log in
Photo by James Ransom Though brown in color, hojicha is actually a type of green tea made from the plant’s lower leaves, stalks, stems, and twigs. These components are charcoal-roasted in a ceramic pot over high heat, and sold either as a loose-leaf tea or ground into powder. Hojicha powder can be used easily in a number of applications as an extraordinary flavor element for both savory and sweet culinary ideas Though hojicha is roasted, doing so doesn’t change its green tea health benefits. Hojicha does have a lower caffeine content than matcha, which is a powder made from dried (and comparatively babied) young green tea leaves. For those with sensitivities to caffeine, a cup of matcha ingested at the wrong hour may lead to a sleepless night, so it might be time to switch to drinking hojicha at teatime and beyond. Hojicha also has an instantly pleasing smell that happens to make you feel good when you inhale. And that’s because there is some nifty science involved! “Hojicha produces an aroma from pyrazine,” explains Candice Ng, who works as the general manager at Stonemill Matcha in San Francisco, which sells hojicha grown in its birthplace of Kyoto, Japan. “This natural compound is produced during the roasting process,” she says. “Pyrazine can also be found in coffee and charred items like chicken on a grill. This aroma is known to help with relaxation, the same way the smell of roasted coffee does.” “Hojicha is steamed to prevent oxidation, then dried,” Ng adds. “This process helps maintain the sweetness of hojicha but doesn't necessarily lower the caffeine level, which is more likely due to the fact that hojicha comes from tea leaves and stems that already contain lower caffeine levels.” What does change significantly during the process of roasting hojicha is its aroma and flavor, maturing into something deep and nutty. Hojicha powder is a versatile and sophisticated ingredient to add to your baking and beverage arsenal. Stonemill Matcha uses the powder for a steamed hojicha latte, blended with horchata for a "hojichata," and stirred into yuzu lemonade for a hojicha Palmer. When it comes to baking, Ng recommends adding hojicha to desserts like ice cream, cookies, or chiffon cake. “Items that have a high fat content, like cream and butter, go well with hojicha powder, since the powder doesn't dissolve,” she advises. “You need fat to coat the gritty texture.” You also don't need to use much in order to get big, no-grit results—a package or tin of hojicha powder goes a long way. Try adding a tablespoon to your everyday dishes—perhaps your hard-boiled egg or noodle water, French toast batter, pudding, or anything you think could use some roasted magic. It may just end up being your new secret ingredient.
(read more)
Springy and light yet comforting and flavor-packed, this recipe takes its cues from avgolemono, a family of Greek soups (and sauces) in which broth is thickened with egg and lemon juice.  Eggs and lemon is a classic pair that's also common in Turkish, Balkan, Arab, Italian, and Sephardic Jewish cuisine, among others. Since a good deal of the flavor in the final dish comes from vegetable broth, you’ll want to make sure you’re using one that tastes good to you: Homemade is ideal, but when that’s not possible, I like Better Than Bouillon. You can also use cartons of broth from the store o
(read more)
In this beef tenderloin roast recipe, the meat is seasoned with a garlic and rosemary paste then seared in a cast-iron skillet (we like this one), and finished in a low oven. High-heat searing builds deep flavor by browning the well-seasoned exterior, while low-temperature (250°) roasting creates an evenly-cooked juicy interior with little risk of overcooking. It’s truly the best of both worlds. But it gets even better when you top off these thick slices of medium-rare beef with a tangy horseradish yogurt, a drizzle of rosemary infused butter, and a hearty sprinkle of salt. Luxurious as is,
(read more)
Photo by Ty Mecham You’re probably wondering, are adult easter baskets even a thing? I’m here to tell you that they absolutely are—or can be—because it’s 2021 and the sky’s the limit. If you’re in the mood to send some gifts, why not throw together a nice little basket of treats for your friend, sibling, or significant other who has fond memories of Easter egg hunts? This can do double-duty in overriding their less-than-fond memories of some terrifying person in a bunny costume, too. As with all gift baskets, the best adult Easter basket ideas revolve loosely around some kind of theme. Fancy candy (I mean, it is Easter, after all), lots of nostalgia, delicate home accessories, and a coterie of condiments are all decidedly adult, but no less exciting to open than the baskets you received as a child. Sound good? Here are four ideas to get you started: First of all, there’s nothing wrong with Peeps and Creme Eggs. But if you want that Easter basket to be, well, a bit more adult, consider some fancy chocolates and sweet treats. There are four chocolate flavors available in this Daily Dose Chocolate Pack, and the bite-size bars are made from