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Julie Rodgers was 16 years old when her mother introduced her to Ricky Chelette, the “singles minister” at a Baptist church in Arlington, Texas, who coached LGBTQ+ youth on how to “change” their sexuality. The high school junior had recently come out to her parents; Chelette, a man with “same-sex attractions” married to a woman, was brought in to fix what was seen as a problem. As Rodgers recounts in Pray Away, a new Netflix documentary on the “ex-gay” movement within western Christianity, and her book Outlove: A Queer Christian Survival Story, Chelette preached an enticing, insidious gospel of change: that Rodgers’ attraction to women was due to an insufficient bond with her mother as a child, that such attractions could be neurologically altered by committed study, that to do otherwise would be a disappointment to God and the community that had formed the backbone of her life to date.Rodgers was one of at least 700,000 people in the United States to undergo “conversion therapy” – treatments, counseling, and community that pressures LGBTQ+ people to “change” their sexuality, and a belief system exposed with searing lucidity in Pray Away. The 100-minute film, directed by Kristine Stolakis and executive produced by Ryan Murphy and Jason Blum, examines the destructively common practice and its larger “ex-gay” movement, often led by LGBTQ+ people who themselves believed they had changed, several of whom later renounced their teachings.As the film outlines, conversion therapy is neither a specific practice nor singular movement; it’s “this complex amalgamation of old pseudo-psychology that’s disproven, the spiritual belief that you don’t have a place in God’s kingdom if you don’t change, and then this culture that surrounds you with these messages that are inescapable”, Stolakis told the Guardian.Pray Away focuses in particular on Exodus International, the non-profit, inter-denominational organization founded in 1976 by five evangelical Christians, which propelled and popularized the idea that it was possible – and preferable – to change one’s sexual orientation. (The organization’s then president Alan Chambers, who appears in the film, renounced conversion therapy in 2012; Exodus International dissolved in 2013, but an international offshoot, Exodus Global Alliance, continues today.) Several of the movement’s leaders were themselves LGBTQ+ people who professed, with various levels of sincerity, to have changed, offering an alluring roadmap to others vulnerable through shame, self-loathing, and confusion. “The movement provides this very dark but very appealing sense of hope to people who are suffering,” said Stolakis, “and shining a light on that felt key to understand the movement.”Stolakis was first inspired to investigate the movement by her late uncle, a conversion therapy survivor she described as “like a second dad”, who suffered from medical conditions common to those who passed through the movement: depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, addiction, suicidal ideation. She witnessed first-hand the stickiness of the movement’s ideology of shame and inadequacy
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1.58am EDT 01:58 After a Guardian Essential poll showed that a large proportion of Australian boomers are reluctant to take the AstraZeneca vaccine, columnist Peter Lewis has called on them to play their part in ending the country’s current outbreak: 1.38am EDT 01:38
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Top story: ‘Massive exodus of non-UK labour’Hello, Warren Murray at least able to supply you with some news – including freshly minted gold in the sailing down in the sport section.Gaps on supermarket shelves are likely to continue for several months, suppliers have warned, unless the government does more to tackle the shortage of qualified HGV drivers worsened by Brexit and Covid. Logistics and hauliers’ organisations said August would be a pinch point in the shortage as workers take summer breaks. Tesco is among firms offering incentives of £1,000 or more to lure HGV drivers. Rod Mc
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The UK’s biggest banks are failing to properly help fraud victims, leaving them “feeling abandoned at a time of crisis and exposed to future scams”, the consumer group Which? has claimed. Which? found that customers often struggled to contact their bank after they had been a victim of a scam, including one HSBC customer who waited a total of seven hours on hold and racked up a £50 phone bill. It surveyed more than 400 people who had been the victims of a fraud – or attempted fraud – in the last 12 months and found that 17% were unsatisfied with how their bank had managed the incident.The Office for National Statistics has estimated that for the year ending March 2021 there were 4.6m fraud offences, meaning a significant number of people were left to fall between the cracks, Which? has warned.It has previously estimated that £700,000 is being lost to bank transfer scams every day, which works out at £491 a minute.Of the people who reported fraud to their bank via phone or webchat, 15% said that they had waited 30 minutes or more to speak to someone. In extreme cases, such delays can cost thousands of pounds as