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Whether or not related to the absence of former President Donald J. Trump, a bipartisan lightness seemed to prevail across the inaugural stage.Credit...Amr Alfiky/The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021, 8:01 p.m. ET“This is a great nation. We are good people,” Mr. Biden said, speaking in simple goals, sounding almost plaintive at times in his 21-minute address. “We can see each other not as adversaries but as neighbors.” He called upon a nation of citizens to renew its vows of dignity, respect and common purpose.“We can join forces, stop the shouting and lower the temperature,” Mr. Biden said.Mr. Biden’s words did not so much ring triumphant as they conjured a sense of respite. The center had held and the system had survived, at least this time. “On this hallowed ground where just a few days ago violence sought to shake the capital’s very foundation,” the new president said, “we come together as one nation under God, indivisible, to carry out the peaceful transfer of power as we have for more than two centuries.”Shorter version: “Phew.”ImageCredit...Erin Schaff/The New York TimesImageCredit...Chang W. Lee/The New York TimesImageCredit...Ruth Fremson/The New York TimesThe ceremony was brisk both in temperature and in pace. No one shied away from the discord of the recent past. It would have been impossible in any case as remnants of the assault were everywhere: broken windows, dislodged signs and closed-off corridors inside the Capitol.Eugene Goodman, a Capitol Police officer credited with diverting rioters from the Senate floor, was introduced to a somber standing ovation from the socially distanced crowd after he escorted the incoming Vice President Kamala Harris onto the inaugural stage.After Lady Gaga performed “The Star-Spangled Banner,” she and the new president shared a halting salutation, both seemingly unsure of the proper way to approach fellow eminence in these uncertain times.“This is the first inauguration in the history of America where J. Lo was the warm-up act for Chief Justice Roberts,” said Senator Amy Klobuchar, Democrat of Minnesota, who served as the de facto master of ceremonies.The observance evoked a mood of some relief that democracy had indeed triumphed, though not without some anxious moments. There were tributes to the “peaceful transfer of power” along with ever-present reminders that this one hardly was.“We’ve learned again that democracy is precious,” Mr. Biden said. “Democracy is fragile. And at this hour, my friends, democracy has prevailed.”Even without the presence of Mr. Trump, perhaps the most striking mark of his legacy was the weary capital he left to his successor. Mr. Biden’s inauguration was the most fortified such gathering in Washington’s history.Helicopters pulsing over the city are never a reassuring sign. Neither are black fences, concrete barriers or the swelling ranks of National Guard troops that proliferated across town in recent days — some 25,000 strong in total, five times the number of American forces stationed in Iraq and Afghanistan.ImageCredit...Jason Andrew for The New York TimesThe few who ventured near the Capitol were mostly somber, a
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New York|3 Die in National Guard Helicopter Crash Near RochesterThe helicopter, which was on a routine training mission, crashed in a field. The cause of the accident is under investigation.Credit...Ryan Koller, via 13WHAMJan. 20, 2021Updated 9:56 p.m. ETA New York Army National Guard Black Hawk helicopter on a routine training mission crashed in a rural area south of Rochester on Wednesday evening, leaving three Guard members dead, the authorities said.It was not immediately clear what caused the aircraft, a UH-60 medical evacuation helicopter, to crash. Sheriff Todd K. Baxter of Monroe Count
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Joe Biden’s declaration in his inauguration speech that democracy was the real winner of the presidential election has been used by many newspapers to mark his accession to the Oval Office.Along with several other titles, the Guardian employs a poster front page featuring a picture of the president making his speech on the steps of the Capitol alongside the headline: “Democracy has prevailed”.The normally typographically conservative Financial Times also goes with a huge picture of Biden and the same headline.The Scotsman’s front page is one picture of Biden and it splashes a longer ex
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U.S.|Scorning Biden, protesters in Portland, Ore., and Seattle called for more radical change.Jan. 20, 2021, 7:00 p.m. ETJan. 20, 2021, 7:00 p.m. ETMike Baker and Hallie GoldenCredit...Lindsey Wasson/ReutersIn Portland, Ore., and Seattle, protesters marched through the downtown areas on Wednesday carrying signs opposing the police, immigration authorities and government in general, and some people in each city vandalized buildings symbolizing institutional power.In Portland, about 200 people clad in black marched to the local Democratic headquarters, where some of them smashed windows and tipped over garbage containers, lighting the contents of one on fire.Those who took to the streets on Wednesday said they were a mix of anarchists, anti-fascists and racial justice protesters. One of their signs said, “We don’t want Biden — we want revenge” for killings committed by police officers and “fascist massacres.”In a city that has seen months of demonstrations over racial injustice, economic inequality, federal law enforcement and corporate power — and some of the harshest law enforcement responses to such protests — protesters have vowed to continue their actions no matter who is president. “We are ungovernable,” one sign in the crowd said.In Seattle, about 150 people marched with large banners that said “Abolish ICE, no cops, prisons, borders, presidents.” Some spray-painted buildings with an anarchist symbol and broke windows, including at a federal courthouse.Seattle police officers followed the group and began to surround it as night fell.In Portland, police officers scuffled with protesters before the march began. Later, they made some arrests.ImageCredit...Lindsey Wasson/ReutersAt a separate demonstration in Portland, people gathered to hear speakers who celebrated former President Donald J. Trump’s departure but called for continued pressure for government action.“The fight has just begun,” said Ray Austin, 25. He said the damage done by Mr. Trump could not be undone by the likes of President Biden and that the nation needed a groundswell of people demanding more.Speakers at the event called for the Green New Deal to fight climate change, a “Medicare for All”-style health insurance system, overhauls of police departments to address racial disparities and other fundamental changes.
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The first press briefing by Biden administration press secretary Jen Psaki highlighted how much changed overnight in the White House. There were no angry outbursts. No insults. No conspiracy theories pushed from the briefing room lectern. Just civil, if largely unmemorable, exchanges with reporters. That Psaki didn’t break a lot of policy news is understandable, given that she just started at her job hours earlier. What was significant, however, is the approach she took toward reporters. “I have deep respect for the role of a free and independent press in our democracy, and for the role all of you play,” Psaki, who was a State Department spokesperson in the Obama years, said in response to the first question she fielded. “As I noted earlier, there will be moments when we disagree, and there will certainly be days where we disagree for extensive parts of the briefing even, perhaps. But we have a common goal, which is sharing accurate information with the American people.” Zeke Miller gets the first question during a Biden-era press briefing. It's about whether Jen Psaki sees her role as "promoting the interests of the president or are you here to provide truth." Psaki replies by saying she respects the media. No insults. No meltdowns. pic.twitter.com/J3ADgL9uuT— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) January 21, 2021 Psaki’s first briefing stood in the starkest possible contrast with the first one held under President Donald Trump in January 2017. That memorable event, held the day after Trump’s inauguration, was a surreal affair in which press secretary Sean Spicer angrily denounced reporters for accurately covering the relative smallness of Trump’s inaugural crowd size. With Sean Spicer back in the news today, a flashback to the moment when it became clear that the Trump administration was going to be the stuff of dystopian novels pic.twitter.com/in80iC7OQ1— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) September 17, 2019 Spicer’s outburst set the tone for the next four years, during which White House briefings were more like professional wrestling events than they were good-faith efforts to inform the American public. It often felt like their goal was to put on a spectacle where White House officials asserted dominance over reporters. Psaki seems poised to make the briefings more like they were in the Obama years, when, for better or worse, the general public rarely took notice. While Psaki took pains to avoid rebuking Trump or any of the four press secretaries who worked for him, she did allude to the sad state of press relations during those years by promising to bring “truth and transparency back to the briefing room.” Most of the questions she fielded on Wednesday came from reporters who asked her about Biden’s plans or what her approach to being press secretary would be, but she did at one point respond artfully to a question from a Fox News reporter who asked her a leading question about whether President Joe Biden should discourage the Senate from holding a second impeachment trial for Trump now that he’s out of office. “The Senate can also multitask,” she said, arguing that senators could hold a trial while still addressin
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White House press secretary Jen Psaki brushed dust off the podium in the briefing room on Wednesday evening, holding the first press conference of the Biden era just hours after he was inaugurated as the 46th president. “When the president asked me to serve in this role, we talked about the importance of bringing truth and transparency back to the briefing room,” Psaki said of President Joe Biden. “There will be times where we see things differently in this room … that’s OK. That’s part of our democracy, and rebuilding trust with the American people will be central to our focus in the press office and in the White House every single day.” The press briefing, a normal feature of almost every modern administration, nonetheless represented a firm break with the lack of transparency under former President Donald Trump. Trump and his press secretaries regularly battled and attacked the media from the briefing room, if they appeared at all. The administration often went months without any senior officials appearing behind the podium. Former White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany’s final briefing — shortly after the deadly insurrection at the Capitol — lasted only a minute before she left without answering questions. Psaki pledged that her tenure would be different. She said she would hold regularly briefings every weekday and that the Biden administration would ensure health officials delivered addresses to the media and the American public on a frequent basis. The White House is the People’s House, so I'm asking for YOU to reply with your questions. I'll answer you in a video this week. Can't wait to hear from you!— Jen Psaki (@PressSec) January 20, 2021 “[I recognize] the power of this podium and the power of truth and the importance of truth and setting the example of engagement and transparency,” Psaki said, later addressing the spread of misinformation under Trump and how the Biden administration would work to combat it. “I think there are a number of ways to combat misinformation; one of them is accurate information and truth and data and sharing information even when it is hard to hear,” she said. Biden quickly got to work on Wednesday afternoon, signing a bevy of executive orders to reverse many Trump-era policies and enable the U.S. to rejoin the Paris Climate Accord and the World Health Organization. The president also instituted a mask mandate on federal property, rescinded the permit for the Keystone XL pipeline and began instituting plans to protect undocumented immigrants and to allow people from banned Muslim-majority nations to enter the U.S. again. “We’re not wasting any time,” Psaki said. Every senior communications role in the Biden administration will be held by a woman, the first time all of those positions will be filled by female officials. The president has pledged to make his Cabinet and leadership team reflective of America and has already moved to fill senior positions with barrier-breaking appointees. Vice President Kamala Harris has already broken barriers in her own right. She is the first female vice president and the first Black and the Asian American vice president. Psa
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Books|A Boy Who Bonded With Biden Over Stuttering Will Write a Children’s BookBrayden Harrington, 13, who spoke at the Democratic National Convention, will write a picture book, “Brayden Speaks Up,” HarperCollins announced.Credit...Andrew Harnik/Associated PressJan. 20, 2021Updated 8:56 p.m. ETThey bonded nearly a year ago after Joseph R. Biden Jr. bent down to greet Brayden Harrington, a 13-year-old boy who stutters, at a campaign stop in New Hampshire.“Don’t let it define you,” Mr. Biden said, squeezing Brayden’s shoulder and looking him in the eye. “You are smart as hell.”Months later, Brayden spoke at the Democratic National Convention, a remarkable display of bravery a
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Read: A sermon in America’s civic religionAfter all, despite Trump’s gilded decorative tastes, the last inauguration was a bleak nightmare defined by the word carnage and the groans of 3 Doors Down. By contrast, the 2021 inauguration might persist in the public memory as a whirl of fun fashions: the regal purple of the coat swishing around Kamala Harris; the dusk-hour burgundy of Michelle Obama’s pantsuit; the kitschy zigzags of Bernie Sanders’s mittens; the craftwork sparkles on Ella Emhoff’s shoulders; the glimpse of Dior sneakers behind Amy Klobuchar as she speechified. The event was a musical extravaganza too. Americans know the songs of their patriotic canon plenty well, but t
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Helicopters that have for decades taken to the skies of New Zealand every year to search for cannabis-growing operations will stay on the ground this year amid a shift in policing priorities.Light aircraft and helicopters have mounted aerial surveillance operations searching for the banned class C drug since the 1970s, but police now say their resources could be better deployed, particularly in the fight against methamphetamine, known locally as P.The cost of the annual surveillance operations is unknown, but is thought to be at least a million dollars a year.A police spokesperson said: “With the increased harm in many communities arising from other drugs, particularly methamphetamine, a o
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Sen. Bernie Sanders’s presence at President Joe Biden’s inauguration did more than signal his support of Biden after a hard-fought 2020 presidential campaign. It proved that while Biden may have triumphed as the “relatable Everyman” from coast to coast, Bernie remains the “relatable Everyman” of the internet. Clad in a bulky brown overcoat (immortalized in the “I Am Once Again Asking You” campaign video), Bernie spawned memes that proliferated across social media throughout Inauguration Day. He did so purely by showing up and being himself — looking kinda cranky, dressed-down, tired, and world-weary. Basically, he encapsulated many Americans’ moods after the cascading
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Lots of things are better than a colorful president.Jan. 20, 2021, 7:56 p.m. ETCredit...Pete Marovich for The New York TimesI don’t know how Donald Trump was imagining his inauguration morning departure from Washington. Sure, he managed to fly out of town on Air Force One — still president! — but it was a pretty pathetic send-off for a guy who spent his whole political career bragging about the size of his crowds.Close to depressing, actually. Mike Pence and Mitch McConnell weren’t there to wave goodbye — too busy preparing to hang out with Joe Biden on Capitol Hill. A very modest cluster of supporters arrived and cheered when he promised, “We will be back in some form.”Feel fr
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As Joe Biden sat down the Oval Office on Wednesday, just hours after being sworn in as the 46th president of the United States, it was clear more had changed in the room than the administration.Biden revealed some new decor as he invited reporters into his new office to watch him sign a stack of executive orders.Donald Trump’s portrait of Andrew Jackson – the censured and fellow populist 19th-century president – was replaced with Benjamin Franklin, meant to signal Biden’s interest in science, according to the Washington Post. Other intentional changes include a portrait of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and paired paintings of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton – representing two
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On his first day in office, President Joe Biden issued an executive order strengthening anti-discrimination protections for the LGBTQ community, marking a quick turnaround from Trump administration policy. Under the new executive guidance, federal agencies are to assume that laws forbidding discrimination apply to sexual orientation and gender identity, not just race, religion, sex and national origin. The measure was part of a slew of orders Biden signed shortly after his swearing-in, as both a substantive and a symbolic rebuke of the Trump era. The order suggests that enforcement agencies under Biden will be open to pursuing discrimination complaints on behalf of LGBTQ people in a way the Trump administration was not. The Human Rights Campaign called it “the most substantive, wide-ranging executive order concerning sexual orientation and gender identity” ever issued by a U.S. president. “Today, millions of Americans can breathe a sigh of relief knowing that their President and their government believe discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity is not only intolerable but illegal,” the advocacy group’s president, Alphonso David, said in a statement. The Supreme Court issued a landmark decision last June ruling that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects workers from discrimination related to sexual orientation and gender identity. But that ruling applies explicitly to discrimination in the workplace, whereas Biden’s executive order makes clear the safeguards extend to other areas like housing and education. In a fact sheet released Wednesday, the Biden administration said the new order will “build on” the protections cemented by the Supreme Court. “All persons should receive equal treatment under the law, no matter their gender identity or sexual orientation,” the White House said in a statement. The Trump administration had urged the Supreme Court to rule that gay and transgender workers were not covered by Title VII, and after the ruling came down this past summer, the Trump administration tried to limit its reach.  The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that the Justice Department’s civil rights div
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Mind|Is Mask-Slipping the New Manspreading?Something about some men just makes it difficult to keep that mask where it should be.Credit...Getty ImagesJan. 20, 2021, 7:44 p.m. ETWhen I saw Bill Clinton’s mask slip below his nose during the inaugural festivities, I figured, well, it could happen to any of us.But then John Roberts’s mask was not entirely covering his nose at different points.ImageCredit...Getty ImagesAnd even Barack Obama’s mask dipped below the tip of his nose at one point.A couple months back, then-President Trump’s economic adviser Larry Kudlow was spotted outside the West Wing with his mask down.ImageCredit...Getty ImagesI realized it’s not a Democratic thing. Or a Republican thing. Or an inaugural thing.It’s a male thing. It’s like manspreading, but with masks. Call it manslipping.Experts continually remind us that to protect ourselves and others against the coronavirus, a mask should cover your face, from the bridge of your nose to under your chin. But too many of us are letting our masks slip.Women wear masks too, and of course they sometimes slip. But I see a lot more man slippage. I see it not only in news coverage, but in grocery stores and on the street.It’s not all men, of course. But then, not all men take up two or three subway seats. S
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7.45pm EST 19:45 Treating severely ill Covid-19 patients with the arthritis drug tocilizumab has no clinical benefit, according to the results of a trial stopped early due to an increase in deaths among those receiving it, AFP reports: The trial, published Thursday in the BMJ medical journal, appeared to contradict earlier studies in which tocilizumab seemed to show promise in reducing the length of hospital stays for some patients. The drug, a common treatment for arthritis, blocks a specific part of the body’s immune system that can go into overdrive in serious and critical Covid-19 cases. It had been hoped that the treatment could help to tamp down some of the more extreme inflammatory responses that can lead to death. Researchers in Brazil conducted a randomised control trial among 129 patients with confirmed Covid-19 at nine hospitals. 7.24pm EST 19:24 Joe Biden signs executive orders on pandemic Sam Levine Joe Biden has marked the start of his presidency by signing a flurry of executive orders on a suite of issues, including Covid-19, the environment, immigration and ethics. Some of the executive actions undo significant actions from Donald Trump’s administration, including halting the travel ban from Muslim-majority countries, and ending the declaration of a national emergency used to justify funding construction of a wall on the US-Mexico border. He also signed an order allowing the United States to rejoin the Paris climate agreement and end the Trump administration’s efforts to exclude undocumented immigrants from the census data used to determine how many seats in Congress each state gets. The president also moved quickly to address Covid-19, signing orders to mandate mask wearing and social distancing in federal buildings and lands and to create a position of a Covid-19 response coordinator: 7.14pm EST 19:14 Covid cases may have stopped falling, major English survey shows Ian Sample Cases of coronavirus may no longer be falling across England, according to a major survey that raises concerns over whether lockdown measures can contain the new variant, as the UK reported a record daily number of deaths.