unroasted cacao beans (sustainably sourced, too). Balance out the sweet stuff with sour gummy bunnies—or for someone particularly adventurous, try Danish liquorice. Throw it back to some preferred childhood Easter activities with an egg coloring & grass growing kit, which is technically for kids, but contains pastel-toned non toxic dyes made from plant extracts and is a fun activity no matter how old you are. A mason jar indoor flower garden will bring some spring garden vibes to even the smallest of apartments—you can grow chamomile, pansies, or zinnias using just this kit, water, and sunshine. For the ultimate nostalgic touch, add some Peter Rabbit chocolates. If you know someone who celebrates with a traditional Easter meal, they’ll be all set with the recipes—so go for some more decorative gifts. You can’t
(read more)
Head to your kitchen and end up in Mexico, thanks to Mely Martínez, longtime blogger and author of the recent cookbook The Mexican Home Kitchen: Traditional Home-Style Recipes That Capture the Flavors and Memories of Mexico. Get to know Mely in the excerpt below—delicious recipes included. My mom used to say that I was born with one foot already in the street. She was referring to my penchant for getting out of the house to go visit my friends, aunts, and neighbors around town. For some reason, since a very young age, I liked to go out and visit other people’s houses, hoping that they would invite me in to eat some of their food. My mother completely disapproved of this, as she was afraid that people would begin to think that we didn’t have any food at home! The reason I loved doing this was because I always wanted to try new flavors. I always wondered why things like sopa de fideo would taste different from one house to the other, or why some people would add lime juice to their soup and others wouldn’t. So many of these questions about food and how it was prepared often kept my mind busy, and to this day, I still think about food constantly. I come from a large family, and am the second child in a family of five girls and three boys. As with many families back then, the older siblings were introduced to household chores at a very young age, and that included buying groceries at the market and helping out in the kitchen. In the summertime, my mom used to send my siblings and me to my grandma’s house, which was on a ranch along the Pánuco River in the state of Veracruz. We always saw those trips as fun times; there was so much to do there during the long days of summer. Even though there was no electricity and toys, my siblings and cousins always found ways to have fun. Our afternoon pastimes included playing hide-and-seek and sticking chicken feathers into the top of a dried corncob so we could spin it in the air like a helicopter. Most of the morning-to-midday hours at the farm were spent cooking. It was a process that involved all the women in the family, each with a specific job in the kitchen. One would be preparing the salsa in the molcajete, another would be grinding the masa on the metate, and another would be making the tortillas while my grandma was cooking the main dishes. My job was to grind the corn in the manual corn grinder. Sometimes, my grandma would send one of my cousins and me to deliver lunch to the men in the family, who were working in the fields. The lunch would often consist of a batch of freshly made corn tortillas, each folded and stuffed with scrambled eggs in a spicy salsa. They would be in a pile and tied up in a bundle with a kitchen napkin, almost as if it were a gift. To drink would be coffee with raw milk, carried in an aguardiente glass bottle closed with a small piece of corncob. Though simple, those egg-in-salsa tacos were absolutely delicious. They were made with eggs that my grandma collected from the hens early in the morning and tomatoes and p
(read more)
As someone who is both a food editor and lifelong video game enthusiast, I've predictably played a ton of food-themed games. Over the last year, games have kept me excellent company, serving as a satisfying and consistent way to pass what I'll refer to as "time." I revisited the food-centric games I previously loved, like Stardew Valley, Overcooked, the eerily realistic Cooking Simulator, and every last Cooking Mama. I've cooked my way through Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Final Fantasy XV (whose food imagery is stunning), and World of Warcraft. But when I popped recent release Sakuna: Of Rice & Ruin into my Switch a few months ago, I felt genuinely connected to the food I was interacting with on the screen for the first time. In this farming, friend-feeding, and enemy-pummeling role-playing game, rice is king, and you happen to live on a paddy. Oh, and you've never grown rice before. Additionally, you're a harvest goddess coming down from quite the hot mess of a sake bender (see: "& Ruin"), so the stakes are pretty high. Rice plays an essential role in the progression of the game, to the extent that I can no longer cook my favorite grain in any form without first studying it for the primary attributes in the