fraudsters are able to empty accounts, unchecked.Which? found that almost a third of fraud victims said that their bank had failed to offer advice or resources to help them better protect themselves in the future.The figures come amid growing concerns over “recovery fraud” – where victims are scammed again by fraudsters pretending to help them recoup their losses. This type of fraud has seen a 39% increase since last year, with victims losing £14,408 on average.Jenny Ross, Which? Money editor, said: “Fraud can have a devastating impact on victims. When banks fail to offer proper support, it can make a nightmare situation even worse, and an absence of information from firms about how people can protect themselves could even lead to ruthless scammers striking for a second time.”She said the entitlement to a refund depended on the type of fraud that a person fell victim to.In the case of unauthorised fraud – where money is taken from an account without permission (for example, the card is stolen and used to make online purchases) – the debit or credit card provider must refund the victim unless it can prove that they have been grossly negligent or acted fraudulently.But for those tricked into sending money to a scammer – known
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Labor’s call for Australians who get vaccinated by Christmas to be offered a $300 cash incentive has been denounced by the government as an “insulting” and a “thought bubble” that is not necessary given the current take-up rate of vaccines.But – insulting or not – it’s a strategy that has been incredibly popular with governments around the world throughout the pandemic. In May, Australia’s chief medical officer, Paul Kelly, said Australia needed “as many incentives as we can for people to become vaccinated”, and when asked about options such as lottery tickets and cash bonuses he said all ideas were “potentially on the table”.For months, governments have been offering cash incentives, lotteries as well as gifts to citizens who opt to get the jab.Serbia is believed to be the first country to offer a cash incentive for vaccinations, with President Aleksandar Vucic offering €25 (AU$40) to citizens who had at least one jab by the end of May.Just last week, US president Joe Biden called for states to offer US$100 to newly vaccinated people in order to boost vaccination rates, which have begun to flag in some states. The US president also announced the federal government would fully reimburse small and medium businesses who provided paid time off for their employees to get vaccinated. In West Virginia, young people are given a US$100 savings bond to those who get the jab and Detroit is paying US$50 to those who drive another person to get vaccinated.Elsewhere the incentives have come in the forms of goods: a gold nose pin or a stick blender to men and women in the Indian city of Rajkot; two cartons of eggs for people in some parts of Beijing; in New York, free tickets to the aquarium, zoo, theatres and sports clubs.Food seems a popular incentive, with vaccinated Russians being given a free scoop of ice cream, while some in the US have been offered doughnuts and popcorn, and New Jersey residents have enjoyed a free drink through the state’s “shot and a beer” campaign.In the UK, the government is working with Uber and Deliveroo to offer discounts on rides and meals for young people who get the shot, amid concerns that demand for vaccines from 18- to 25-year-olds – 60% of whom are believed to have received at least one dose – is levelling off.Lotteries have proved popular: the state of Ohio offered adults who received at least one dose of a Covid-19 vaccine a chance to enter a lottery with prize money of US$1m. Guam introduced a “vax ‘n’ win” program to get the island’s vaccination rate above 80%, with residents entered into a draw to win US$10,000, a brand-new car and other prizes every week from mid-June until the target was reached.CNN reported that after a Thai district introduced a campaign to allow vaccinated residents to win a cow every week for the rest of the year, the number of those registered to get the jab jumped from hundreds to thousands.There is not a large body of research to say how effective incentives are for increasing the uptake of Covid vaccines, but research on other vaccines has found that offering a financial incentive increases people’s adherence to the vaccine regime seven-f
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When Victoria Nyanjura was abducted from her Catholic boarding school in northern Uganda by members of the Lord’s Resistance Army, she prayed to God asking to die.She was 14 when she was taken, along with 29 others, in the middle of the night. During the next eight years in captivity she was subjected to beatings, starvation, rape and other horrors that she cannot talk about even 18 years later. Five of the girls who were taken prisoner with her died, and Nyanjura gave birth to two children.