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U.S.|A.S.L. Interpreter Who Gave Coronavirus Updates Dies of Covid-19 ComplicationsPatty Sakal worked as an interpreter in Hawaii for nearly 40 years before her death on Jan. 15.Credit...via Sakal familyJan. 20, 2021, 7:42 p.m. ETPatty Sakal, an American Sign Language interpreter who translated updates about the coronavirus for deaf Hawaiians, died on Friday of complications related to Covid-19. She was 62.Ms. Sakal, who lived in Honolulu, died at Alvarado Hospital Medical Center in San Diego, where she had gone last month to visit one of her daughters, according to Ms. Sakal’s sister, Lorna Mouton Riff.Ms. Sakal, who worked as an A.S.L. interpreter for nearly four decades in a variety of settings, had become a mainstay in coronavirus press briefings in Hawaii, working with both the former mayor of Honolulu, Kirk Caldwell, and Gov. David Y. Ige to interpret news for the deaf community.In a statement, Isle Interpret, an organization of interpreters to which Ms. Sakal belonged, called Ms. Sakal “Hawaii interpreter ‘royalty.’”This was in part because Ms. Sakal understood Hawaiian Sign Language, a version of American Sign Language developed by deaf elders to which she had been exposed while growing up.“She was highly utilized and highly desired by the deaf in the community because they could understand her so well and she could understand them,” said Tamar Lani, the president of Isle Interpret.Ms. Sakal was born on Feb. 24, 1958, in Honolulu to Hershel Mouton and Georgia Morikawa, who were both deaf. Her father was the first deaf teacher at the Hawaii School of the Deaf and Blind in Honolulu, and her mother was a prominent political activist on behalf of the deaf community, which included participating in the early drafting of the Americans With Disabilities Act, Ms. Riff said.“We grew up at a time when there were no interpreters,” Ms. Riff said, “so if you were a child of deaf parents, you automatically became your parents’ interpreter.”Ms. Sakal turned this experience into a career as a professional A.S.L. interpreter. In her time in the job, she interpreted in all kinds of settings, including theater, legal, medical and educational, accord
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Credit...Damon Winter/The New York TimesOpinionThe new president called for comity. Can the country heed it?Credit...Damon Winter/The New York TimesThe Editorial BoardThe editorial board is a group of opinion journalists whose views are informed by expertise, research, debate and certain longstanding values. It is separate from the newsroom.Jan. 20, 2021Joe Biden began his presidency on Wednesday with the same animating philosophy that guided his campaign: The center can hold.That’s a big wager. American society is more brittle now than it has been in years. It is unequal, unhealthy and politically radicalized. A pandemic is raging nearly unchecked. The economy is in tatters. The climate is in crisis. Residents of red and blue America can’t even agree on the reality before their eyes,
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As President Joe Biden was sworn into office Wednesday, a uniformed man was seen paying silent tribute at the grave of Biden’s son Beau.  Delaware News Journal reporter Patricia Talorico captured the poignant image, showing the man kneeling with head bowed by Beau Biden’s grave at St. Joseph on the Brandywine church in Greenville, Delaware. Talorico, who writes primarily about food, said she was on an assignment to see how Delaware was commemorating the incoming administration when she spotted the man. At the same time, she had her car radio set to CNN and noted that Biden was about to begin his inaugural address.   “I couldn’t bring myself to interrupt this poignant, solemn moment,” she later wrote. “I took some photos from a distance, and pulled my car over to a nearby
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WASHINGTON (AP) — Three new senators were sworn into office Wednesday after President Joe Biden's inauguration, securing the majority for Democrats in the Senate and across a unified government to tackle the new president's agenda at a time of unprecedented national challenges. In a first vote, the Senate confirmed Biden's nominee for Director of National Intelligence, Avril Haines. Senators worked into the evening and overcame some Republican opposition to approve his first Cabinet member, in what's traditionally a show of good faith on Inauguration Day to confirm at least some nominees for a new president's administration. Haines, a former CIA deputy director, will become a core member of Biden’s security team, overseeing the 18 agencies that make up the nation’s intelligence community. She was confirmed 84-10. The new Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., urged colleagues to turn the spirit of the new president’s call for unity into action. “President Biden, we heard you loud and clear,” Schumer said in his first . “We have a lengthy agenda. And we need to get it done together.” Vice President Kamala Harris drew applause as she entered the chamber to
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Revenues for the Trump Organization fell nearly 38 percent in 2020 as the coronavirus took a steep toll on the hospitality industry. Mar-a-Lago was a bright spot.Credit...Scott McIntyre for The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021, 7:22 p.m. ETOver the past year, former President Donald J. Trump’s family business suffered steep declines in revenue as the pandemic upended the nation’s hospitality industry, according to a financial disclosure report released hours after Mr. Trump departed office on Wednesday.The report detailed a revenue drop of more than 40 percent at Mr. Trump’s Doral golf club outside Miami, and a 63 percent decline at his signature hotel in Washington, just blocks from the White House. All told, the Trump Organization declared revenue of at least $278 million in 2020 and the early days of this year, a nearly 38 percent decline from the company’s reported 2019 results.The disclosure, which represents the final public snapshot of Mr. Trump’s finances, documents the toll the pandemic has taken on his luxury hospitality business, which essentially ground to a halt last spring when the coronavirus started sweeping through the country. Trump hotels and golf courses shuttered, and even after reopening, some faced restrictions on indoor dining and gatherings.“There were places that due to government mandates we were not able to operate,” Eric Trump, the former president’s son who helps run the business, said in an interview on Wednesday. “Those are places you are going to lose the season because of it.”The Trump Organization, he said, remained stable and had steady cash flow and relatively low debt compared with other real estate businesses — thoug
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Newly inaugurated President Joe Biden on Wednesday extended moratoriums on evictions and foreclosures during the COVID-19 pandemic, ensuring that millions of Americans can stay in their homes during the global health crisis.  Biden’s press secretary Jen Psaki announced that the president will work with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to extend the federal eviction moratorium though March 31. Additionally, he will work with the Departments of Veterans Affairs, Agriculture, and Housing and Urban Development to extend the foreclosure moratoriums through March 31.  “The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered an almost unprecedented housing affordability crisis,” Psaki said during a White House briefing on Wednesday evening. Biden “took immediate action to confront the crisis and asked relevant agencies to extend nationwide moratoriums on evictions and foreclosures.” Since the coronavirus hit the U.S. last year, millions of Americans have been on the brink of homelessness as unemployment skyrocketed to historic levels. Somewhere between 12 million and 17 million households — or up to 40 million people — have little or no confidence that they can pay their upcoming rent and avoid eviction if they don’t receive government relief, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition. Renters and homeowners facing eviction have been covered by a hodgepodge of government assistance, but at times it hasn’t been enough. There have been multip
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As he promised, President Joe Biden spent the first day of his term walking back Donald Trump’s legacy and establishing a new order through a flurry of executive actions.  He signed 17 in total, more than half of which reversed a Trump-era policy. Here is the full list: The “100 Days Masking Challenge” In a 180-degree pivot from Trump’s dismissal of the most basic coronavirus safety measures, Biden is asking all Americans to commit to 100 days of mask-wearing. While Biden doesn’t have the power to mandate such a thing at the state or local level, this executive action will require
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The old maxim that ‘no good deed goes unpunished’ appeared to be proved true once more on Wednesday when, a week after allowing itself to be used as a Covid-19 vaccination centre, Newbury racecourse was subjected to strongly worded criticism on social media for a one-day return to its day job. Course officials insisted that the NHS had planned around the track’s long-established fixture list and that the racing which took place here on Wednesday did not cause a delay to the vaccination process but hecklers on Twitter appeared reluctant to accept that point.In an apparent attempt to pleas
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President Joe Biden rescinded former President Donald Trump’s travel ban on several Muslim-majority countries, fulfilling his pledge to Muslim and immigrant advocacy groups and allowing families to reunite in the U.S. after years apart.  The executive order was among many signed on Wednesday, his first day in office. Nearly four years ago, Trump issued an executive order limiting entry for people from seven Muslim-majority nations, a follow-up to his campaign promise of “a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States.” After Trump signed his order, thousands of peo
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Vice President Kamala Harris’s husband has to define the job to suit himself — and to alter perceptions of the high-profile political spouse.Credit...Erin Schaff/The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021, 7:08 p.m. ETWASHINGTON — Douglas Emhoff, the husband of Vice President Kamala Harris and the first second gentleman, visited the Library of Congress this month for what he called some “homework” on his new role. He learned of the story from a century ago of Lois Marshall, then the second lady in a Democratic administration, and Grace Coolidge, the incoming second lady in a Republican administration.Mrs. Coolidge was nervous on her way to Washington, unfamiliar with the city and its culture. But Mrs. Marshall was there to greet her at the train station when she arrived, said Meg McAleer, a
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The president also canceled the Keystone XL pipeline and ordered federal agencies to begin the process of reinstating environmental regulations reversed under the Trump administration.Credit...Doug Mills/The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021Updated 7:06 p.m. ETWASHINGTON — President Joseph R. Biden Jr. on Wednesday recommitted the United States to the Paris climate agreement, the international accord designed to avert catastrophic global warming, and ordered federal agencies to start reviewing and reinstating more than 100 environmental regulations that were weakened or rolled back by former President Donald J. Trump.The moves represent a first step in healing one of the deepest rifts between the United States and the rest of the world after Mr. Trump defiantly rejected the Paris pact and seem
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Shortly before Joe Biden was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States, Dave Hayes – a longtime QAnon influencer who goes by the name Praying Medic – posted a photo of dark storm clouds gathering over the US Capitol on the rightwing social media platform Gab. “What a beautiful black sky,” he wrote to his 92,000 followers, appending a thunderclap emoji.The message was clear to those well-versed in QAnon lore: “the Storm” – the day of reckoning when Donald Trump and his faithful allies in the military would declare martial law, round up all their many political enemies, and send them to Guantánamo Bay for execution by hanging – was finally here. 20 January 2021 wouldn’t mark the end of Trump’s presidency, but the beginning of “the Great Awakening”.Instead,
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Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday became the first Jewish Senate majority leader and the highest-ranking Jewish elected official in U.S. history. Addressing the Senate for the first time as majority leader, Schumer appeared briefly overwhelmed and took a moment to collect himself. “I need to catch my breath. So much has happened,” he said. Schumer, who first won election to the House of Representatives in 1980, has served in the Senate since January 1999. He was chosen minority leader by his fellow Democrats in 2016 to replace Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.), who did not seek reelection. “Today, the threat to our democracy from the presidency itself has ended, but the challenges we face as a nation remain,” Schumer said in a floor speech after Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were swor
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Credit...Jason Andrew for The New York Times“I feel lighter,” said a woman in Chicago. For many in an exhausted, divided nation, the inauguration was a sea change, not just a transition.Credit...Jason Andrew for The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021, 7:01 p.m. ETEarly Inauguration Day morning, she slipped into her pandemic-era work clothes of gray sweatpants and white shirt and ground the beans. Then, with her mug of coffee, she watched on her kitchen television as the green-and-white helicopter took air, removing from the White House grounds the outgoing 45th president of the United States, Donald J. Trump.In that kitchen, in a brick Colonial house in Watertown, Mass., tears came to the eyes of the woman, Karolyn Kurkjian-Jones. Tears of unabashed joy.“It’s over, it’s over, it’s ove
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A surge in coronavirus cases and game postponements has led to tighter rules about player interactions, on and off the court. But it’s not always clear where the outbreaks began.Credit...Geoff Burke/USA Today Sports, via ReutersJan. 20, 2021, 6:59 p.m. ETLast Tuesday, the N.B.A. and its players’ union tightened their coronavirus protocols — mandating that players spend at least the next two weeks almost exclusively at home or at their hotels on the road when not playing basketball.Three days later, the Washington Wizards held a news conference saying that six of their players had tested positive for the coronavirus and that the team did not have enough players to practice. That same day, Karl-Anthony Towns, the Minnesota Timberwolves star whose mother died of Covid-19, said that he,
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The government is to publish its long-promised overhaul of skills and vocational education in England, which will give employers a direct role in designing new qualifications but without any commitments over long-term funding for the further education sector.The white paper will seek to align courses with the needs of employers, and encourage the growth of new higher-level vocational and technical qualifications sitting between school leaving and an undergraduate degree.Gavin Williamson, the education secretary, said: “These reforms are at the heart of our plans to build back better, ensuring all technical education and training is based on what employers want and need, while providing individuals with the training they need to get a well-paid and secure job, no matter where they live, a
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Cases of coronavirus may no longer be falling across England, according to a major survey that raises concerns over whether lockdown measures can contain the new variant, as the UK reported a record daily number of deaths.Boris Johnson described the 1,820 deaths reported on Wednesday as “appalling”, as he warned: “There will be more to come.”Scientists at Imperial College London analysed swab tests from more than 142,000 people across England between 6 and 15 January which suggested that new infections may have fallen recently but were now stable, and perhaps even growing slightly, with only south-west England showing clear evidence of a decline.Imperial’s React-1 infection survey found 1.58% of people tested had the virus, a rise of 74% compared with the previous survey conducte