game—hardness, polish, and aesthetic—and when it's cooked, for its stickiness and aroma. Every minute decision you make in the paddy influences the quality of the final yield, from the time of day you plant meticulous rows of seedlings to the precise percentage of water in the field during growth cycles (taking the rain into account, of course), to the weather when you thresh and hull the kernels. Responsible stewardship of a bucolic rice paddy on a serene albeit demon-infested island means balancing farming with advancing the main story. And to do it without the rice you've grown and eaten is a fool's errand, because eating rice (and food items made with rice, like congee, dumplings, mochi, vinegar for pickles, and your beloved sake) is the only way to strengthen yourself enough to battle the never-ending supply of meat in the form of crazed rabbits, sparrows, and boars impeding your path to glory. Staying on top of weed-pulling, bug-plucking, fertilizer cultivation, and the delicate balance of flooding and draining the paddy will all contribute to a favorable harvest, boost your farming skills, and propel you along the storyline. It's not just the meticulous tending of the field that connected me in a distinctive way to the rice I was growing. Once harvested and dried, it's on you, as manually as can be expressed with a Switch controller in each hand, to take up a traditional threshing tool known as a kokibashi and pull each stalk through to remove the kernels. Prepare for some repetitive motion that is not altogether unpleasant and definitely gives a sense of satisfaction once complete, and more of the same if you choose to polish off the hull by pounding it in a mortar to produce white rice (although, as in real life, brown rice has its own set of advantages). I usually play one season at a time, from planti
(read more)
Those canned chickpeas in the back of your cupboard could be doing so much more than just taking up space. Instead, use them in this simple no-fail hummus recipe. Chickpeas are whizzed in a food processor (shout-out to this one!) with the good stuff—tahini, garlic, lemon juice, olive oil, and spices. Thinned with just enough water to get it light yet creamy, it works as a versatile dip or condiment: This rich, tangy hummus is as great swooped around the edge of your grain bowl as it is smeared on crusty sourdough or stealing the limelight on your next snack platter.Serve as is or topped with any number of different things, including lamb or chicken, good olive oil and flaky sea salt, pine
(read more)
Welcome to Yi Jun Lo's Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring seven staples stocking Jun's Malaysian kitchen. "Malaysia, Truly Asia." It’s the singsong slogan my country is known for, blared in our travel ads across the world, with scenes of brilliant blue seas and dew-dropped rainforest accompanying the tune. While lush greenery and picture-perfect beaches are what many think of when it comes to the country, I’ve always thought they don’t show off just how "truly Asian" Malaysia is. To me, there’s no better example than our food. It’s whe
(read more)
Spend just five minutes on Instagram or Tiktok (or really, browsing any design site you love) and you’ll probably realize that cottagecore, the semi-new social media trend du jour, isn’t going anywhere. I mean, when Taylor Swift writes not one but two albums that are pretty much singularly evocative of the vibe, you know it has staying power. And while sure, some examples of cottagecore can veer towards crunchy for some, there's a lot to love about this easygoing, comfortable design trend. At its essence, cottagecore style is all about casual liveability. Like farmhouse decor before it, you can expect to see an emphasis on simplicity and ease, with nods to th
(read more)
All products featured on Bon Appétit are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.Healthyish Loves It is our weekly column where we tell you about the stuff we can't live without. See our past recommendations here!Executive editor Sonia Chopra, presumably on a caffeine high, plunged the BA “office” into heated debate with this controversial Slack: “After 11 months of being extremely picky about coffee and spending most of my disposable income on beans, I am here to admit that I’m obsessed with the new pistachio brown butter Starbucks latte.”“I want it,” agreed Basically editor Sarah Jam
(read more)
The only thing better than a good recipe? When something's so easy to make that you don't even need one. Welcome to It's That Simple, a column where we talk you through the process of making the dishes and drinks we can make with our eyes closed.My youngest sister recently reminded me that our paternal grandmother, who we called Mader (mother in Dari), kept a specific journal filled with some of her special yogurt-based recipes, ranging from mint-scented cucumber raita to pumpkin borani. Borani is a cold dish composed of a roasted or sautéed vegetable paired with thick, creamy yogurt, often adorned with spices, nuts, fried onions, fresh herbs, and olive oil. Cooked and beloved in Afghanist
(read more)