no idea how to make it. I sprang up to watch her hands work, my eyes dancing as she simmered and whisked and doctored this complex, rich, mysterious sauce—turning
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I breathe easier knowing that my egg-frying pans are high-quality and heavy-duty, but that doesn't mean I’m reckless. They live by themselves in a cabinet where they will never get scratched. Stacking a nonstick skillet with other pans or cutlery beats the hell out of them, so after I'm done cooking eggs, I clean, dry, and put mine away in a place where they won’t be touched by anything else. (They're dishwasher safe, but I recommend handwashing.) Zwilling says it’s cool to use metal utensils on the nonstick surface, but I use a rubber spatula when I whip up scrambled eggs. Why run the risk? This babying prolongs their life span, and when I’m talking about the best nonstick pans there are, I want them to live as long as possible. I want them to live forever.Looking for something a
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You can Grow Your Own Way. All spring and summer, we’re playing in the vegetable garden; join us for step-by-step guides, highly recommended tools, backyard tours, juicy-ripe recipes, and then some. Let’s get our hands dirty. The bean has always held a special nostalgia for me. Some of my fondest childhood memories include standing at the kitchen sink helping my grandma snap beans after an afternoon of climbing the apple trees in her backyard. There’s something about that repetitive movement and the sound of snapping that still brings me comfort in my own kitchen as an adult—which is why it’s a vegetable I always have in my summer garden. Regardless of your own food memories, I’m here to encourage you to grow them in yo
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Growing up in a Northern California suburb, California Pizza Kitchen was formative for me—a spot for birthdays, teen theater cast parties, and weird high school dates, and the site of my first bite of spinach-artichoke dip (it was fine). Last year for his birthday, my husband, deeply familiar with CPK’s oeuvre, requested that I make him a classic of the restaurant: the barbecue chicken pizza. Eating it for the first time outside a CPK, tweaked to account for our grown-up tastes, I found the pizza was even better than I remembered.I pulled from my childhood nostalgia to create this recipe: a stellar version of the California Pizza Kitchen barbecue chicken pizza, but made to meet me where I am right now in life—including being easy to whip any time the craving strikes.Barbecue chicken
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Photo by Julia Gartland There’s a lot to love about Kachka: A Return to Russian Cooking by Bonnie Frumkin Morales—our most recent Piglet champion!—but one thing excited me most: vodka. Which, if you know me, doesn’t make any sense. Because I hate vodka. Or I thought I did. Kachka’s first chapter is all about vodka—or, more specifically, infusing it. Tarragon, horseradish, chamomile, cacao nib, cranberry, strawberry. From Morales’s perspective, the possibilities are practically endless: “Alcohol is the perfect vehicle to both preserve and ampl
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What do a couple of master home cooks from Montego Bay, an instructor at the Tokyo Sushi Academy, and the heir to a restaurant dynasty in New Delhi have in common? They all host virtual Airbnb cooking classes and can teach you how to create exciting new dishes from the comfort of your own kitchen.As avid travelers hungry for local experiences, we would frequently book cooking classes through Airbnb in whatever country we were visiting. So when the world effectively shut down in 2020 due to the pandemic, putting our globetrotting on hold, we were delighted to find that the platform had brought all of those culinary experiences we loved online. And just like their IRL offerings, each class is designed and led by vetted hosts who are deeply knowledgeable about their local cuisines and culture
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“My father adored Julia Child. Each weekend morning, he would be found sitting on his reclining chair with a stack of newspapers on his lap. There was always a quiet start to our weekend. The volume was so low that you could hear the pages of the newspaper fold. As I recall, The French Chef would be shown on PBS after Bob Ross's Joy of Painting. I would sit on the carpet with my pens and paper and draw along with his instruction. Then enters Julia Child.” This was Christine Tobin’s first introduction to the world renowned culinary figure. Thirty years later, Christine would grow up to be a food stylist for television and movies, eventually landing on the set of Julia, the new HBO Max series about one of the original “celebrity chefs.”