“It really pains me that at the age of 14 I left home where not even one man had tried talking to me in terms of relationships and then to be captured and sexually exploited against my will … I really wanted to die,” she says. “I prayed for death but if it’s not your time, it’s not your time.”Evelyn Apio, then 13, at a camp for displaced people in Lira, northern Uganda, in 2005. She was abducted and taken to the bush for six months by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Photograph: Chip Somodevilla/GettyLittle did she know in those darkest of years, when each morning she would wake not knowing if she would survive the day and when she would see bodies discarded under the trees, that she would not only live, but become a powerful advocate for women’s rights.After a dramatic escape one rainy night, Nyanjura was able to return to her family with her children, go back into education and start the process of healing. Previously, she had dreamed of becoming an engineer but she changed direction and instead studied development and global affairs. Her aim was to go back to her community and “do something”.Now, her work has helped push through a major law reform in Uganda. She coordinated the Women’s Advocacy Network, made up of more than 900 women who were also survivors of the war in northern Uganda. Together they launched a petition in 2014 asking the Ugandan parliament to address the challenges they faced as they tried to rebuild their lives.Women were suffering ill-health brought about by years of trauma. Some had contracted HIV/Aids, and many had borne children out of rape. Many survivors were stigmatised and some were rejected by families and communities who were not ready to accept children fathered by rebels. The women had missed out on education and so found it hard to support themselves financially.The petition asked for free healthcare and better access to services, funding to support children born in captivity, training for teachers on how to work with trauma and a review of laws that require information on paternity, among other things.Ugandan children abducted and forced to fight by the LRA pretend to beat and abuse each other during war games at the Rachele rehabilitation centre in Lira in 2004. The centre used role-playing games to help children come to terms with the atrocities they committed or witnessed while they were being held by the rebels. Photograph: Stephen Morrison/EPAOfficials listened to their accounts and demands for change, and in 2019 the government passed a transitional justice policy to remedy the plight of survivors.“I am grateful they showed us the willingness,” says Nyanjura. “[It’s as if they said]
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Dylan Fletcher and Stuart Bithell kickstarted a potential Team GB sailing medal rush on Tuesday with a stunningly close-fought gold medal win in the men’s 49er FX.New Zealand’s Peter Burling and Blair Tuke had a four-point lead over the British duo while Spain were level on points going into the double-point medal race. In a tightly fought finale, Fletcher and Bithell led from the off but a three-way fight with New Zealand and Germany took the race right to the line.A lack of wind on Monday had forced a postponement of the medal race in Enoshima Harbour but there was no stopping Fletcher and Bithell, who aggressively took control of the race early on, determined to do their bit regardles
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In a rarely seen phenomenon in the simian world, a nine-year-old female known as Yakei has become the boss of a 677-strong troop of Japanese macaque monkeys at a nature reserve on the island of Kyushu in Japan.Yakei’s path to the top began in April when she beat up her own mother to become the alpha female of the troop at the Takasakiyama natural zoological garden in Oita city. While that would have been the pinnacle for most female monkeys, Yakei decided to throw her 10kg weight around among the males.In late June, she challenged and roughed up Sanchu, the 31-year-old alpha male who had been leader of “troop B” at the reserve for five years.Surprised wardens at Takasakiyama, where the
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It is one of Britain’s strangest landscapes, a spit of land off the Suffolk coast littered with the rusting junk of a mysterious and sinister past. Over the decades, musicians, film-makers, artists and writers have been sucked into its ghostly orbit, captivated by what the great existential wanderer WG Sebald imagined as “the remains of our own civilisation after its extinction in some future catastrophe”.It’s now a nature reserve, but for much of the 20th century, Orford Ness was forbidden territory, sealed off for military purposes from the village whose picture-book church and castle can be seen from its desolate shingle beach. In 2014, Anya Gallaccio captured the decades of anxie
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Gaps on supermarket shelves are likely to continue for several months unless the government does more to tackle the labour crisis hitting haulage firms, suppliers have warned.Logistics and hauliers’ organisations said August would be a pinch point in the shortage as workers take summer breaks, while firms offering bonuses and sign-on fees to recruit drivers were not helping matters.The shortage of qualified HGV drivers, worsened by Brexit and Covid, has left wholesalers unable to get goods to shops, with major dairy producer Arla on Friday admitting it could not get milk to about a quarter of supermarkets last week.Shane Brennan, chief executive of the Cold Chain Federation, said the issue