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Unilever has said it will tackle advertising stereotypes and work with more businesses run by women and other under-represented groups as part of a wider inclusivity drive.The FTSE 100 company, which is behind household names such as Dove soap, Ben & Jerry’s ice-cream and Marmite, said it planned to use the might of its brands, coupled with its advertising spending power as one of the world’s biggest to make a difference.Dave Ingram, its chief procurement officer, said Unilever had set a target of spending €2bn (£1.8bn) a year with companies owned and managed by women, under-represented minority ethnic groups, people with disabilities and the LGBTQI+ community by 2025.That figure compares with €300m today, Ingram said. Theinitiative is backed up by a development fund to help entre
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THULASENDRAPURAM, India (AP) — Residents of a tiny Indian village surrounded by rice paddies flocked to a Hindu temple, setting off firecrackers and praying and as they watched Kamala Harris, who has strong roots to the village, take her oath of office and become the U.S. vice president on Wednesday. Groups of women in bright saris and men wearing white dhoti pants watched the inauguration live as reporters broadcast the villager’s celebrations to millions of Indians. The villagers chanted “Long live Kamala Harris” while holding portraits of her and blasted off fireworks the moment she took the oath. Earlier, the villages adorned their temple with flowers, offering special prayers for Harris’ success. Her maternal grandfather was born in the village of Thulasendrapuram, about 35
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Claudia Conway, the 16-year-old daughter of former Trump spokesperson Kellyanne Conway and anti-Trump Republican attorney George Conway, has alleged that her mother has been “physically, mentally, and emotionally abusive” in her latest TikToks. On January 19, Claudia posted a series of videos appearing to show Kellyanne shouting, cursing frequently, belittling, and seemingly hitting her daughter. Claudia said she had been recording their fights for years, and that these examples were only a handful of many throughout her life. Some of what can be heard in the video, ostensibly Kellyanne speaking to Claudia: “Fuck you!” “Bitch.” “If you only knew what people thought of you.” In another, she claims, “You can’t get coronavirus from the president.” (Kellyanne tested
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Here’s what you need to know at the end of Inauguration Day.Jan. 20, 2021Updated 6:44 p.m. ET(Want to get this newsletter in your inbox? Here’s the sign-up.) Good evening. Here’s the latest.ImageCredit...Erin Schaff/The New York TimesNumber 46.Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. became the 46th president of the United States, promising to move the nation forward on a path of unity.“Democracy has prevailed,” President Biden said during a sober, no-surprises inaugural event. At 78, he is the oldest president in the country’s history.ImageCredit...Chang W. Lee/The New York TimesImageCredit...Pool photo by Saul LoebMs. Harris’s ascension makes her the first woman, first Black American and first person of South Asian descent to be vice president. She is now the highest-ranking woman in U.S
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U.S.|Biden’s 17 Executive Orders and Other Directives in DetailThe moves aim to strengthen protections for young immigrants, end construction of President Donald J. Trump’s border wall, end a travel ban and prioritize racial equity.Credit...Doug Mills/The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021, 6:42 p.m. ETWASHINGTON — In 17 executive orders, memorandums and proclamations signed hours after his inauguration, President Biden moved swiftly on Wednesday to dismantle Trump administration policies his aides said have caused the “greatest damage” to the nation.Despite an inaugural address that called for unity and compromise, Mr. Biden’s first actions as president are sharply aimed at sweeping aside former President Donald J. Trump’s pandemic response, reversing his environmental agenda, tearing down his anti-immigration policies, bolstering the teetering economic recovery and restoring federal efforts to promote diversity.Here’s a look at what the measures aim to accomplish.On the PandemicMr. Biden has signed an executive order appointing Jeffrey D. Zients as the official Covid-19 response coordinator who will report to the president, in an effort to “aggressively” gear up the nation’s response to the pandemic. The order also restores the directorate for global health security and biodefense at the National Security Council, a group Mr. Trump had disbanded.Though it is not a national mask mandate, which would most likely fall to a legal challenge, Mr. Biden is requiring social distancing and the wearing of masks on all federal property and by all federal employees. He is also starting a “100 days masking challenge” urging all Americans to wear masks and state an
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Dr. Biden, who holds a doctorate in educational leadership, will continue to teach writing at Northern Virginia Community College, where she taught full-time during her two terms as second lady.Credit...Amr Alfiky/The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021Updated 6:37 p.m. ETWASHINGTON — After four tumultuous years, Americans may expect the incoming first lady, Jill Biden, to return the East Wing to a more traditional presence. But before she took office, Dr. Biden signaled that she would be bringing her own approach to the job.Her second job, anyway.Dr. Biden, who has a doctorate in educational leadership, will continue teaching writing at Northern Virginia Community College, where she taught full-time as second lady throughout the Obama administration. As first lady, she will be the first to balance her career with public-facing duties, a development her team has downplayed to protect her privacy.“Dr. Biden will keep her teaching at Northern Virginia Community College separate from her public role,” said her spokesman, Michael LaRosa. Dr. Biden has also matter-of-factly shrugged off questions about her decision, noting that she did not really think of it in “historic terms” because she had already taught as second lady.Still, whether or not she publicizes it, Dr. Biden, 69, will be the first to try such a balancing act, and will inherit the scrutiny associated with her newest role. As her modern predecessors have found, although being first lady of the United States is technically a job without any official responsibilities, the expectations of the president, the White House, American voters and a few thousand journalists must be managed.In December, Dr. Biden’s career
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Laboratory studies of mutations circulating in South Africa suggest they may dodge some of the body’s immune responses.Credit...Samantha Reinders for The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021, 6:37 p.m. ETThe steady drumbeat of reports about new variants of the coronavirus — first in Britain, then in South Africa, Brazil and the United States — have brought a new worry: Will vaccines protect against these altered versions of the virus?The answer so far is yes, several experts said in interviews. But two small new studies, posted online Tuesday night, suggest that some variants may pose unexpected challenges to the immune system, even in those who have been vaccinated — a development that most scientists had not anticipated seeing for months, even years.The findings result from laboratory experiments with blood samples from groups of patients, not observations of the virus spreading in the real world. The studies have not yet been peer-reviewed.But experts who reviewed the papers agreed that the findings raised two disturbing possibilities. People who had survived mild infections with the coronavirus may still be vulnerable to infection with a new variant; and more worryingly, the vaccines may be less effective against the variants.Existing vaccines will still prevent serious illness, and people should continue getting them, said Dr. Michel Nussenzweig, an immunologist at Rockefeller University in New York, who led one of the studies: “If your goal is to keep people out of the hospital, then this is going to work just fine.”But the vaccines may not prevent people from becoming mildly or asymptomatically infected with the variants, he said. “They may not even know that they were infected,” Dr. Nussenzweig added. If the infected can still transmit the virus to others who are not immunized, it will continue to claim lives.The vaccines work by stimulating the body to produce antibodies against the coronavirus. Scientists had expected that over time, the virus may gain mutations that allow it to evade these antibodies — so-called escape mutations. Some studies had even predicted which mutations would be most advantageous to the virus.But scientists had hoped t
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Ole Gunnar Solskjær paid tribute to Paul Pogba after the France midfielder helped restore Manchester United to the top of the Premier League at Fulham.Pogba has morphed from problem to solution for the United manager in recent weeks and his stunning left footed winning goal in the 2-1 victory proved emblematic of an excellent all‑round performance.“Paul’s enjoying his football, he’s mentally very happy, he’s physically in very good shape and we know all about his talent,” Solskjær said. “I scored a couple of decent left-foot goals in my day but not one that good, not one from 25 yards into the top corner. It was a great goal.“We’ve always said Paul Pogba can do everything, he can play wide, in central midfield, create chances and score goals. He’s really come on. The key was getting him match fit. Today he was in midfield and he was so committed and got tackles in as well as his goal.”It lifted United two points clear of Manchester City and Leicester and six ahead of Liverpool at the top of the table, although City and the champions both have a game in hand in this tightest of title races.Similarly fine margins held sway on the Craven Cottage pitch. Before Pogba undid Scott Parker’s side, United had been forced to come from behind in the wake of Ademola
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Part of HuffPost Politics. ©2021 Verizon Media. All rights reserved. Twitter Users Slam Stephen Miller For Attacking Joe Biden On Twitter Stephen Miller spent his first day as a former White House adviser by attacking newly inaugurated President Joe Biden on Twitter. In what appears to be the only tweet currently on his personal account, Miller griped about Biden’s pledge to “be a president for all Americans” while also planning to roll back the Trump administration’s most hard-line immigration policies. Today, @POTUS pledged to be a president for all Americans. It’s unclear how all Americans are served by opening travel from terror hot spots, proposing a giant amnesty, or halting the installation of security barriers along the Southwest border.— Stephen Miller (@StephenM) January 20, 2021 But if Miller expected his tweet to be greeted with excitement, he got a rude awakening. Not only did Twitter users slam him mercilessly, but the number of “likes” his tweet received was only a fraction of the number of comments, a social media tragedy known as “being ratioed.” Though Miller complained about Biden “opening travel from terror hot spots,” Twitter users noted that it was Miller who “helped incite a terror attack on Congress.” They also pointed out that he “wrote the policy to separate infants from their mothers” and implemented the “most extreme anti-immigrant agenda of modern times.” You helped incite a terror attack on Congress and ordered the stealing of babies from their parents. https://t.co/Rrtdib0wxO— Mehdi Hasan (@mehdirhasan) January 20, 2021 National security cannot be a facade for racism. He's not the first, but he needs to be the last. https://t.co/QpAGXtCcyE— Nada Bakos (@nadabakos) January 20, 2021 It turns out the terror hotspots were Trump rallies, so.— Asha Rangappa (@AshaRangappa_) January 20, 2021 The avowed white supremacist who wrote the policy to separate infants from their mothers, ignore ICE's rampant sexual abuse of children, block desperate Syrian refugees escaping war, enforce a Muslim ban, & build a wall
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Actor and former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger received his COVID-19 vaccine on Wednesday in Los Angeles’ Dodger Stadium, and made sure that the moment was punctuated with two zingers from his own films.  “I have never been happier to wait in a line,” Schwarzenegger wrote on Twitter as he posted a video of himself getting his shot. “Come with me if you want to live!” The famous line is, of course, from “The Terminator” film franchise — originally uttered in the first movie by actor Michael Biehn and repeated by Schwarzenegger in “Terminator 2: Judgment Day,” as well as several other entries in the series.  Today was a good day. I have never been happier to wait in a line. If you’re eligible, join me and sign up to get your vaccine. Come with me if you want to live! pic.twitter.com/xJi86qQNcm— Arnold (@Schwarzenegger) January 20, 2021 But Schwarzenegger also dropped another quote from one of his lesser-known films as he told the health care worker administering his vaccine to “put that needle down.” This is a reference to the 1996 Christmas movie “Jingle All the Way,” where Schwarzenegger screams at a neighbor eating his wife’s cookies: “Put that cookie down, now!” The health care worker did not respond to Schwarzenegger’s reference — possibly because “Jingle All the Way” never received particularly great reviews. An Empire reviewer in 2000 panned Schwarnegger’s performance in the film, writing: “Anything as wooden as Arnie in a Christmas movie would normally be wearing flashing lights.” Aside from getting a vaccination, Schwarzenegger also took time on Wednesday to tweet congratulations to President Joe Biden. The former California governor — a vocal critic of former President Donald Trump — has argued that Biden’s centrist reputation helped him win the presidency.  I’m rooting for you ⁦@JoeBiden⁩. Your success is the country’s success. pic.twitter.com/BTvwsGN5Ih— Arnold (@Schwarzenegger) January 20, 2021 Calling all HuffPost superfans! Sign up for membership to become a founding member and help shape HuffPost's next chapter
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That could be a reflection of how complicated this moment really is. More than 400,000 Americans are dead from a pandemic that is still raging. The national vaccine rollout is slow, and new strains of the coronavirus are alarming scientists worldwide. COVID-19 didn’t stop Washingtonians from protesting in the streets this summer, but the country has changed since then. It’s changed a lot in just the past two weeks. Washington, D.C., is in lockdown mode, the result of a far-right delusion that led to a violent insurrection in the seat of American democracy.Read: A tragic beginning to a pres
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Editor’s note, January 20, 2021: President Joe Biden’s first official act on his first day in office was signing an executive order mandating that masks be worn on all federal properties and by federal employees and contractors. “The first order I’m going to be signing here relates to Covid,” Biden said. “It’s requiring, as I said all along, where I have authority, mandating that masks be worn, social distancing be kept on federal property.” The original story below was published on November 9, 2020. When President-elect Joe Biden accepted the Democratic nomination on Augus
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Once a dashing young senator, now a lion in winter, Joe Biden walked up the presidential lectern he could finally call his own after half a century of striving. The message that the 46th US president wanted to send a pained nation was the one that has defined his own life in the face of incalculable personal and political loss: resilience. “We will press forward with speed and urgency, for we have much to do in this winter of peril and possibility,” Biden told the audience at the US Capitol in Washington on Wednesday, as the sun finally broke through clouds that had brought fleeting snow. “Much to repair. Much to restore. Much to heal. Much to build. And much to gain.” That winter of peril includes a raging pandemic that has killed more than 400,000 Americans and a fraying body politic: two weeks after a mob encouraged by Donald Trump sacked the Capitol, this could no longer be described as a peaceful transfer of power. Now it is Biden’s great misfortune to have realised, at 78 years old, a lifetime ambition at a moment of what he called “the cascading crises of our era”. It is also his good fortune to have no alternative but to think big and aim high. The quintessentially moderate, middle-of-the-road candidate might go down as radical and transformational because that is what the moment demands. Just before noon, the oldest US president ever elected was sworn in on a 19th-century Bible: five inches thick with a Celtic cross the cover, it has been in his family since 1893. It was also used by his late son, Beau Biden, when he was sworn in as attorney general of Delaware in 2007. Biden, wearing a navy suit and navy overcoat, both by the designer Ralph Lauren, turned to kiss his wife, Jill, in an ocean blue wool tweed coat, and the sun shone. Against the backdrop of a heavily fortified Washington, this was a strangely calm and serene inauguration in the eye of a national storm. The public had been urged to stay away because of the pandemic and then forced to do so by a ring of steel and 25,000 national guard troops following the insurrection at the US Capitol two weeks earlier. ‘Unity is the path forward’: Joe Biden urges nation to come together in inauguration speech – video Instead of thousands of people crowding elbow to elbow, the Capitol lawn was dotted with a hundreds of physically distanced guests, TV crews and portable t