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Internet memes may tell you “there’s no such thing as leftover wine.”—a joke about drinking that misses the point that very often in daily life we might not finish an open bottle. If we do have leftovers, the conventional wisdom is that the clock is ticking, since wine is best the same day it’s opened, or should be consumed by the next day at most. This is frustrating, though, if you don’t want to drink that opened wine the very next day or if you don’t have the chance, especially when the leftovers are of a great quality. And pouring “old” wine out feels like a waste. Many of us will ask under these circumstances, But how bad can it be? Understanding how long an open bottle of wine lasts is key to making the most of every last drop—before it turns into
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In Underrated, we review the ordinary rituals we build around food. Next up: eating fish and chips with a side of sand.Eating on the beach is an impractical choice. The wind blows sand into food with ease, seagulls will not respect your boundaries, and everything feels sticky to the touch. Still, this evening my family carries our haul of fish and chips past the groups eating their meals straight-backed at real tables featuring plastic cups of Sauvignon Blanc and towards the ocean. Our fried food is swaddled in off-white paper like a newborn coming home. We stop at the border between sidewalk and sand, and even my dad, who eats pizza with a knife and fork, understands we must remove our shoes and feel the warm grains nestle snugly around our toes.Sitting cross-legged near the water sans to
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Photo by Ty Mecham There aren’t many ways in which my kitchen tools overlap with surgical instruments. I don’t use tiny scalpels or tweezers—I’m just never cooking or preparing anything that requires that level of precision—but there is one accessory that’s found in both an operating room and my utensil drawer: my favorite kitchen shears, which aren’t from the restaurant supply store, but rather from the trauma bay. How did I get my hands on these implements? Through a friend who is doing her plastic surgery residency at UPenn. While I was cook
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I’ve been vegan since the dark ages—2009 to be exact. Way before the proliferation of Impossible Burgers, oat milk soft serve, and certainly before plant-based sashimi. It was hard out there for us. Kids these days get to eat all the stunty burgers and deep-fried lasagna.We’ve come a long way in the veganification of the grocery aisle, but I’m most excited about all the plant-based dairy. Bye-bye weird margarine-y “buttery spread” and grainy rubber cheese, and hello fatty, creamy, unctuous nondairy ice cream. Today we have vegan butter options for baking, spreading on cinnamon toast, and even making buttercream frosting as fluffy and tangy as the real thing. Don’t know where to start? Curious if the best dairy-free butter for baking a pie crust is the same as the one you want
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If bright yellow dandelions and purple clover are popping up on lawns that usually look like carpet, or it’s eerily quiet on your street on a Saturday afternoon when you would otherwise hear the humming of lawn mowers, there's a chance that your neighbors are participating in the No-Mow May campaign. The idea behind it is this: In May when native pollinators like bees and butterflies wake up after the winter, they need a major calorie boost to get them started for the season ahead. When faced with manicured lawns with no blooming plants in sight, our pollinator friends are starved for a meal. By not mowing for a month, you create a habitat—and place to forage—for bees and other early-season pollinators. Not mowing for one month in the spring
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Photo by Open Spaces I love the idea of decluttering every drawer, cabinet, and closet in my space à la Marie Kondo but if I'm going to be honest with y'all: my reality looks a little (okay, a lot) different. It's just impossible to part with my material possessions! From the useful—cookware, clothes, coffee, tax documents—to the totally random—a miniature rubber duck I "borrowed" from a bar—I find myself constantly searching for extra space for all of my stuff. With drawers, cabinets, and closets filled to the brim, I recently turned to a storage solution that served me well in my college dorm room days: the cavernous space under my bed. But this time, instead of just shoving all my belongings under there with wild abandon, I decided to take a more systematic approach. With just a few clever tools—think bed risers and stylish wheeled drawers—I transformed the dark, forgotten area beneath my bed into organized heaven. Looking to clear your clutter, too? Whether your bedroom is in need of some tidying or your closets are at maximum capacity, you'll want to check out these clever under-bed storage ideas that won't make you feel like a freshman again. From Our Shop Rebrilli