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If your politics involves frequent attacks on beloved national institutions, no matter how much you claim to be defending them from subversion, you risk looking like you simply dislike them. That is a problem for rightwing culture warriors who purport to stand up for a patriotic, socially conservative majority, against a tiny liberal elite that maintains an iron grip on the levers of power.After several years of increasingly outlandish rhetorical assaults – on the BBC, the National Trust, the England football team – it has begun to seem as if the culture warriors are starting to run aground.Nigel Farage’s recent criticism of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution – for allegedly pro
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Governments and businesses hoping to plant trees and restore forests in order to reach net-zero emissions must sharply limit such efforts to avoid driving up food prices in the developing world, the charity Oxfam has warned.Planting trees has been mooted as one of the key ways of tackling the climate crisis, but the amount of land needed for such forests would be vast, and planting even a fraction of the area needed to offset global greenhouse gas emissions would encroach on the land needed for crops to feed a growing population, according to a report entitled Tightening the net: Net zero climate targets implications for land and food equity.At least 1.6bn hectares – an area five times the
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We live in an era in which, for the most part, the generations do not mix frequently. Grandparents are visited occasionally; young people seek the freedom of independent living as early as possible. On social media, intergenerational warfare is commonplace, as members of gen Z (those born between the mid-90s and the early 10s) criticise older people for hoarding wealth, while baby boomers bemoan the perceived sensitivity of the younger generation.But what would happen if baby boomers gave the TikToking young adults of today an insight into their thinking – and threw some life advice into the bargain? To that end, we assembled a panel of baby boomers – Tayo Idowu, 64, a marketing director from London; Liz Richards, 68, a retired nurse from Derby; Paul Gibson, 63, an accountant from Arundel, West Sussex; and Maggie Tata, 65, a carer from London – to answer gen Z’s questions (even the tongue-in-cheek ones).What do you admire in younger people today?Caitlin, 22, NorwichIdowu: I admire them for their tenacity.Tata: And also for their adaptability. I don’t know how they do it. They can suck everything in and still manage to cope. And they’re willing to take risks. Their courage is just amazing.Gibson: I admire them for their confidence in IT. They’re probably the first digital natives, aren’t they? They’ve embraced all the possibilities of technology.Richards: For me, it’s how they’ve coped with the pandemic. I think they’ve had the worst time of any group, really. Obviously, not from the sickness and death point of view, but the fact that when you’re young your life is going out, meeting other people, doing all of that. They’ve had to do without a lot of it.‘Their courage is just amazing’ ... Maggie Tata. Photograph: David Levene/The GuardianDo you think young people are overly sensitive and privileged?JD, 21, south WalesIdowu: It depends how you define sensitive or privileged. I know some young people and for them the thought of going out to work in the summer holiday is like: maybe after I’ve rested for a long time. In our day, the idea of getting a paper round was the norm. So, definitely in terms of privilege, for some of them I
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Hundreds of critical health workers in the Australian state of Queensland have gone into isolation as the country battles a growing Delta outbreak, while New South Wales raced to administer 6m vaccine doses before the scheduled end of lockdown in less than four week’s time.Queensland’s chief health officer, Dr Jeannette Young, said health workers in quarantine included all the cardiac surgeons at the Queensland Children’s hospital, leading to delays in surgery and outpatient work.Millions of Queenslanders in 11 local government areas remain in lockdown, with nearly 8,000 in quarantine in relation to the outbreak.The state recorded 16 new local cases on Tuesday, bringing the number of cases to 47 in a cluster involving exposure sites at several schools and at least three major Brisbane hospitals.Queensland had so far sidestepped major outbreaks thanks to its strict policy of state border closures. The current lockdown can be traced back to two returned travellers – one from the UK, one from Indonesia – who flew to Brisbane at the end of June. Infections then spread to schools in the area.In greater Sydney, a further 199 local cases were recorded, and the NSW leader, Gladys Berejiklian, said she could not yet say whether cases had peaked after more than five weeks of stay