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Today’s presidential inauguration was mostly remarkable for how unremarkable it was. 6:13 PM ET Brendan McDermid / Reuters Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.Today’s presidential inauguration was mostly remarkable for how unremarkable it was. My colleague Annie Lowrey described today’s scene at the Capitol as “patriotic normcore.”After four years of assaults on democracy and endless uncertainty, President Biden steered the national mood, however incrementally, back toward normalcy.Biden’s speech invoked the familiar—and made it newly fresh.The president’s address “was well wrought, but it offered nothing unusual, nothing surprising, nothing especially memorable,” our Ideas staff writer David A. Graham notes. “Paradoxically, that was the source of its power.”Today, Kamala Harris did it.“Her vice presidency is worth celebrating because—however painful the process—she made it to the other side of the barrier,” the contributing writer Jemele Hill wrote back in November.The administration begins amid tragedy.On the eve of Biden’s swearing in, the U.S. pandemic death toll reached 400,000. And it could hit 500,000 by the end of February, B
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At least a dozen people associated with far-right groups and militias in multiple states have been charged for their roles in the Jan. 6 siege of the U.S. Capitol ― a number likely to grow as authorities continue to make arrests.  On Wednesday, federal authorities arrested Joe Biggs, a prominent member of the far-right Proud Boys gang, who will face at least three charges related to his participation in the riot. On Tuesday, prosecutors charged three rioters associated with the Oath Keepers militia on several counts related to the siege, including criminal conspiracy. Days earlier, an Indiana man surrendered to authorities after footage from the attack showed him wearing an “Oath Keepers Lifetime Member” hat and allegedly attacking Capitol police with bear spray. Others charged include far-right extremists associated with the Three Percenters militia and other so-called Patriot movement groups.  The charges give a clearer look at how organized paramilitary groups — along with white supremacists, far-right gang members and QAnon conspiracists — played a key role in the attempt to overturn the presidential election. The anti-government extremist movement closely aligned itself with President Donald Trump while he was in office; even though he’s now gone, members of this movement and other far-right groups are positioned to be a domestic terror threat for years to come. In the charging affidavit released on Tuesday against Oath Keeper Thomas Caldwell and associa
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the nyt parenting newsletterKids are expanding their tech savvy to connect and explore creatively.Credit...Tim PeacockJan. 20, 2021Updated 6:06 p.m. ETMy 8-year-old daughter started writing stories this year in Google Docs. They are thousands of words long, and my favorite one includes both a full brisket recipe and a murder mystery. She experiments with fonts, looks up synonyms and thinks about the plot even when she’s away from the computer.I don’t think she would be doing any of this if not for our virtual pandemic year.While I don’t want to sugarcoat the experience — so many children, especially children without access to computers and high-speed internet, are struggling — I do want to point out that there are upsides to online life, and some experts agree.With the caveat that there is not reliable research on long-term outcomes of this grand experiment, one positive outcome is that our children may be more fluent, earlier, in the technology they need for the 21st century. “We all live our lives digitally, so we want these normal academic skills to be contextualized through a digital framework,” said Jordan Shapiro, an assistant professor at Temple University in Philadelphia and the author of “The New Childhood: Raising Kids to Thrive in a Connected World.”What this tech fluency means is not just that children are able to make cute slide shows and lead a videoconference by the time they’re 8. It also means that they may be able to pick up on social cues online and the nuances of texted communication in ways adults are just adjusting to now. They’re still learning social skills, Shapiro pointed out — they’re just learning them in a different way.“I have the attitude of, ‘What can we learn from this?’” said Jenny Radesky, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Michigan’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, who has done research on kids and digital media. Parents should try not to go straight to feelings of shame and guilt for the amount of time their children are spending on devices, Dr. Radesky said, since much of their screen time is out of our control, and families are in survival mode. Instead, “be open to the possibility that your kid may do something really fun or creative or unexpected that you can talk to them about, and you can help them be savvy citizens of this digital world,” she said.You can use parental controls to prevent your kids from accessing inappropriate sites and content. But the most important thing to remember is to keep the lines of communication open with your children about what they see and do online. “If they think it’s a forbidden fruit and they sneak it, then there’s not open conversation and meaning-making around it,” Dr. Radesky said.There are two things to look out for to help your children have a positive digital experience, Dr. Radesky said: connection and creativity. Video chats are ideal for connection, which children really need if they are not seeing friends in person. Dr. Radesky prefers video over audio, particularly for younger kids. “There’s fewer misunderstandings, and there’s a little bit more sharing of each other’s space
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President Joe Biden has revoked a key permit for the Keystone XL pipeline, effectively killing the controversial project and jump-starting what he’s promised will be a seismic shift in U.S. climate policy after four years of inaction under Donald Trump.  The executive order on the oil pipeline, which Biden signed just hours after his inauguration, is part of an anticipated blitz of early executive actions to reverse Trump-era policies. Several are expected to target the previous administration’s industry-friendly rollbacks of environmental regulations. Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris have pledged aggressive government action to combat the global climate crisis, and in recent weeks they’ve assembled what environmentalists have hailed as an “all-star” team to lead that effort. As promised, Biden signed a second executive order Wednesday to rejoin the Paris climate accord. “A cry for survival comes from the planet itself,” Biden said during his inauguration speech. “A cry that can’t be any more desperate or any more clear now.” Revoking the permit for Keystone XL is part of a broader day-one executive order “to address the climate crisis, create good union jobs, and advance environmental justice,” according to the administration. Those efforts include potentially strengthening fuel economy and emissions standards; directing the Interior Department “to protect our nation’s treasures” be reviewing and possibly reversing Trump’s rollbacks of protected national monuments, including Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante; and temporarily banning all oil and gas leasing activities in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. It comes as a major blow for a fossil fuel infrastructure project that has been plagued by setbacks and litigation over the last decade.  In 2015, President Barack Obama rejected Keystone XL, saying that U.S. leadership to combat climate change would be undercut if he allowed the pipeline to be built. President Trump, in turn, revived both Keystone XL and the Dakota Access pipeline, signing a pair of executive orders in his first few days to move the pipelines forward. Legal challenges followed and in November 2018 a federal judge halted construction on Keystone XL and ordered the Trump administration to conduct a thorough environmental review. Trump subsequently sidestepped that court order, issuing a presidential permit in 2019 authorizing energy company TransCanada to again proceed with construction. If built, the planned 1,179-mile, $8.5 billion Keystone XL pipeline would transport some 830,000 barrels of crude oil per day from Alberta, Canada, to Nebraska, where it would link up with the existing Keystone pipeline that connects to refineries in Texas. Pipeline owner TC Energy Corp said in a statement Wednesday that it would suspend construction ahead of Biden’s order, which it called “very disappointing.”  While the Trump administration, industry groups and other project supporters touted the pipeline’s potential to create thousands of new jobs, environmentalists and Native American groups have long warned about its potential climate and other environmental impacts. The
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Fox News anchor Chris Wallace told the conservative network’s viewers Wednesday that President Joe Biden’s inaugural address was the best he’d ever heard. Declaring “democracy has prevailed,” Biden called on Americans to show tolerance and humility to “end this uncivil war that pits red against blue, rural versus urban, conservative versus liberal.” “I thought it was a great speech,” Wallace said, quoting that call for unity. “I’ve been listening to these inaugural addresses since 1961. John F. Kennedy, ‘Ask not.’ I thought this was the best inaugural address I ever heard.” Fox News' Chris Wallace: "Martha, I thought it was a great speech. I have been listenin
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Reactions to President Joe Biden’s inauguration are pouring in from around the world from US allies as well as adversaries. From Europe to Asia, foreign leaders are making clear what they think of the new president and the country he leads. Their statements provide a glimpse into how the world perceives the newest arrival in the Oval Office and his plans for America’s reengagement on the world stage. After a strained relationship with former President Donald Trump, Ursula von der Leyen, president of the European Commission (the executive branch of the European Union), tweeted, “The United States is back. And Europe stands ready. To reconnect with an old and trusted partner, to breat
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The fractured Trump administration is now behind us, but the wound is still fresh.Jan. 20, 2021, 6:00 p.m. ETCredit...Pete Marovich for The New York TimesI watched as Donald Trump left the White House on Wednesday, tacky and lacking in grace and dignity — consistent with his life and presidency — and I watched as Joe Biden was inaugurated as the 46th president of America.I had many feelings as I observed this pageant of customs. The first was the feeling of having — remarkably, improbably — survived a calamity, like stumbling out of a wrecked car and frantically checking my body for injuries, sure that the shock and adrenaline were disguising the damage done.To be sure, Trump has do
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As soon as he arrived in the Oval Office Wednesday afternoon, President Joe Biden made his first move to fulfill a promise to prioritize climate change by signing sweeping executive orders covering an array of policies and committing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Among the most immediate steps is rejoining the Paris agreement, the nonbinding international pact signed in 2015 to prevent the most severe consequences of climate change. By reentering the agreement, Biden is recommitting the US to drastically reducing emissions in order to limit average global temperature rise to below 2 degrees Celsius. In 2017, then-President Trump stunned the world when he announced the US would with
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While Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shares the incoming president’s climate change agenda, the Canadian leader is also a pipeline proponent.Credit...Terray Sylvester/ReutersJan. 20, 2021Updated 5:58 p.m. ETOTTAWA — One of President Biden’s first acts upon taking office was to cancel the permit for the Keystone XL pipeline, the long-debated project to transport crude from Canada’s oil sands to the United States.But Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and elected officials in Alberta, the Canadian province where the pipeline originates, are not giving up so fast.The nearly 1,200-mile Keystone XL was intended to carry crude oil from Canada to Nebraska, where it would connect with an existing
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Real Madrid have sensationally been knocked out of the Copa del Rey by Alcoyano, a third-tier Spanish side, who scored a dramatic winner in extra time after being reduced to 10 men.Zinedine Zidane rested some key names for the last-32 tie but still started with a host of international players, including Marcelo, Federico Valverde, Éder Militão, Vinícius Júnior, Casemiro, Lucas Vázquez and Isco.Militão headed in a Marcelo cross at the back post to give Madrid a first-half lead but the minnows fought back in the second period, with José Solbes equalising to send the match into extra time.Zidane brought on Karim Benzema and Eden Hazard and Madrid looked likely to win the tie when Alcoyan
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News AnalysisIn his Inaugural Address, President Biden spoke of a return to the ordinary discord of democracy, with a reminder that “politics doesn’t have to be a raging fire, destroying everything in its path.”Credit...Chang W. Lee/The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021Updated 5:53 p.m. ETWASHINGTON — In the end, the inauguration triumphed over the insurrection.President Biden’s plea for national unity in his Inaugural Address on Wednesday was rooted in a belief — born of decades working inside the fractious institutions of government — that America can return to an era where “enough of us have come together to carry all of us forward.”It was a call for the restoration of the ordinary discord of democracy, with a reminder that “politics doesn’t have to be a raging fire, destroying everything in its path.” The words were made all the more potent because they were delivered from the same steps at the entrance to the Capitol where a violent attack two weeks ago shocked the nation into realizing the lengths to which some Americans would go to overturn the results of a democratic election.Mr. Biden’s inauguration was notable for its normalcy, and the sense of relief that permeated the capital as an era of constant turmoil and falsehood ended. Yet he takes office amid so many interlocking national traumas that it is still unclear whether he can persuade enough of the nation to walk together into a new era. To do so, he needs to lead the country past the partisan divisions that made mask-wearing a political act, and to win acceptance from tens of millions of Americans who believed a lie that the presidency had been stolen.Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. is hardly the first president to take office in a moment of national desperation and division. Lincoln, whose inauguration amid fear of violence hung over this moment, faced a country fracturing into civil war. Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was in his third term when Mr. Biden was born, faced a nation mired in depression, with “Hoovervilles” in the shadow of the Capitol.While Mr. Biden does not face a single crisis of equal magnitude, he made clear — without quite making the comparison — that none of his predecessors confronted such a fearsome array of simultaneous trials.He listed them: a devastating pandemic that in one year has killed more Americans than the nation lost during World War II (he could have added Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan), an economic downturn that brought with it “joblessness and hopelessness,” a crisis of racial justice and another of climate, and, for tens of millions of Americans, a collapse in their faith in democracy itself.And finally, he argued, American healing would require an end to partisan self-delusion, and to the era of alternative facts.He never referred to President Donald J. Trump, but he was clearly talking about him — and the more than 140 Republicans in Congress who voted not to certify the election results, despite an absence of any evidence of widespread fraud — when he said that “we must reject the culture in which facts themselves are manipulated and even manufactured.”Mr. Biden’s presidency is predicated on a bet