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Photo by Mark Weinberg For a long time, I thought the best way to care for kitchen knives was with those pull-through handheld knife sharpeners that look more like a clunky office accessory than a kitchen tool. That is, until I worked as a line cook in a restaurant, and the executive chef used a honing steel on his kitchen knives. He used it with lightning speed, swiping his German and Japanese knives up the steel at a 45-degree angle, finessing the blades to laser precision. What’s the point of honing and sharpening your knives anyway? Over time, knives get duller. We know this. But how does honing your knives help? Do an experiment with me: place your palms together, with your fingers pointing upwards. Now, interlock your fingers and separate your palms, creating a triangle formation. See how your fingertips extend outwards? Think of that like dull metal. When knives show wear and tear, the blade becomes uneven, with microscopic changes to its shape that you can’t really see to the naked eye. When you run the blade against a honing steel, it’s essentially straightening those jagged edges (yes, in this case, your fingertips) to create a clean, straight line on both sides of the blade. From Our Shop How to Use a Honing Steel To hone your blade, hold the knife sharpening steel in your
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For most weeknight dinners, my goal is to reduce the amount of time between entering my apartment and eating pasta. The ultimate victory, of course, would be to walk through the door while eating pasta (or—if angels have descended—to arrive home to a table already set with mac and cheese). Instead, I usually settle for marinara sauce made from scratch in 30-ish minutes: Bring water to a boil while changing clothes; cook noodles while sautéing greens with fresh garlic; add pasta to said greens with a splash of cooking liquid and copious amounts of pecorino, olive oil, and fresh herbs; face-plant into plate. My parents, on the other hand, reduced the door-to-pasta period by handily employing the microwave and a glass jar of store-bought marinara sauce we always had in the fridge. Boil pasta, microwave sauce (or heat it up in a saucepan on the stove if you’re really feeling extra), mix the two together, and hush your hungry crew of children. Many avid home cooks might stick up their noses at store-bought “spaghetti sauce,” but at the end of a long day, it’s the fastest way to get to a bowl of red-sauced noodles; it's quicker than cooking down canned tomatoes with onion, fresh garlic, olive oil, and red wine, which despite the admonitions, I don't always have in my pantry. And yet, most jarred sauces could benefit from a bit of zhushing to reach their full flavor and freshness potential. Some jars of tomato sauce are, indeed, superior to others. Look for sauces that use whole tomatoes and no added sugar. Here are Cook’s Illustrated’s top picks. As for our own team, we’re in agreement that the best jarred marinara sauce is, hands down, Rao’s. Staff writer Kelly Vaughan is a devoted user, as are editorial lead Margaret Eby and editorial assistant Lucy Simon. Lucy, however, makes an important distinction—“it must be marinara, not the tomato basil sauce.” Here’s how to make a jar of spaghetti sauce taste so much better (if not entirely homemade), easily. The bare-bones, do-this-one-thing approach: 1. Reduce it on the stove
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Every week in Genius Recipes—often with your help!—Food52 Founding Editor and lifelong Genius-hunter Kristen Miglore is unearthing recipes that will change the way you cook. When Diana Yen and I got matched up to create an item for the snack break at Cherry Bombe Jubilee, Diana wanted something playful, something visual. As the founder of A LA CARTE, a studio that specializes in food photography, styling, and recipe development, Yen is always focusing on how to make individual ingredients sing. She lives in Ojai, California (which she’s dubbed “the Upstate of L.A.”) and visits the farmers market weekly, letting local and seasonal produce guide her cooking. In her work, ingredients come first, keeping in mind the simplest way to execute. Usually a recipe is done once and then never used again. I, on the other hand, am the founder of Anita’s Yogurt based in Brooklyn, NY. I’m a former vegan chef, and I created my signature coconut yogurt in her home kitchen to use in dessert recipes. Nine years later, the brand has sold over a million cups of yogurt from coast-to-coa