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A disastrous Olympic Games for Team GB’s sprinters became even worse on Wednesday as Adam Gemili tore a hamstring on the warm-up track – and then took nearly two minutes to hobble around his 200m heat.With Nathaneel Mitchell-Blake also failing to get out of his 200m heat it meant that the litany of woes – which has included Zharnel Hughes false-starting in the 100m final – continued.With Dina Asher-Smith, who was strongly fancied to win a 100m and 200m medal, also tearing a hamstring five weeks before the Tokyo Games, it has not been the Olympics that the UK Athletics head coach, Christian Malcolm, would have envisaged in his worst nightmares.Asher-Smith bravely recovered to reach the 100m semi-finals in Tokyo before withdrawing from the 200m, and could yet win a women’s 4x100m relay medal, but Gemili’s absence will hit the men’s 4x100m team hard.Speaking after hobbling across the line in 1min 58.18 sec, having pulled up a few strides out of the blocks, Gemili said he had injured his hamstring on the last run before he entered the call room. “On the last blocks start I literally felt it go,” he said. “I had to try but I’m in so much pain right now – I said to my physio: ‘Just strap it up and let me at least try to push out,’ but I can tell straight away. You don’t just cramp up when you sprint so it was a tear. I can’t believe this has happened.”Sign up for our Tokyo 2020 briefing with all the news, views and previews for the Olympic and Paralympic Games.Mitchell-Blake, who did not make the semi-finals after running 20.56, said he would “ask for more from myself in the future”“It was a season’s best time, but you have to take that with a grain of salt and understand that I am moving forwards, just a little slower than I want to. Adam unfortunately pulled up and we have to console him and keep his mind in the game because he is an important member of the group,” he added.There was better news for Britain as all three men qualified for Thursday’s 1500m semi-finals. But while Jake Heywood and Jake Wightman did so comfortably Josh Kerr – who is seen as a dark horse for a medal in the British camp – had to rely on a f
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Spartaco Perini spoke overwhelmingly about his time as a second world war resistance fighter in the days before he died. The founder of one of Italy’s first antifascism groups in Colle San Marco, a hamlet of Ascoli Piceno in the central Marche region, he was lauded by the Allied forces for his role as a fearless informant, work that helped to liberate Europe from the Nazis and end Benito Mussolini’s dictatorship. But he had one regret.“In his last few days, he spoke a lot about the great things the partisans did to restore freedom and bring about democracy,” said Pietro Perini, the partisan’s son and president of the Ascoli Piceno unit of Anpi, an anti-fascism organisation. “But he also felt they made one error – and that was not to have eradicated it [fascism] completely.”Spartaco Perini died in 2001, aged 82. Two decades later, Brothers of Italy, the descendant of a party formed in 1946 by the lingering supporters of Mussolini, is running Marche after winning regional elections last September, ending 25 years of leftwing rule. It was a significant victory for the party, which in recent years has steadily moved from the political fringes to being neck-and-neck with Matteo Salvini’s far-right League as Italy’s biggest parties in the latest opinion polls.Its leader, Giorgia Meloni, who started out in the youth wing of the Italian Social Movement (MSI), its postwar predecessor, is now readying to succeed Mario Draghi as prime minister in the 2023 general elections, having kept her party out of his very broad coalition.A savvy politician, Meloni has endeavoured to remould her party, pitching it as a conservative champion of patriotism. In her autobiography, I Am Giorgia, she wrote that she “does not belong to the cult of fascism”.But there are signs in Marche that the party – which maintain’s MSI’s tricolored flame as its logo – has not fully severed links with its past. In April, the Brothers of Italy mayor of Ascoli Piceno donated fascist comics to schools. A few days later, the national holiday to mark Italy’s liberation from fascism, the president of Marche’s education department sent a letter to students equating fascists wi
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Grace’s guest on Comfort Eating this week is the award-winning author Candice Carty-Williams, who talks about some of the most important moments in her life – and the comfort food that has seen her through them. They discuss star signs, being the ‘naughty’ kid at school and how a fridge full of someone else’s food helped Candice write the first draft of her debut novel, Queenie How to listen to podcasts: everything you need to know Support The Guardian The Guardian is editorially independent. And we want to keep our journali
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Last month, billionaire after billionaire hopped into spacecraft to reach the final frontier. Shivani Dave speaks to Robert Massey, the deputy executive director at the Royal Astronomical Society, to understand what, if any, positives might come from what has been called ‘the billionaire space race’, or if the money and resources spent on space exploration should be redistributed to focus on the challenges being faced on Earth How to listen to podcasts: everything you need to know Support The Guardian The Guardian is editorially independent.