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COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — As they witnessed President Joe Biden take the oath of office on Wednesday, House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn said former Republican President George W. Bush lauded him as a “savior” for helping get Biden elected. The South Carolina Democrat is largely credited with giving Biden the endorsement he needed to shoot to the top of 2020′s large Democratic field and win his party’s nomination. Clyburn, on a call with reporters, said Bush told him, “you know, you’re the savior, because if you had not nominated Joe Biden, we would not be having this transfer of power
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On his first day in office, President Joe Biden is beginning the immense task of dismantling former President Donald Trump’s nativist legacy on immigration, issuing an executive order to end Trump’s controversial travel ban on noncitizens from 13 countries. The policy, colloquially known as the “Muslim ban,” first went into effect in January 2017 and became one of Trump’s signature immigration policies. The ban has slowed or altogether halted legal immigration from certain countries that the former administration deemed to be security threats, keeping families apart and even stym
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Defeated and twice impeached, the 45th president used his farewell remarks before a sparse crowd to brag about his record and wish luck to the incoming administration.Credit...Pete Marovich for The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021, 5:37 p.m. ETJOINT BASE ANDREWS, Md. — President Donald J. Trump left Washington aboard Air Force One for a final time on Wednesday, the iconic plane creeping along the runway so the liftoff was timed to the closing strains of Frank Sinatra’s “My Way.”In many ways, Mr. Trump’s last hours as president were a bookend to the kickoff of his presidential campaign in June 2015. As he did then, he tossed aside prepared remarks that aides had helped draft and spoke off the cuff, having them take down teleprompters they had set up. As he did then, he spent hours focused on the visual aspects of the scene where he would speak at the end of a calamitous final three months that capped a tumultuous term.Before departing for Florida, Mr. Trump — defeated at the polls, twice impeached, silenced by social media platforms and facing an array of legal and financial problems — laid down a marker about his future, telling the roughly 300 supporters who greeted him on the windy tarmac, several holding American flags, that they had not seen the last of him.“Goodbye, we love you, we will be back in some form,” Mr. Trump vowed, with the first lady, Melania Trump, by his side in sunglasses and a black outfit. He has yet to say what that form will take, but people who know him said he remained bitter that congressional Republicans had joined in rebuke of his speech at a Jan. 6 rally that incited his supporters to storm the Capitol.ImageCredit...Anna Moneymaker for The New York TimesMr. Pence and the two Republican leaders in Congress skipped Mr. Trump’s departure and later attended Mr. Biden’s inaugural. Mr. Trump did not mention Mr. Biden, but for the first time he wished “great luck and great success”to the incoming administration. (A draft of Mr. Trump’s prepared remarks had included a space suggesting he acknowledge Mr. Biden, but were bracketed in case he did not, according to a person who saw them.)He did find time to note his own vote total.And he tried to claim credit for what he suggested would be a string of strong economic news in the coming months. “Remember us when you see these things happening, if you would,” he said.He similarly sought to promote his record in helping accelerate development of vaccines for the coronavirus. “It really is a great achievement,” he said.At different points, Mr. Trump seemed as close to becoming emotional as he had throughout his four years in office. He talked about the families who had suffered from the coronavirus throughout the last year.It was the first time in two weeks that Mr. Trump had addressed the public in person. He stayed mostly out of sight since election night, save for the incendiary speech he delivered to supporters on Jan. 6 urging them to march on the Capitol in an effort to deny Mr. Biden’s victory.His remarks were riddled with falsehoods and factual errors, boasts about his time in office and demands for credit, including his oft-repeated but
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BREAKINGThe president also canceled the Keystone XL pipeline and ordered federal agencies to begin the process of reinstating environmental regulations reversed under the Trump administration.Credit...Doug Mills/The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021Updated 6:00 p.m. ETWASHINGTON — President Joseph R. Biden Jr. on Wednesday recommitted the United States to the Paris climate agreement, the international accord designed to avert catastrophic global warming, and ordered federal agencies to start reviewing and reinstating more than 100 environmental regulations that were weakened or rolled back by former President Donald J. Trump.The moves represent a first step in healing one of the deepest rifts between the United States and the rest of the world after Mr. Trump defiantly rejected the Paris pact and seemed to relish his administration’s push to weaken or undo major domestic climate policies.Mr. Biden has elevated tackling the climate crisis among his highest priorities. In addition to curbing global warming, he has vowed that ending the coronavirus pandemic, restoring the economy and addressing racial injustice will be the central causes of his administration.“We’re going to combat climate change in a way we have not before,” Mr. Biden said in the Oval Office on Wednesday evening, just before signing the executive orders. Even so, he cautioned: “There are just executive actions. They are important but we’re going to need legislation for a lot of the things we’re going to do.”Foreign leaders hailed Mr. Biden’s first moves as a powerful signal that the United States, the largest contributor to global warming in history, intends to restart its efforts to lower pollution levels and to restore the international order upended by Mr. Trump. “Welcome back to the Paris Agreement!” Emmanuel Macron, the president of France, said in a Twitter message.Under the Paris Agreement, nearly 200 nations have vowed to reduce planet warming emissions to avert the most disastrous consequences of climate change. A letter to the United Nations signed by Mr. Biden on Wednesday formally starts the 30-day process of bringing the United States back into the accord.But analysts cautioned that Mr. Biden’s actions on day one must be quickly followed by a series of aggressive domestic climate policies to drastically lower the country’s emissions of planet-warming pollution from tailpipes, smokestacks and oil and gas wells.Also on Wednesday, Mr. Biden rescinded the construction permit for the Keystone XL oil pipeline, which would have transported carbon-heavy oil from the Canadian oil sands to the Gulf Coast. Earlier in the day, TC Energy, a Canadian company, said that it was suspending work on the line.But the lengthy legal process of undoing most of Mr. Trump’s environmental rollbacks and replacing them with new regulations could take many years and is likely to be strewn with political land mines if Republicans or business groups fight against them.ImageCredit...Thibault Camus/Associated PressEven before Mr. Biden was inaugurated on Wednesday, some Republicans lashed out against his new policy direction.“President-elect Biden’s policies from day on
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President Joe Biden’s international rebuild has begun. Biden, in the first hours of his presidency, rejoined the Paris climate accord and is expected to recommit to the World Health Organization, fulfilling promises he made during the campaign. He is also taking the first steps toward achieving his larger foreign policy agenda of restoring American leadership abroad. But these day one orders are the easy part. Now Biden begins the difficult task of rebuilding trust among allies, and trying to prove America can be a reliable partner. Over the past four years of the Trump administration’s “America First” foreign policy, other countries have taken leadership roles on climate change, and other powers, like China, have moved to fill the vacuum left behind by the United States in international institutions. Biden also confronts public health, economic, and racial reckoning crises at home, along with the fallout from the startling attack on US democracy earlier this month. The world watched the Capitol siege on January 6, and witnessed a US political system in disarray. It framed Washington as far from a stable partner. But with Biden’s announcements on the Paris deal and the WHO, the US is showing that it’s trying to start somewhere. The US’s recommitment to Paris will give the deal its first real chance Trump announced the US withdrawal from the Paris climate accord in June 2017, fulfilling a campaign promise of his own. The nonbinding treaty sets standards for emission reductions in an effort to keep the global temperature from warming beyond 2 degrees Celsius. A total of 189 countries are party to the agreement. Based on the terms of the treaty, the US couldn’t officially step away from the deal until November 2020, though the Trump administration did indeed formally withdraw last year. Biden is reversing that, and it’s a fairly easy reentry: The president writes a letter saying the US wants to get back in, and in 30 days, they will again become party to the treaty. “That’s obviously, in and of itself, an important threshold, because it brings us back into the single collective international body dedicated to meeting the climate challenge,” Peter Ogden, vice president for energy, climate, and the environment at the United Nations Foundation, told me. Ogden said the US will ultimately have to recalibrate its 2030 targets. That will involve domestic policy considerations, as it requires states, localities, and, most of all, businesses to achieve the benchmarks for curbing emissions. Those targets are also incredibly important, Ogden said. “It will be both a practical guide for other countries who are looking to understand the kind of actions that the United States intends to move forward with,” he said. “But it’s also going to be an important guide for other countries, who are also looking at their own targets.” Biden has said climate change will be a priority of his administration; he appointed John Kerry, former secretary of state, as the administration’s “climate czar.” The administration is reportedly considering convening a global climate summit. Rejoining Paris is, symbolically, the first act
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Two new art spaces funded by a Spanish regional government showcase the collection of Roberto Polo. But they don’t mention the shadier episodes of his past.Credit...Maria Roosen/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/via Pictoright Amsterdam; Gianfranco Tripodo for The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021Updated 5:42 p.m. ETCUENCA, Spain — He was once described by Vanity Fair as “a Gatsby for the Reagan era,” but, until recently, life has been quieter for the Cuban-American art collector Roberto Polo.Polo, a financier whose roller-coaster career included a major art fraud scandal that landed him in prison, has recently resurfaced in central Spain, where last month he defied the coronavirus pa
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Mask up, for the good of your country. As one of his first acts as president, Joe Biden is mandating Americans to wear masks while on federal property as part of an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. Biden’s action is more symbolic than it is prescriptive: While he has the ability to enforce that masks be worn in federal buildings and with regard to interstate commerce (think planes, trains and buses), he has no such power at the state or local level to make a more sweeping mandate. Adherence beyond the federal purview, then, will require Americans to comply out of a collective sense of civic duty. Biden has been urging Americans to wear masks since he won the election in November
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Shortly after taking office on Wednesday, President Joe Biden asked for the resignation of Peter Robb, the controversial general counsel of the National Labor Relations Board. Unions despise Robb and want to see him ousted quickly, even though presidents normally do not fire the NLRB’s general counsel, who acts as a quasi-prosecutor. Robb has more than nine months left in his four-year term at the board. Pushing Robb out now would leave the Republican with no more time to pursue anti-labor policies at the NLRB, which enforces collective bargaining law and referees disputes between unions and employers.  Biden’s request for Robb’s resignation was first reported by Bloomberg Law and co
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The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office found that some salmon species are “on the brink of extinction.” Habitat loss, climate change and other factors are to blame, it said.Credit...Ted S. Warren/Associated PressJan. 20, 2021Updated 5:32 p.m. ETA Washington State report put it bluntly: Because of the devastating effects of climate change and deteriorating habitats, several species of salmon in the Pacific Northwest are “on the brink of extinction.”Of the 14 species of salmon and steelhead trout in Washington State that have been deemed endangered and are protected under the Endangered Species Act, 10 are lagging recovery goals and five of those are considered “in c
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news analysisPresident Donald J. Trump’s clemency actions underscored his animosity toward a justice system seeking to punish corruption and betrayals of public trust.Credit...Anna Moneymaker for The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021, 5:31 p.m. ETWASHINGTON — Randy “Duke” Cunningham maintained a “bribe menu” on his congressional office stationery that featured different levels of payments he required from military contractors if they wanted his help to win corresponding levels of federal contracts.As mayor of Detroit, Kwame M. Kilpatrick turned City Hall into what prosecutors called “a private profit machine,” taking bribes, fixing municipal contracts and even using hundreds of tho
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Newly inaugurated President Joe Biden ordered his government to begin the process of reentering the climate pact former President Donald Trump exited.  It’s part of a suite of executive orders on climate change, including ones that will block the Keystone XL pipeline and start assessing Trump’s deregulatory legacy.  Hours after his inauguration Wednesday, President Joe Biden signed an executive order to rejoin the Paris Agreement, ending the United States’ brief but symbolic exit from the global pact to slash planet-heating emissions that virtually every nation has joined. Biden’s executive order kick-starts a relatively simple process. After sending a letter to the United N
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A Connecticut man who authorities said was filmed violently crushing a police officer with a riot shield during the U.S. Capitol riot has been arrested and charged related to the incident. Patrick Edward McCaughey III was charged Tuesday with assaulting an officer, resisting or impeding certain officer or employees; civil disorder; entering restricted building or grounds; and violent entry or disorderly conduct, the Justice Department announced Wednesday. The 23-year-old was among a mob of supporters of now-former President Donald Trump that were attempting to physically force their way into the Capitol during the Jan. 6 riot, authorities said. D.C. Police Officer Daniel Hodges’ bravery has gone viral with a video of him being crushed against a door during the U.S. Capitol riot. ⁠"If it wasn't my job, I would have done that for free," Hodges said. ⁠https://t.co/bJJb94kD6K pic.twitter.com/cNsaXsTMXR— NBCWashington (@nbcwashington) January 15, 2021 McCaughey, in a YouTube video cited in the criminal affidavit, is seen pressing a clear police riot shield against Metropolitan Police Department Officer Daniel Hodges, who is seen painfully pinned between two doors in a tunnel. As he presses against Hodges, McCaughey is repeatedly heard telling the officer to “go home.” He appears to warn Hodges that he’s “going to get squished,” according to the affidavit. McCaughey’s efforts appeared to have been aided by fellow rioters who took shifts in using their physical force to press against the officers, in effect further injuring Hodges, who appeared to be crying out loudly in pain, the affidavit notes. “As the officer was being pinned to the door by McCaughey, a separate rioter was violently ripping off the officer’s gas mask, exposing the officer’s bloodied mouth,” the affidavit states. “As McCaughey was using the riot shield to push against the officer, numerous other rioters behind and around McCaughey appeared to add to the weight against the officer.” Federal officials blasted McCaughey’s actions as “barbaric” and “un-American.” “The vicious attack on Officer Hodges was abhorrent and quintessentially un-America