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Maybe you've heard, but here at BA, we like to cook. Sometimes, though, even the easiest recipe isn't easy enough, and that’s where the best meal delivery services come in. Think curated grocery deliveries that come with recipes, pre-portioned ingredients, or even fully prepared dinners if you’re into that. To help you narrow down your options—you have many—we tried some of the most popular meal kits around. Here’s what we learned: While all of them have their pros and cons, there’s a meal delivery company for every kind of cook (and non-cook). So whether you’re looking for a subscription service that meets specific dietary needs, prioritizes high-quality ingredients, or offers a good selection of budget-friendly healthy meals, you’ll surely find your match below.Home ChefHome Chef has a nice variety of meals, and if you’ve got dietary restrictions, the customization opportunities here are many. There are oven-ready meals that come with their own tin and grill-ready meals that arrive in a foil bag. There are the more traditional pre-portioned 30-minute meal kits, prepped 15-minute meal kits, and the Fast & Fresh option: a fully prepared meal that you just have to stick in the oven or microwave. I am not a mom to anyone besides two cats who eat out of cans, but if I were a parent to human children, I imagine these options would feel like blessings. For those with more time to spare, the “Culinary Collection” offers some more advanced recipes, like blackened mahi-mahi with lemon dill cream, sautéed asparagus, and Parmesan potato pressé—a dish that turned out to be a bit too advanced for yours truly because I don’t own a muffin tin. (But did the challenge of making do without make me a better home chef? Perhaps it did, reader. Perhaps it did.) They also have snack, dessert, and breakfast options like maple brown sugar oatmeal bites from GoOats, a product I will be buying again because who doesn’t want to eat oatmeal that tastes like donut holes? While none of the meals blew me away in terms of flavor and the packaging was a bit gratuitous, if you’re looking for family-friendly meals to feed picky eaters, you will find a lot to apprec
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Dan Pelosi’s signature tagline “I live here now” could not be more fitting for his new gig. Dan—aka GrossyPelosi—is joining Food52 as a Resident and video host of his new series, “The Secret Sauce.” You may know Dan for his famous vodka sauce (known lovingly by GrossyPelosi fans as ‘The Sawce’, his expert taste and eye for design (see his curated Grossery List), or from his delightful and delicious Instagram presence @GrossyPelosi. Now, he’s traveling across the Tri-State area to visit Food52 community members to share their most beloved recipes and cook together. Dan’s love of food started in his family kitchen, cooking with his Italian- and Portuguese-American parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents (his 100-year-old grandpa Bimpy’s recipe for Giambotta is one of our favorites). While studying abroad in Italy, during college at the Rhode Island School of Design, Dan rekindled his love for cooking and sharing his appreciation for food with others. Fast forward 12 years and Dan is a full-time content creator, recipe developer, and writer, forging a new community through food and social media. In “The Secret Sauce’s” series premiere, Dan visits Suzanne, a longtime member of the Food52 community, food blogger, and avid home cook who channels her Italian-American heritage into her home cooking. Suzanne teaches Dan to make her recipe for Meatloaf, Plain and Simple, which won Food52’s recipe contest back in 2011. The two are certainly kindred spirits: “I grew up in a kitchen of Italian women telling me what to do, so this is truly my comfort zone,” says Dan as he and Suzanne chop vegetables at her kitchen table. “I did, too,” agrees Suzanne. The recipe comes from Suzanne’s mother, and was a staple on her childhood table. Her classic meatloaf comes together with a mix of both raw and cooked vegetables, ground pork and beef, and breadcrumbs. But, the best part about making this meatloaf are the sandwi
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As a child of suburbia, I have a special fondness for mall restaurants, the ultimate champion of which is California Pizza Kitchen. In particular, the chain’s BBQ Chicken Pizza looms large in my memory: sweeter than pizza probably should be, but savory too, with just enough cilantro sprinkled over the top to count as the inclusion of a vegetable. It was the meal I requested for at least one grade school birthday and shared with friends many times once I got my driver’s license and had the freedom to go anywhere (of course we picked…the mall).This recipe is a vegetarian twist on the CPK f