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The head of a Kyiv-based non-profit organisation that helps Belarusians fleeing persecution has been reported missing after not returning from his morning run, a spokesperson for the Ukrainian police force said.Vitaly Shishov, the head of Belarusian House in Ukraine (BDU), was reported missing by his partner, police said on Monday.“We will investigate, until there is information about what happened to him. The statement by his partner has been registered. The partner said that he went for a run and did not return, disappeared,” the police spokesperson said by phone.Police and volunteers had mounted a search of the area where he went running but had failed to locate him.Friends of Shishov said he had been followed by “strangers” while jogging recently, human rights organisation Vyasna said on Telegram.Ukraine, Poland and Lithuania have become safe havens for Belarusians during a violent crackdown by president Alexander Lukashenko since disputed elections last year.BDU helps Belarusians find accommodation, jobs and legal advice, according to its website. In a separate statement, the organisation said it was not able to contact Shishov.Shishov’s disappearance comes as Belaru
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In recent years, some of the biggest scoops in investigative journalism have come about because someone inside government or the intelligence services has leaked sensitive information. There was Edward Snowden revealing the scale of mass surveillance being carried out by western governments, and more recently, leaks exposing who was getting lucrative state Covid contracts. Now, though, investigative journalists in the UK are looking worriedly at a consultation from the Home Office related to plans it has to update the Official Secrets Act. This law, created in 1911 and last updated in 1989, makes it a criminal offence for government officials to reveal certain kinds of classified information – and for journalists to publish it. The Home Office is suggesting expanding the scope of what information should be covered by the act and extending the punishments for breaking it. Paul Lashmar, the head of the department of journalism at City, University of London, tells Rachel Humphreys that the proposed changes could have a chilling effect on journalism. Meanwhile Nigel Inkster, a former director of operations in the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6), describes the secrecy legislation as a constant balancing act between privacy, freedom of speech and security.
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Four police officers who responded to the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol have now died by suicide, the Metropolitan Police Department confirmed on Monday. Metropolitan Police Officer Kyle DeFreytag was found dead at his home last month, the agency confirmed to HuffPost. His family later said the cause was suicide, Fox5 reported. DeFreytag was 26. “I am writing to share tragic news that Officer Kyle DeFreytag of the 5th District was found deceased last evening,” MPD Chief Robert Contee wrote to the department in mid-July, per WUSA. “This is incredibly hard news for us all, and for those that knew him best.” The department said DeFreytag responded to the Jan. 6 insurrection and had served with the MPD since November 2016. The news comes just hours after the Metropolitan Police Department said a third officer, Gunther Hashida, was found dead in his home on Thursday. “We are grieving as a Department as our thoughts and prayers are with Officer Hashida’s family and friends,” the department said, noting he joined in 2003. Two other officers have died by suicide following the insurrection: Howard Liebengood and Jeffery Smith. Another, Brian Sicknick, died a day after he engaged with rioters while responding to the attack. Several officers who responded to the Jan. 6 riot spoke before Congress about the day’s events last week, detailing the horrors of the day and the ongoing mental anguish they’ve sustained. Some testified that they believed they might have died
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Photos posted by right-wing Rep. Madison Cawthorn (R-N.C.) are triggering speculation that he could be part of a mysterious shadow “Cabinet” in Donald Trump’s pretend presidency recently exposed by former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows. Cawthorn tweeted photos of himself at a conference room table at Trump’s Bedminster golf club in New Jersey with the former president and “business leaders.”  “On Saturday, I hosted a round table with special guest [former] President Donald Trump and several key business leaders to create a path forward to victory for the country and to
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Though Meghan McCain appeared on “The View” Monday, she was notably absent from a segment with Mary Trump, who accused the conservative co-host of lacking the courage to face her. “It’s a shame that your colleague didn’t have the courage to come on and have this conversation with me,” Trump told the other co-hosts during a discussion about her uncle, former President Donald Trump, and his successful use of racism as a political platform. “But I appreciate that you were all willing to take up these very difficult subjects because racism, in my view, is at the heart of everything
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A Sudanese official has said local authorities in Kassala province have found around 50 bodies, apparently people fleeing the war in neighbouring Ethiopia’s Tigray region, floating in the river between the countries over the past week.Some bodies were found with gunshot wounds or their hands bound, and the official said on Monday a forensic investigation was needed to determine the causes of death. The official spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity because he was not authorised to brief the media.Two Ethiopian health workers in the Sudan border community of Hamdayet confirm