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What Biden’s administration plans to do in the first 10 and 100 days in power. Contributors: Vox Staff President Joe Biden took office on January 20, 2021, amid a collision of crises: a pandemic that has killed hundreds of thousands of Americans and an accompanying economic collapse that has left millions out of work. On the campaign trail, he vowed to take immediate steps to address both, promising a flurry of executive actions and an ambitious legislative agenda in a Congress where Democrats hold the slimmest possible majority in the Senate. Whether Biden will be able to pass an ambitious stimulus package, fix the nation’s flawed Covid-19 vaccine rollout, and get Congress to act on immigration and other priorities, all while unraveling his predecessor’s legacy, remains to be seen. But Biden’s first 100 days in office, and the actions he takes during that time, will not only set the tone for the rest of his presidency — they could determine whether he succeeds or fails at implementing
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How do you host an inaugural parade under the potential threat of violence and a skyrocketing death toll from a highly contagious virus? Virtually. Even ahead of the January 6 storming of the Capitol, now-President Joe Biden’s inaugural committee planned to modify the day’s celebrations due to the danger posed by Covid-19, which has now killed more than 400,000 Americans. Together, the insurrection and the pandemic have made for a different inauguration, with the usual crowds absent. Abandoning the traditional pomp of an in-person parade, Biden elected instead to host a virtual “Parade Across America.” Following in the tradition of the Democratic National Committee’s successful virtual convention last summer, the inaugural committee hosted an event featuring regular “heroes” — everyday Americans who have engaged in noteworthy behavior — and celebrities. The event was kicked off by the University of Delaware and Howard University drumlines, the president’s and vice president’s alma maters, respectively. They escorted Biden and Harris from 15th Street to the White House and began a series of live performances announced by Charlie Brotman, who has announced almost every inauguration parade since President Dwight D. Eisenhower (former President Donald Trump was the only president not to invite him). The rest of the event was hosted by Tony Goldwyn, who played a fictional president on Shonda Rhimes’s show Scandal, and featured appearances by Jon Stewart, New Radicals, and Earth, Wind, and Fire, among other famous entertainers. This new format made for a unique parade, one that showcased everyday Americans, whom the Biden team refers to as American “heroes.” They ranged from a teacher in Texas who went on a road trip to teach her virtual classroom history from important locations to a 12-year-old who played the trumpet for hospital workers during their breaks. Biden’s team has hoped to emphasize unity as the theme of the inaugural events and ultimately was able to do so symbolically in his inaugural parade — highlighting Americans from all 56 US states and territories, a first for inaugural parades, according to the inaugural comm
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In the aftermath of the Capitol insurrection on January 6 that left five people dead, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube promised to crack down harder on false claims that the US presidential election was stolen and on dangerous fringe movements like QAnon. But two weeks later — on Inauguration day, no less — it’s easy to find this same kind of misinformation on their platforms. That these theories continue to spread on social media impacts all of us, regardless of whether or not we believe them. As the Capitol insurrection earlier this month showed, online misinformation doesn’t just stay online. It can fuel real-life violence. “[If] you’re not a keyboard warrior, and you don’t argue with people and you’re ultimately even-keeled about it, that doesn’t mean that you get to ignore it,” says Gordon Pennycook, who studies the psychology of believing misinformation at the University of Regina in Canada. “We live in a social world, and people’s beliefs do have consequences.” While some people discount misinformation as largely a fringe phenomenon, even a small number of people intensely buying into such theories can lead to offline violence, he explained. Early data shows that social media companies’ recent moves to boot President Trump, some of his allies, and tens of thousands of QAnon-affiliated accounts off their platforms have contributed to a massive decline in misinformation. But accounts promoting conspiracy theories continue to show up online — as the misinformation surrounding Joe Biden’s inauguration makes clear. Here are some of the false claims and theories that are still managing to spread on major social media sites. The false claim that Biden’s inauguration is fake and that the military is going to reinstall Trump as president As of this morning, Joe Biden has officially been sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. But in the week leading up to his inauguration, the false claim that his inauguration had been canceled racked up about 15,000 mentions on social media platforms like Twitter and Reddit and other websites, according to data
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President Joe Biden has issued an executive order extending a pause on federal student loan payments. The order, which covers the vast majority of all federal student loans, will allow borrowers to defer payments without penalty and reset interest rates to zero. President Joe Biden on Wednesday issued an executive order to extend a pause on federal student loan payments through at least the end of September 2021.  A pause on payments first went into effect as the coronavirus pandemic began in March 2020, and was extended in December to expire on Jan. 31. Borrowers were able to defer payments without penalty and reset interest rates to zero. Biden advisers had made it clear ahead of the inauguration that the incoming president intended to issue such an order immediately. The order
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On a sodden, freezing Wednesday night in west London Manchester United came from behind to claim a fiercely fought 2-1 win against an impressive, resilient Fulham team.The result leaves United top of the Premier League table, and extends to 17 matches their unbeaten away run, equalling the all-time club record. Best of all it arrived thanks to a moment of the highest quality from Paul Pogba, who was a quietly majestic presence in midfield.This always looked a stiffer test for the visitors than the table might suggest. With a mist of dense January rain barreling in over the skeleton of the new stand, United were forced to dig deep into their own reserves against well-organised opponents.“We needed the win and got it the hard way,” Pogba said afterwards, although there was nothing but sw
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Democrats aren’t done with Donald Trump yet. Trump escaped his four years in Washington without disclosing his tax returns, as most modern presidents do, and Democrats failed to pry the returns free with a lawsuit.  But the House Ways and Means Committee, which has jurisdiction over taxes, plans to renew its efforts to get the now-ex-president’s returns.  Ways and Means will “continue to pursue its case” for Trump’s taxes as part of its effort to oversee the mandatory annual audit of both the president and vice president, committee spokeswoman Erin Hatch told HuffPost in a statement.  Federal law says the Treasury Department, which oversees the IRS, is supposed to hand over any tax return document that tax policy committees on Capitol Hill request. Congress gave itself this power in a 1924 law designed to expose corruption in the executive branch.  The IRS has audited the president and vice president every year since Richard Nixon got caught underpaying his taxes ― and he got caught partly thanks to IRS disclosures to Congress under the 1924 law.   Trump has long bragged about his ability to avoid taxes. The New York Times, which has obtained copies of his return
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In the final hours of his presidency Wednesday, Donald Trump issued a pardon for Albert Pirro, a real estate development lawyer with ties to the Trump Organization who is the ex-husband of Fox News host Jeanine Pirro. A prominent GOP fundraiser, Albert Pirro served 11 months in prison after being convicted of conspiracy and tax evasion in 2000. Jeanine Pirro was the district attorney of Westchester County at the time. The couple separated in 2007 after more than 30 years of marriage. Albert Pirro, who represented Trump in various real estate deals in the 1990s, received his pardon a day after Trump granted clemency to more than 140 people, including longtime Trump adviser Steve Bannon and rapper Lil Wayne. He told The Daily Beast he was surprised to be granted the pardon. “I’m in shock,” Pirro said. “I went to bed last night having read the list assuming I wasn’t getting a pardon. It certainly is a nice act on the part of the president. It has been 20 years since I served my time and it allows me to engage again in public companies which I haven’t been able to do previously.” Albert Pirro has two children with Jeanine Pirro, as well as another child from an extramarital affair in the 1980s. Jeanine Pirro was investigated in 2006 for planning to illegally wiretap her husband, whom she believed was cheating on her at the time. No charges were filed. Jeannine Pirro has been one of Trump’s loudest cheerleaders on cable news, but Albert Pirro told The Daily Beast that he did not believe she played a role in his fortuitous pardon. “I have a long association with the Trump organization as I represented them before my conviction,” Albert Pirro said.
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Part of HuffPost Entertainment. ©2021 Verizon Media. All rights reserved. Rihanna Turns A Simple Household Chore Into A Pro-Biden Political Statement Rihanna managed to turn a simple household chore into a tribute to President Joe Biden. On Wednesday, the pop singer celebrated Biden’s presidential inauguration with a photo of herself taking out the trash — and looking very glamorous doing it, we might add. The post was captioned, “I’m just here to help” with the hashtag #wediditJoe. Considering the singer has been very critical of former President Donald Trump, many people enjoyed her latest statement. [email protected] knows how to celebrate #TrashDay https://t.co/cKZNVzcKDT— Natasha Rothwell (@natasharothwell) January 20, 2021 Everybody really and truly did their part. 🤍 #wediditJoe https://t.co/Fw4vngxqQn— Kim Sherrell (@kim) January 20, 2021 RIHANNA IS UNDEFEATED https://t.co/ixtQNT4owc— Karen Attiah (@KarenAttiah) January 20, 2021 S A V A G E BY R I H A N N A https://t.co/LYmckOYA6Z— ✊🏾 Nick Guillory 🏳️‍🌈 (@nickguillory) January 20, 2021 Still, there was one lingering question.... what's in the bags pic.twitter.com/r7KOAMBw87— teddy✌😐✌artist of the decade fan $0.39 stan (@bleachellaboy22) January 20, 2021 Calling all HuffPost superfans! Sign up for membership to become a founding member and help shape HuffPost's next chapter
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The England team hotel in Galle was seemingly abuzz after Australia’s defeat in Brisbane this week. But this schadenfreude was also tempered by the knowledge that they themselves have nine Tests this year against the might of India and, more pressingly, one against Sri Lanka starting on Friday.Certainly Joe Root was keen to stress this on Wednesday, smiling as he noted that “the fortress has been broken, the Gabba has been breached” before swiftly returning to his more serious face and issuing the latest reminder that there is “a lot of cricket to be played” in the runup to his side
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On his first day in office Wednesday, President Joe Biden is signing several executive actions aimed at dismantling the Trump administration’s nativist legacy on immigration. With the stroke of a pen, Biden will be able to halt some of Trump’s most high-profile and controversial immigration policies: the travel ban, construction of the southern border wall, and his attempt to end protections for young undocumented immigrants through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. There’s a large human impact in rescinding those policies. About 41,000 people have been denied visas
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Alex Padilla is officially California’s first Latino senator, having been sworn in this afternoon alongside Georgia Sens. Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock. Padilla, a longtime public servant who most recently served as California’s secretary of state, will take over Vice President Kamala Harris’s seat. Selected by California Gov. Gavin Newsom last year, Padilla will complete the remaining two years in Harris’s term and be up for reelection in 2022. Now that Padilla, Ossoff, and Warnock have been seated, Democrats have a 50-person caucus and the Senate majority, given Harris’s tie-br
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Joe Biden has been sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. Biden declared that ‘democracy has prevailed’ during a ceremony that honoured the ritual transfer of power at the US Capitol, where exactly two weeks ago a swarm of supporters loyal to his predecessor stormed the building in a violent and futile last bid to overturn the result of the election. Kamela Harris also made history as she was sworn in as America’s first female, black and Asian-American vice-president. Other highlights of the day included the US youth poet laureate, Amanda Gorman, who received a standing ovation for her recital her poem, The Hill We Climb Joe Biden sworn in as 46th president of the United States
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Sens. Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock were sworn in to office Wednesday, giving the Democrats a narrow majority in the Senate and affirming the historical significance of their victories in Georgia. Vice President Kamala Harris presided over the swearing-in as her first act as the president of the Senate — a role she will have to play often as the decisive tie-breaking vote in a Senate split 50-50 between Democrats and Republicans. “Do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic?” Harris asked, in a question that has taken on new meaning since the Capitol insurrection. Ossoff and Warnock replied they did, and signed the Senate’s oath book. The men represent a watershed moment for Southern Dem
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Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock have been sworn into the United States Senate after winning their respective runoff elections in Georgia on Jan. 5, officially handing control of the chamber — and the 117th Congress — to the Democrats. Kamala Harris performed the ceremony hours after her own historic swearing-in as vice president earlier on Wednesday. She also swore in Alex Padilla, who now holds her former California Senate seat as the state’s first Latino senator.  In her new role, Harris will likely be called upon to cast tie-breaking votes in Senate, which is split 50-50 between the Democratic and Republican caucuses.  Ossoff, 33, and Warnock, 51, emerged victorious earlier this month, respectively defeating Republican Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler, who had aligned
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In the days following the violent Trump-inspired insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6, the FBI warned all 50 states that similar “armed protests” were being planned by right-wing extremists around their capitol buildings. But on Inauguration Day, at least, those protests turned out to be complete duds. Not only have there been no incidents of violence at state capitols on Wednesday as of 4 pm ET, but at many of them, the number of MAGA protesters could be counted on one hand. At the New York Capitol in Albany, Spectrum News reporter Morgan Mckay documented the presence of a single pro-Trump demonstrator. “He says he expected a few thousand ppl here and is disappointed,” Mckay tweeted. (Thanks to Elie Mystal of the Nation for his helpful Twitter thread putting the tweets
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Read: Among the guardsmenTrump left the White House with his wife, Melania, at about 8:20 a.m., refusing to take questions from the press. He walked to Marine One with an ominous send-off: “I just want to say goodbye, but hopefully it’s not a long-term goodbye. We’ll see each other again.” Later, in a brief departure ceremony at Joint Base Andrews before flying to Florida, he gave a familiar and repetitive summation of what he views as his accomplishments in office. He of course neglected to mention the incident that will come to overshadow everything else that happened over the past four years: a lethal insurrection carried out by his supporters after a rally in which he’d again falsely claimed that the election was stolen. Trump may have no interest in revisiting the riot at th