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This is our guide for how to spend the best possible day eating, drinking, and adventuring through a new-to-you city. Here, Bradley James Dry—special events chef and long-time Tulsan—shares his tips for where to eat and what to do if you happen to find yourself on Tulsa Time.Tulsa is a just-big-enough town. It’s bike-friendly and has an awesome LGBTQIA+ community; we have beautiful parks, an amazing music scene, and 9 out of 10 folks you encounter are really nice. People have a lot of preconceived notions about Oklahoma: They think it’s Southwestern, Midwestern, or Southern. It’s non
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This is Highly Recommend, a column dedicated to what people in the food industry are obsessed with eating, drinking, and buying right now.Unlike the mini food processor and mini baking dish I use all the time, I never thought my mini ceramic egg pan made much sense. I received it as a gift, and while it quickly earned the title of Cutest Pan In My Arsenal, I couldn’t see myself reaching for a 5-inch skillet in place of my regular degular 10-inch nonstick, even for eggs. Why would I ever do that? I’d think to myself every time I would see it in the cabinet. But one night, when my totally normal, not-at-all-random urge to eat chocolate chip pancakes for dinner set in and there were zero clean pans in sight—except for, you guessed it—my options were slim: Do some dishes, or finally use that teeny pan. (Not eating pancakes was not an option at this moment.)I set the teensy egg pan over medium heat, tossed in a gob of butter, poured in some pancake batter, and the rest is history. The pancakes, which were slightly bigger than silver dollars, were perfection: fluffy and tall, extra buttery, and adorned with supremely crispy edges. Thus I learned that cooking a pancake in a small pan has its perks. First, even if your batter is runny, your pancake can only spread so far. It cooks up not out, resulting in a puffier cake. As it cooks, the sides of the pancake are in contact with the hot sides of the pan, making for crispy edges all around—something that can’t really be achieved with bigger pans or griddles. The butter, which I’d recommend using generously, also has nowhere to go, so the pancake essentially “fries” in a pool of fat until it’s done cooking. Since the batter will reach the edges of the tiny pan, each pancake naturally forms into a perfect circle. The entire pancake-making process—pouring, setting, flipping—suddenly becomes a less fussy ordeal, which is exactly what I want when cooking for one at 8:30 p.m. on a weeknight. Maybe it isn't the most convenient method if you’re making pancakes for a family of five, but if you’re a solo diner with the munchies, it’s perfect.Like the other nonstick pans you’ll find from GreenPan, the egg pan (which also comes in a square format for breakfast sandwiches on toast) is made with light-but-durable aluminum that conducts heat like a boss. Thanks to a super sleek PFAS-free thermolon coa
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Rich, dark, and dare I say, moist, nothing beats a no-frills classic chocolate cake. It’s what I turn to when I want dessert to really hit the spot. But if like me, you have been on a mission to make your chocolate cakes better—i.e., more deep and more, uh, chocolaty— then you’ve likely followed a glut of internet tips. You bought the Dutch process cocoa powder. You used a combination of cocoa and chopped chocolate in the batter. You swapped the granulated white sugar for dark brown. You added soy sauce. You even went the extra mile and layered it with creamy chocolate ganache. I too have tried a few things to take the flavor of my cakes up a notch, but there’s one tip I slept on for too long: adding espresso powder.As a person who doesn’t care for coffee-flavored desserts, this not-so-secret ingredient never spoke to me. But recently, a couple of pro bakers informed me it would not make my cakes taste like a cafe mocha and inspired me to purchase my first jar. According to Joanne Lee Molinaro, author of The Korean Vegan, if your goal is to take a bite and say, “Wow, that’s the chocolatiest cake I’ve ever had!” you simply can’t skip the espresso. And keeping a stash of it in powdered form is the quickest, easiest, and cheapest way to get it.What exactly is espresso powder?Contrary to popular belief, espresso powder, a.k.a. instant espresso, isn't just ground coffee beans. It’s actually made from darkly roasted coffee beans that are ground, brewed into espresso, dried, and then ground even further to make a very fine dissolvable powder. Unlike instant coffee, which is made from dehydrated coffee, espresso powder is much more concentrated and lends a
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You know that glorious feeling when you emerge from the ocean, trot back to your beach chair, and snuggle up in your towel like it’s a big ol’ blanket? Or after you’ve had a refreshing shower in a hotel bathroom, and you wrap yourself up in a fluffy white towel and flop on the bed to watch some TV, only to fall asleep in its cozy comfort? What if I told you that you could channel those experiences in your own home? Here’s how: bath sheets. If you’ve never heard of bath sheets before, I want to clarify that they’re not anything like the sheets on your bed, they’re actually just oversized bath towels. Okay, let me rephrase: they’re not just oversized bath towels—they’re the best investment you can make in bath linens, and they’ll completely upgrade your post-shower self-care routine. While the materials and construction of bath towels and bath sheets is the same, the magic lies in the size. Regular bath towels are approximately 30 inches by 58 inches, while bath sheets are approximately 40” by 65”. To give you a point of reference, a standard throw blanket size is 50” by 60”, so a bath sheet is basically the size of a throw blanket, except ultra-absorbent and made to cuddle you instead of your couch. For most of my life, I used regular bath towels. They dried me off, and that’s all I thought I needed. I inadvertently discovered I loved a bath sheet, though
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While pasta primavera can all too often seem like it’s stuck in the ’80s, the best versions highlight fresh quickly cooked spring vegetables bathed in a creamy—not claggy—sauce. And it turns out the primavera treatment is equally delicious when you swap the pasta for golden brown chicken cutlets. Think of the pearl onions, asparagus, and peas in this recipe only as a template—primavera means spring in Italian, so feel free to bring any and all of the season’s green vegetables into the mix. You can swap in fava beans, sugar snap peas, or even wild ramps. If you can’t find pearl onions (you want the frozen peeled ones), use chopped scallions or spring onions. One thing you really shouldn’t substitute here: the heavy cream. (Half-and-half will curdle when it mixes with the lemon juice in the pan sauce.) —Christian ReynosoAll products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through the retail links below, we earn an affiliate commission.Ingredients½cup all-purpose flour1½tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt, plus more½tsp. freshly ground black pepper, plus more2large skinless, boneless chicken breasts (about 1½ lb. total), patted dry¼cup plus 1 Tbsp. grapeseed or vegetable oil5oz. frozen pearl onions or 1½ cups coarsely chopped scallions (pale green and white parts only)5garlic cloves, thinly sliced½cup heavy cream½cup low-sodium chicken broth (Better Than Bouillon also works great here)⅓cup fresh lemon juice8oz. asparagus, woody ends trimmed, thinly sliced on a diagonal1¼cups shelled fresh peas (from about 1¼ lb. pods) or frozen peas1tsp. Dijon mustard½cup very coarsely chopped dill, dividedShaved Parmesan (for serving; optional)PreparationStep 1Whisk together ½ cup all-purpose flour, 1½ tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt, and ½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper in a medium bowl; set aside.Step 2Slice 2 large skinless, boneless chicken breasts (about 1½ lb. total), patted dry, on a cutting board in half lengthwise to create 4 cutlets. Working one at a time, gently pound each cutlet between 2 sheets of plastic wrap to about ½" thick. Transfer cutlets to reserved bowl of seasoned flour and toss to coat very well. Working one at a time, shake off excess flour and transfer cutlets to a plate.Step 3Heat ¼ cup grapeseed or vegetable oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Add 2 cutlets to pan and cook, undisturbed, until golden brown underneath, about 3 minutes. Turn cutlets over and cook until golden brown on other sides, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a platter or plates and repeat with remaining 2 cutlets.Step 4Remove pan from heat and carefully wipe out with a paper towel to remove most of the excess oil and browned bits. Add remaining 1 Tbsp. grapeseed or vegetable oil to pan and heat over medium. Add 5 oz. frozen pearl onions or 1½ cups coarsely chopped scallions (pale green and white parts only) and 5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced, and cook, stirring occasionally, until onions begin to turn translucent, about 4 minutes if using pearl onions or 2 minutes if using scallions. Add ½ cup heavy cream, ½ cup low-sodium chicken b