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Now that Mr. Trump is finally out of office, President Biden has the chance to lead America forward.Jan. 20, 2021, 4:43 p.m. ETCredit...Jason Andrew for The New York TimesFor a long time, Jan. 20, 2021, seemed like a day that might never come. It sat there far down the calendar, a tantalizing hint of a moment when America might at last be freed from the grip of the meanest, most corrupt and most incompetent presidency in the nation’s history.The countdown was measured first in weeks, then in days, then hours and minutes, as though Americans were anticipating the arrival of a new year. In this case, it was not just the intense desire of more than 81 million Americans to turn the page on an abominable administration, but a legitimate fear of what Donald Trump could do while still in power,
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It’s not every day that you get to inaugurate the 46th president of the United States, the first female vice-president of color, or attend the inauguration, period. But for Bernie Sanders, it’s also not often he gets enough time in the middle of the day to run errands and take care of his mail either .The former presidential hopeful has drawn side eyes for turning up to the inauguration day sans formal attire – instead looking like he was stopping by between doing his laundry and going to the post office. Wearing a winter jacket, oversized mittens and holding a manila envelope, the Vermont senator at least gets top marks for one thing: “absolutely crushing Vermont dadcore”.But for those wanting to get the Sanders’ look, it could be difficult to get hold of his mittens – those
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From a sartorial perspective, the coats took center stage at the inauguration of President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris. There was first lady Jill Biden’s custom blue Markarian coat and dress ensemble, Michelle Obama’s plum Sergio Hudson look and Harris’ purple Christopher John Rogers coat.Another fan favorite was Harris’ stepdaughter, Ella Emhoff, who sported a plaid Miu Miu coat with embellished shoulders and a large embroidered white collar. She wore a Batsheva dress underneath and topped the look with a black mask and a Loeffler Randall headband to hold back her center-parted curls.Twitter users praised the look and even referred to the 21-year-old daughter of second gentleman Doug Emhoff and his ex-wife, Kerstin Emhoff, as the “first daughter of Bushwick.”Ell
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Vice President Kamala Harris’ alma mater, Howard University, played an integral part in Inauguration Day on Wednesday.  The school’s Showtime Marching Band, which has participated in presidential inaugurations before, escorted their revered alumna to the White House during the inaugural parade Wednesday:  WATCH: Howard University's Showtime Marching Band escorts Vice President Harris to the White House for her first time as the 49th vice president of the United States. pic.twitter.com/zPfbGBsYFq— MSNBC (@MSNBC) January 20, 2021 Here we go! The Showtime Marching Band is here, "escorting" Vice President @KamalaHarris with a special drum cadence. #BleedBlue #HU2WH 🥁 💙 pic.twitter.com/LvXjSpkfuG— Howard University (@HowardU) January 20, 2021 It was the highlight of the
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For four years the world had held its breath, but at last came the moment to exhale. Ever since noon on 20 January 2017, when Donald Trump took the oath that made him president of the United States, the people of the planet had found themselves in a state of heightened alert: what new madness might the most powerful man on earth unleash? Within months, he had seemed to threaten nuclear war with North Korea – in a tweet directed at Kim Jong-un, he boasted that “I too have a Nuclear Button, but it is a much bigger & more powerful one than his, and my Button works!” – and there were days when it seemed rational to wonder if America, and the rest of us, would even survive four years of a Trump presidency.Eleven minutes before noon local time, it became possible to breathe out once more
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Style|Who Designed Jill Biden’s Inauguration Outfit?A brief guide to how Alexandra O’Neill’s young label Markarian landed in a rare spotlight.Credit...Amr Alfiky/The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021, 4:13 p.m. ETJust like any first lady stepping into the White House before her, Dr. Jill Biden’s Inauguration Day outfit was bound to draw attention.Guesses were made about which American designer she would choose: Brandon Maxwell or Christian Siriano, whose dresses she had chosen for the Democratic National Convention? Tory Burch? Oscar de la Renta?Few — or none, perhaps — would have predicted that Dr. Biden would walk out into the cold Washington morning on Wednesday in a matching blue coat and dress by Markarian, a small New York City brand whose typical aesthetic signatures include f
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Here’s just hoping someone is luring her away from the White House with dozens of waffles. On Wednesday, fans of “Parks and Recreation” couldn’t help but wonder how Leslie Knope (Amy Poehler) would have responded to Joe Biden’s inauguration. In the NBC comedy, Poehler’s character made it no secret that she had a massive crush on the now-46th president, describing her ideal man as having “the brains of George Clooney in the body of Joe Biden.” The then-vice president even played himself in a 2012 episode in which Knope’s fiancé, Ben Wyatt (Adam Scott), surprises her by setting up a brief meeting with Biden. In the scene, a smitten and tongue-tied Knope stares longingly into Biden’s eyes, suggests to him that she take then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s positi
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President Joe Biden speaks during the 59th presidential inauguration. Patrick Semansky/AP The actions reverse Trump policies and launch a more progressive policymaking era. By Jan 20, 2021, 4:00pm EST President Joe Biden isn’t waiting for Congress to start enacting his policy agenda. His presidency is beginning with an aggressive first 10 days in the Oval Office with a suite of executive orders and actions. The promised actions span from the substantive to more symbolic. Some repeal key parts of former President Donald Trump’s agenda; others lay the groundwork for some of Biden’s own progressive promises. On his first day, Biden will sign 17 executive initiatives. He’ll mandate masks on federal property. He’ll rescind Trump’s decision to withdraw from the World Health Organization. He’ll extend eviction and foreclosure moratoriums as well as a student loan pause. He’ll take multiple actions on global warming, including rejoining the Paris agreement. He’ll move on immigration, reversing Trump’s travel ban and stopping construction of a wall at the US-Mexico border. He’ll reinforce commitments to racial equity and nondiscrimination protections for LGBTQ people. And more. Biden’s team emphasized in a call with reporters that these day-one action
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Taking office at a low point means that the new president might be able to claim progress without superhuman effort.Jan. 20, 2021, 3:58 p.m. ETCredit...Amr Alfiky/The New York TimesAmid all the exhausted relief and Twitter euphoria, it’s worth being honest: The inauguration of Joe Biden to the presidency was a dark scene overall, with strong decline-of-the-republic vibes. A windswept, wintry, barricaded Capitol; a denuded Mall; a military occupation. The establishment in masks, with a few celebrities mixed in; almost everybody looking aged, gray, laid waste by time. The ex-president absent, unmentioned, but a shadow over the proceedings all the same.But for Biden, who gave a solid, human version of the solid, human speeches that carried him to this office, this darkness is also his opportunity, because there are good reasons to think that the most immediate shadows can be dispelled (and a certain amount of political credit taken) without superhuman effort from his administration.The pandemic will be his first and foremost test, but even the much-too-slow trajectory of vaccinations that we’re on right now (joined with the much-too-high rate of infection) promises something close to herd immunity by summer. Combine that trend with a Democratic-controlled Congress that can agree, at least, on spending a lot of money quickly, and it won’t take any extraordinary developments to make a Biden-era recovery the major American story one January from today.The test posed by QAnon and militia-style extremism, meanwhile, might be less a generational battle and more a matter of watching the enthusiasm for Jan. 6-style confrontations evaporate as the F.B.I. ramps up arrests. (The
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Media|‘They Have Not Legitimately Won’: Pro-Trump Media Keeps the Disinformation FlowingCredit...Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesJan. 20, 2021Updated 3:57 p.m. ETForgoing any appeals for healing or reflection, right-wing media organizations that spread former President Donald J. Trump’s distortions about the 2020 election continued on Wednesday to push conspiracy theories about large-scale fraud, with some predicting more political conflict in the months ahead.The coverage struck a discordant tone, with pro-Trump media and President Biden in a jarring split screen: There was the new president delivering an inaugural address of unity and hope, while his political opponents used their powerful media platforms to rally a resistance against him based on falsehoods and fabrications.For some outlets like One America News, it was as if Mr. Biden weren’t president at all. The network, a favorite of Mr. Trump’s because of its sycophantic coverage, didn’t show its viewers Mr. Biden’s swearing in or his inaugural address.Rush Limbaugh, broadcasting his weekday radio show a few miles from the Palm Beach retreat where Mr. Trump is spending the first days of his post-presidency, told his millions of listeners on Wednesday that the inauguration of Mr. Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris did not make them the rightful winners of the election.“They have not legitimately won yet,” Mr. Limbaugh said, noting that he would be on “thin ice” for making such a claim. He then gave his listeners a false and inflated vote total for Mr. Trump and predicted the Democratic victories would be “fleeting.”“I think they know, with 74 million, maybe 80 million people who didn’t vote for Joe Biden, there is no way they can honestly say to themselves that they represent the power base in the country,” Mr. Limbaugh said.On One America News, viewers saw a lengthy documentary-style segment called “Trump: Legacy of a Patriot” instead of the inauguration. One of the network’s commentators, Pearson Sharp, provided the voice-over and offered only flattering words about the former president while he leveled false claims about voter fraud.Mr. Sharp repeated many of the disc
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The new president’s speech on unity — “the best inaugural address I ever heard,” says Chris Wallace of Fox News — follows Donald Trump’s “My Way” moment.Credit...FOXJan. 20, 2021Updated 3:58 p.m. ETFor a moment, cable news found something to agree on.At half past noon on Wednesday, shortly after President Biden wrapped up an inaugural address calling for an era of reconciliation, CNN’s Wolf Blitzer declared that the “world witnessed democracy withstand one of its greatest tests.” Brian Williams of MSNBC said Mr. Biden “gave the kind of inaugural address our presidents used to give.”On Fox News, home to right-wing stars like Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham who relentlessly championed former President Donald J. Trump, anchors and pundits took turns lauding Mr. Biden’s message and the man who delivered it.“I’ve been listening to these inaugural addresses since 1961,” said Chris Wallace, the “Fox News Sunday” anchor. “I thought this was the best inaugural address I ever heard.”It was an unusual — and perhaps fleeting — moment for a cable news landscape that had been rived by the years of Trump. The cultural divide over a polarizing president and the increasingly fractured notion of what is true and what is a lie seemed to play out daily o
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The winter wind caused a flutter in a new flag hanging high above city hall in Oakland, California, on Wednesday morning, as the Bay Area celebrated the history being made by one of its own.Oakland native Kamala Harris on Wednesday was sworn in as the US vice-president, becoming the first woman in American history and the first woman of African American and south Asian descent to take up the position.Harris was born in Oakland and lived in neighboring Berkeley, where her parents studied at the University of California, Berkeley, until she was 12 years old. She served as San Francisco district attorney, and California attorney general, before becoming the state’s junior senator.Harris has frequently cited her experiences growing up in the Bay Area as foundational in her political career, including being bussed into wealthier white schools as part of an integration program. On Wednesday, residents of the region proudly watched her ascend to one of the highest offices in the land.An Oakland-Scranton “Unity” flag, designed by Oakland artist Favianna Rodriguez and Ryan Hnat from Joe Biden’s home town of Scranton, Ohio, was hoisted into the heavy gusts the day before the inauguration.The Oakland mayor Libby Schaaf also hung the flag outside her home in the hills as the inauguration celebration continued on the other side of the country. “Congrats my friend Kamala Harris!” Schaaf wrote on Twitter. “Oakland is proud beyond words. First Black Woman & Asian Woman VP. Daughter of Immigrants & Daughter of Oakland. You make us proud to be Americans again.”It's just moving that a Black and Indian woman was born at Oakland Kaiser like I was, grew up in the flats near San Pablo Avenue like I did, in the same heavily Black and Indian district I did, and got bussed up to a school in the hills like I did, is going to the White House— Darrell Owens (@IDoTheThinking) January 20, 2021 Local businesses also commemorated the occasion. Local Food Adventures, a food tour company, boxed and sold foods that celebrate Harris’s heritage, and included a locally made cornbread mix, a garam masala spice blend from Oaktown Spice Shop, and a coupon for waffles from Harris’s
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China has said it wants to cooperate with Joe Biden’s new US administration, while announcing sanctions against the “lying and cheating” outgoing secretary of state Mike Pompeo and 27 other top officials under Donald Trump.The move was a sign of China’s anger, especially at an accusation Pompeo made on his final full day in office that China had committed genocide against its Uighur Muslims, an assessment that Biden’s choice to succeed Pompeo, Anthony Blinken, said he shared.In a striking repudiation of its relationship with Washington under Trump, the Chinese foreign ministry announced the sanctions in a statement that appeared on its website as Biden was taking the presidential oath.Pompeo and the others had “planned, promoted and executed a series of crazy moves, gravely interfered in China’s internal affairs, undermined China’s interests, offended the Chinese people, and seriously disrupted China-US relations”, it said.The other outgoing and former Trump officials sanctioned included the trade chief, Peter Navarro; national security advisers Robert O’Brien and John Bolton; the health secretary, Alex Azar; UN ambassador Kelly Craft; and former top Trump aide Steve Bannon.The 28 ex-officials and immediate family members would be banned from entering mainland China, Hong Kong or Macao, and companies and institutions associated with them restricted from doing business with China.China has imposed sanctions on US lawmakers in the past year, but targeting so many former and outgoing US officials on inauguration day was an unusual expression of disdain.Pompeo, who unleashed a barrage of measures against China in his final weeks in office, announced that on Tuesday that the Trump administration had determined that China had committed “genocide and crimes against humanity” against Uighur Muslims.Blinken said on Tuesday he agreed with Pompeo’s genocide assessment.“The forcing of men, women and children into concentration camps; trying to, in effect, re-educate them to be adherents to the ideology of the Chinese Communist party, all of that speaks to an effort to commit genocide,” Blinken said.China has repeatedly rejected accusations of a
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On BaseballA pitcher known for durability and consistency, Sutton’s approach was shaped by a childhood of earning everything you received.Credit...Associated PressJan. 20, 2021, 3:38 p.m. ETDon Sutton’s work was done for the night, another Atlanta Braves broadcast complete, one of thousands of games he called over decades in the booth. But Sutton slipped into the visiting clubhouse anyway, not to ask a question but to shake a hand. It was 2018, and a Braves rookie, Mike Soroka, had beaten the Mets at Citi Field for his first victory in the majors. Sutton offered congratulations and wished
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In Washington, D.C. today, Joe Biden took the oath of office shortly before noon, becoming the 46th president of the United States of America. In front of a small, socially distanced, and well-guarded audience on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol, President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris were sworn in. Performances were given by the singers Lady Gaga, Jennifer Lopez, Garth Brooks, and the poet Amanda Gorman, and Biden delivered his Inaugural Address to the nation. Gathered below are scenes from a unique moment in American history. Read moreHint
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In his first foreign policy act, President Joe Biden followed through on his promise to fire the head of the US Agency for Global Media, who abused his eight months in power trying to turn the US government-funded international media agency into a pro-Trump propaganda machine. Michael Pack, an ally of former President Donald Trump and Steve Bannon, resigned on Wednesday soon after Biden finished his inaugural address. In a letter, Pack said Biden’s team asked him to step down from his post as the head of the US Agency for Global Media (USAGM), a government department that oversees media organizations like Voice of America and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty — and is collectively one of the largest media networks in the world. “I serve at the pleasure of not one particular president, but the office of the president itself,” Pack wrote. “Your administration has requested my resignation, and that is why I am tendering it.” Pack was slated to serve a three-year term after his Senate confirmation to the job last summer. But Biden was clearly displeased with how Pack ran the organization, which is responsible for broadcasting unbiased news to nations that struggle to get unfiltered information — which explains why Biden prioritized Pack’s ouster. What Pack did to earn Biden’s distrust Pack made clear from the get-go that he would run the media agency by whim, not law. In his first hours at the helm last June, Pack fired the heads of USAGM’s outlets because they were too soft on China and didn’t defend American values — as Trump would describe them — enough to the rest of the world. For many people, especially the agency’s employees, that move violated USAGM’s “firewall,” enshrined in US law, that “prohibits interference by any US government official in the objective, independent reporting of news, thereby safeguarding the ability of our journalists to develop content that reflects the highest professional standards of journalism, free of political interference.” Even though the government funds the news agencies, they still run independently when it comes to editorial decision-making. Pack, then, could ensure the day-to-day operations of USAGM operations went smoothly, but he couldn’t force himself into the editorial processes of the organization. But by firing the agency staffers without apparent cause, Pack inserted him
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The departing administration’s decision to push through a declaration that China is committing genocide was the latest in a series of actions that risk politicizing the issues.Credit...Pete Marovich for The New York TimesJan. 20, 2021Updated 3:27 p.m. ETThe Trump administration cast its barrage of moves against Beijing, in its waning days, as necessary to stand up to China’s authoritarian leadership.Among its final acts, the administration declared that Beijing was committing genocide against Uighurs and other Muslims in a far western region. It held a video conference between a senior United States envoy and the president of Taiwan, the self-ruled island claimed by Beijing. And it jettisoned longstanding guidelines limiting exchanges with Taiwanese officials.But the decision to push through significant foreign policy measures so quickly — and during a time of turmoil in Washington — risks politicizing the issues and undermining their ability to gain global traction.While some of the decisions were in the making for months, the timing of their rollout makes them easy to dismiss. To Beijing, the moves were a last-ditch effort by the departing administration to needle China’s ruling Communist Party. And they could potentially box in President Biden by forcing him to either look weak on China by reversing the moves, or incur Beijing’s wrath.The moves were welcomed by many Taiwanese, Uighurs and other communities whom the Trump administration had said it wanted to support. But some expressed concerns that they — and their causes — were being overshadowed by geopolitics.“There are many people who suspect the legitimacy of this decision,” Tahir Imin, a Uighu
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Whoever was in charge of booking the talent for Joe Biden’s inauguration clearly had an easier task than their counterpart in 2017. Donald Trump’s transition team promised the world a performance by Elton John. Instead, performers at various inauguration events included Tony Orlando, of Knock Three Times and Tie a Yellow Ribbon fame; a fading post-grunge band called 3 Doors Down; country singer Toby Keith; and a woman who came second on America’s Got Talent. Elton John, it transpired, hadn’t confirmed and evidently had no intention of playing. Here was a lesson for unscrupulous gig promoters everywhere about announcing an act before they sign up.In fairness, they managed to grub up one actual musical legend – Sam Moore, one half of 60s soul duo Sam & Dave, who performed at a pre-inauguration event called Make America Great Again! Welcome Celebration. But the swearing-in ceremony itself featured only a choir and military band – a climbdown from Trump’s predecessor, Barack Obama, who had Aretha Franklin sing at his 2009 ceremony followed by Beyoncé in 2013. An excruciating nadir was reached when a Bruce Springsteen tribute act called the B Street Band withdrew from an inauguration eve gig. When the tribute bands start telling you to do one, you’re in trouble.Under the circumstances, almost anything would have been an improvement, but Biden’s team proved capable of drawing in some major stars: the Celebrating America TV special that was due to follow the inaug
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Therapists get an up-close look at a wide array of romantic relationships: the healthy ones, the unhealthy ones and the somewhere-in-between ones. In sessions with their coupled-up clients, certain negative patterns pop again and again. We asked therapists to reveal the bad relationship habits they commonly see and share some tips on how to work through them1. They spend all their time before bed watching TV. Watching a few episodes of “Schitt’s Creek” together may be one of your favorite ways to unwind after a long day — and that’s perfectly OK. But your Netflix habit becomes an issue when all of that sacred time before bed is spent zoning out in front of the TV (or staring at your smartphone), instead of doing something that allows you to actually be present and connect with each other. “Couples will spend more time watching TV rather than having sex or spending quality time together while not distracted,” said Los Angeles psy­chol­o­gist and sex ther­a­pist Shan­non Chavez. “It leads to prioritizing TV rather than each other or sex.”The fix: “I recommend that couples turn the TV off and replace it with listening to music, giving each other a massage or other forms of sensual touch,” Chavez said. “Both have better effects on stress and relaxation.” 2. They constantly interrupt each other. In the heat of an argument or spirited conversation, you may end up talking over your partner from time to time. But if you’re routinely cutting your partner off mid-sentence just to make your point, beware: “A regular habit of this will leave your partner feeling unimportant, irrelevant and unloved,” said Kurt Smith, a therapist in Roseville, California, who specializes in counseling men.The fix: To break this pattern, bring more conscious awareness to your communication habits, Smith said. Practice letting your partner finish their thought before you jump in with your two cents. “A good way to practice this is to begin to always wait until there is a pause before speaking, and then ask, ‘Can I share what I’m thinking?’” Smith added.3. They lose themselves in the relationship. “In the early days of a relationship, it feels good to dive in, even at the expense of individual hobbies, relationships and routines,” said Nicole Saunders, a therapist in Charlotte, North Carolina. “It’s not uncommon for one or both partners to abandon too much of themselves early on.”But what happens once the honeymoon phase is over? While you were so preoccupied with the relationship, you ended up distancing yourself from your friends, falling behind on your work goals, losing interest in your hobbies and not making time for your own self-care. “It’s a recipe for burnout and resentment,” Saunders said. “Oftentimes we aren’t taught that it’s OK to even have a need, let alone voice it. It’s vulnerable to share how you’re feeling, to ask for help, or to say, ‘I’m feeling down, can I have a hug?’”- Lynsie Seely, marriage and family therapistThe fix: First, acknowledge that your priorities as a couple are out of whack and that you want to set some new boundaries.“Frequent and clear communication is ve
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Asia Pacific|American Woman to Be Deported From Bali After Calling It ‘Queer Friendly’Indonesian immigration officials detained the woman overnight Tuesday and said she was being deported for “spreading information that could unsettle the public.”Credit...Firdia Lisnawati/Associated PressJan. 20, 2021Updated 3:12 p.m. ETBANGKOK — An American woman who has been living in Bali during the pandemic is expected to be deported Thursday after she praised the Indonesian island as “queer friendly” and offered to help foreigners enter the country despite its coronavirus travel ban.Indonesian immigration officials detained Kristen Gray, 28, overnight Tuesday and said she was being deported for “spreading information that could unsettle the public.” They also accused her of “carrying out dangerous activities” and endangering public order by not obeying rules and laws.“I am not guilty,” she told reporters outside the immigration detention center on Tuesday. “I put out a statement about L.G.B.T. and I am being deported because of L.G.B.T.”Her arrest came three days after she posted a thread on Twitter extolling the ease of her low-cost life in Bali and its tolerant community, and promoting an e-book, “Our Bali Life Is Yours,” that she wrote with her partner, Saundra Alexander. The couple also offered tutorials for people wanting to move to the island.Ms. Alexander, 30, will also be deported Thursday, according to their attorney, Erwin Siregar.Mr. Siregar said that the deportations were undeserved and that the couple had not broken any laws. Their goal was to help people come to Bali after coronavirus restrictions are lifted, he said.“They are good people,” Mr. Siregar said. “They can persuade tourists to come to Indonesia after the pandemic is over without a cent of payment. We should thank them, not deport them.”Bali, which is predominantly Hindu, unlike the rest of majority-Muslim Indonesia, is highly dependent on tourism and has long cultivated a reputation for tolerance in a country that is increasingly conservative. But with the ban on international tourists, many hotels and tourist destinations have closed. Balinese workers have struggled to make a living, and the tourism industry has been desperate to bring back visitors.In her lengthy Twitter thread, Ms. Gray, who is Black, praised Bali as a place welcoming of Black people. She also boasted about living an elegant lifestyle on a shoestring budget, comments that set off a firestorm of criticism among Indonesians on social media.Some complained that foreign tourists like Ms. Gray had helped drive up prices on the island and limit opportunities for Balinese outside the service industry.“Why do Americans think their peace of mind is worth gentrifying a whole island and pushing locals out of their own lands and into low-paying jobs,” one commenter wrote on Twitter.In her thread, Ms. Gray said that she and Ms. Alexander left the United States last January in part because of the high cost of living, and that she found living in Bali much more rewarding and less expensive.“This island has been amazing because of our elevated lifestyle at a much lower cost of
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TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — The New Jersey Supreme court has overturned a man’s bank robbery conviction because of a prosecutor’s reference to a classic horror movie. During closing arguments in the case against Damon Williams, the prosecutor showed jurors a photo from the movie “The Shining” depicting a character played by Jack Nicholson telling his terrified wife and son, “Here’s Johnny!” moments after breaking through a door with an axe. The reference was meant to illustrate that actions can speak louder than words, and to support the prosecutor’s contention that Williams should be convicted of a more serious offense even though no threatening words were spoken to the bank tel
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The Pasadena Playhouse has a new tribute to Herman, the composer of “Hello, Dolly!,” and Tomei turns up in “Beirut” and “Three Hotels.”Credit...Jeff LorchJan. 20, 2021Updated 3:10 p.m. ETOne of the benefits of streaming theater — come on, we must think of that glass as half-full — is that we can now mix and match offerings within a single evening. You can start with a short from London and pair it with a concert from Chicago. Or you can have a full meal of show tunes by sticking around the Pasadena Playhouse’s website.At 22 minutes, the very funny “Iceboy!” — a teaser for a forthcoming musical — is a tasty appetizer. Megan Mullally, Nick Offerman, Adam Devine and La
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VATICAN CITY (Reuters) - Pope Francis told U.S. President Joe Biden on Wednesday that he was praying that God would guide his efforts to bring reconciliation in the United States, while the nation’s bishops condemned Biden’s pro-choice stand on abortion. In a message sent shortly after the second Catholic U.S. president was sworn in, Francis also said he hoped Biden would work towards a society marked by true justice, freedom and respect for the rights and dignity of every person, especially the poor, the vulnerable and those with no voice. “Under your leadership, may the American people continue to draw strength from the lofty political, ethical and religious values that have inspire
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When Pfizer and BioNTech announced their astounding SARS-CoV-2 vaccine efficacy results in November, Arthur Reed was ecstatic.“The global investment and coordination of billions of dollars enabling this unprecedented pace of scientific discovery is truly an incredible achievement,” he said.But as a gay man in New York City living with HIV since the 1980s, he couldn’t help but wonder about the government and public response to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, compared to the early days of HIV/AIDS.“Unfortunately, in both cases there has been immense stigma against minority communities,” Reed said. “Calling COVID-19 the ‘Chinese Virus,’ and the ensuing rise in anti-A
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There were a number of concerns about what might happen at the 59th presidential inauguration, but what Joe Biden would wear was never one of them.With reassuring predictability, he was sworn in as the 46th US president wearing a navy blue, single-breasted suit by that most wholesomely all-American of designers, Ralph Lauren.In contrast to his predecessor’s erratic approach to proportions, it fitted him perfectly. His sky blue tie was of a normal length. The message: normal service is restored to the White House. The optics of this inauguration were serene, respectful and quietly joyous. Biden and his vice-president, Kamala Harris, the rock stars of the hour, presented as humble public ser
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This was a breathless affair for which an abacus was needed to keep count of the endless chances created. Manchester City created most of these in a blur of activity close to Emiliano Martínez’s goal and when Aston Villa were finally breached on 79 minutes it was deserved.Tyrone Mings dallied, Rodri mugged him, the effervescent Bernardo Silva received the ball, swerved away from a clutch of defenders, then fired in a memorable strike.This brought jubilation for City and anger for Villa as the visitors complained Rodri had come from an offside position. Dean Smith’s ire was enough to have him sent off by Jonathan Moss, the referee not impressed by the manager’s vociferous complaints. Y
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