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Photo by Julia Gartland Furikake, the savory and salty Japanese seasoning for sprinkling on plain rice, merits an entire section even in Manhattan’s tiniest Japanese markets. And if you’ve tasted this Japanese condiment, you understand why: Furikake enlivens a plain bowl of steamed rice: Add some mayo and a fried egg and you can call it a meal. I relied heavily on furikake when I lived in a dorm room with just a rice cooker for making dinner. It transformed something that was mediocre at best (white rice) to something delicious and satisfying. Furikake tastes good on almost any savory food you can imagine; you’ll find yourself shaking it onto salad, popcorn, and soup. Since a whole industry seems to exist around store-bought furikake, you’d think it must be tricky to make at home; in fact, it’s as simple as mixing together ingredients and putting them in a jar. Since a whole industry seems to exist around furikake, you’d think it must be tricky to make at home; in fact, it’s a simple as mixing together ingredients and putting them in a jar. When you compose your own mix, you get to control what’s in it, and put in as much or as little each ingredient as you like. Most of the store-bought furikake contain M.S.G; even if health concerns surrounding M.S.G. have been disproven, I still consider it cheating to use it: The key ingredients of furikake are already intensely umami—they don’t need a synthetic boost, just a pinch of salt and sugar. If you really want to stock up on store-bought furikake, skip any that have additives or chemical preservatives. The two bestselling furikake rice seasonings on Amazon are JFC International Seasoning Furikake and Nori Fume Furikake Rice Seasoning from Ajishima Foods. Both contain a combination of sesame seeds, seaweed, salt, and sugar but Ajishima Foods’ furikake does contain additives like maltodextrin, disodium succinate, and disodium inosinate. Trader Joe’s also makes a wildly popular version—Nori Komi Furikake Japanese Multi-Purpose Seasoning—which retails for $2.49. The simplest versions of furikake include as few as two ingredients, usually dried fish and nori seaweed, but can contain much more. That might sound like a very fishy flavor, but it’s more salty and umami (think miso soup, not canned sardines). You’ll see furikake mixtures with bits of dried egg, shrimp, salmon roe, shiso, wasabi, and, in Hokkaido, even buttered potato (I doubt that last one is natural). They come in jars for shaking into your bowl and in packets that are meant to be mixed with rice for omusubi (rice balls). Making up your own furikake recipe is fun. If you can go to a Japanese grocery store, walk the aisles looking for anything dried and savory that might be good on rice. Take a peek in your cupboards for inspiration, too; if you want to add crushed Corn Fla
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I never saw much need for a vacuum sealer in my kitchen. Sure, hand-squeezing as much air as possible out of a zipper bag isn’t ideal and I’ve had leftovers fall victim to freezer burn a few more times than I’d like, but is a vacuum sealer worth the extra money and storage space? After hearing about the ease of use, savings, and in many cases, small footprint of modern vacuum sealers from experts, I’m convinced the answer is a resounding “yes.” I spoke with eight home cooks, chefs, recipe developers, and cookbook authors who couldn't stop talking about their favorite vacuum sealers. They're incredibly effective in keeping food fresh longer and compact
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Whether it’s a tiered tower or a little loaf, or basically a vehicle for frosting, cake is a wonderful way to celebrate someone. And on June 16, we’re celebrating dads.
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In Cheap Tricks we’ll help you make the most out of everyday supermarket staples. Today, how to make gulab jamun with pancake mix.One of the greatest delights of South Asian dessert fare is the gulab jamun. They’re syrupy, bite-sized fried treats, often gently perfumed by cardamom or rose water, and they’re a mainstay: Gulab jamun can be found sealed in sticky cans at South Asian grocery stores, at the end of Indian restaurants’ lunchtime buffets, or fresh-fried and swimming in thick sugar syrup at sweets shops. In my home, every occasion—potlucks, celebrations, family gatherings, Indian festivals—was always prefixed by my mom’s homemade gulab jamun. But the issue with making t
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Photo by JULIA GARTLAND. FOOD STYLIST: KATE BUCKENS. PR
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