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At least 70% of adults in the US have now received at least one Covid-19 vaccination shot, the White House announced on Monday, reaching a target Joe Biden originally said he had hoped to achieve by 4 July.The administration reported the news in a tweet hailing “Milestone Monday” by Cyrus Shahpar, the government’s Covid-19 data director, who said the seven-day average of people receiving their first dose – 320,000 – was the highest since the Independence Day holiday.Health and government officials have in recent days painted the resurgence of coronavirus as a “pandemic of the unvaccinated”, highlighting that areas of the country with the most spread were those with lower than average vaccination rates, and almost all hospitalizations and deaths are now among those declining t
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And now we’ve done the day for Australia, we may as well look at US chances/highlights. 9pm EDT/2am EDT: men’s 3m springboard semi-final/final A total of 18 divers will compete in the morning semi-final, and the top 12 scorers advance to the afternoon final. One American, Andrew Capobianco, qualified for the semi; he won a silver in the synchronized event last week. Capobianco, 21, finished 17th in the preliminary round. 9.50pm EDT: women’s long jump final Two Americans, Brittney Reese and Tara Davis, qualified for the long jump final, competing in a field of 12. Reese is ranked No 5 in the world, Davis No 15, but Davis is having a career year. The Americans will face stiff competition if they hope to medal; the top four jumpers in the world ahead of Reese qualified for
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It is a long list that includes travellers, cyclists, animal rights activists, lorry drivers, George Michael and Liverpool. Now Jeremy Clarkson has opened himself up to more anger after he criticised “those communists at Sage” preventing opening up because, he argues, “if you die, you die.”In an interview with the Radio Times, Clarkson gives his views on the pandemic and what should happen next. Many will find his thoughts typically boorish and insensitive.“When it started, I read up on pandemics and they tend to be four years long,” he said.“I think the politicians should sometimes tell those communists at Sage to get back in their box. Let’s just all go through life with our fingers crossed and a smile on our face. I can see Boris doesn’t want to open it up and shut us
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Guardian writers’ predicted position: 18th (NB: this is not necessarily Ben Fisher’s prediction but the average of our writers’ tips)Last season’s position: 3rd in the ChampionshipOdds to win the league (via Oddschecker): 750-1The planThese are exciting times at Brentford. A couple of months on from Thomas Frank being ambushed by his players during his pitchside interviews at Wembley, and conducting his press conference with a towel draped over his shoulders, it is time for a club that outperformed heavyweight rivals in the Championship to put to the test in the biggest league in the world an intriguing theory built on smart thinking and shrewd recruitment.How will they measure up? Everything points to Brentford being a welcome addition to the Premier League. They play a punchy, fr
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She is a spirited, Titian-haired, freckled beauty, whose curls just won’t quit. While initially submitting to the strictures of high society and the tribulations of the marriage market, she endures a pasting from the press before emerging triumphant, throwing off the weight of expectations to become her true self. And write a children’s book.The heroine of the Duchess of York’s debut novel for adults, Lady Margaret Montagu Douglas Scott, bears no small resemblance to its author, in both looks and life story. Her Heart for a Compass is out on Tuesday from romance publisher Mills & Boon, but readers hoping for the sexy shenanigans usually found in the publisher’s output will be disappointed. While Margaret indulges in a handful of kisses, and at one point has a man “adjusting his k
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Smoking causes almost twice as many cancer cases among the poor than the well-off, according to new findings that underline the close link between cigarettes and deprivation.About 11,247 cases of cancer caused by smoking are diagnosed among the poorest 20% of people in England each year, but far fewer – 6,200 – among those in the top 20% income bracket.Cancer Research UK, which produced the estimates, said the findings underlined why ministers should impose a levy on tobacco firms to help fund the cost of helping tobacco addicts to quit.“It’s very concerning that smoking causes more cancer cases in more deprived groups,” said Michelle Mitchell, Cancer Research UK’s chief executive.The difference in cancer incidence between rich and poor is so great that, combined with cuts to s
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Teenagers in Wales may be able to vote at their own schools and colleges during breaks from lessons, and shoppers could exercise their democratic right while they are picking up their groceries, under new proposals from the Welsh government.The Labour-led administration is working with local authorities in an effort to introduce pilot schemes of more flexible voting at next year’s council elections.Voting in different spaces is being considered in order to give the electorate access to the ballot box in familiar environments.Routinely setting up polling stations in secondary schools and colleges is seen as a way of giving young people better access to democracy, following legislation giving 16- and 17-year-olds the vote in Wales. Consideration is also being given to other sites, such as
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Opinion|‘Freedom,’ Florida and the Delta Variant Disasterhttps://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/02/opinion/Covid-Florida-vaccines.htmlPaul KrugmanAug. 2, 2021, 7:00 p.m. ETCredit...Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesRon DeSantis, governor of Florida, isn’t stupid. He is, however, ambitious and supremely cynical. So when he says things that sound stupid it’s worth asking why. And his recent statements on Covid-19 help us understand why so many Americans are still dying or getting severely ill from the disease.The background here is Florida’s unfolding public health catastrophe.We now have highly effective vaccines freely available to every American who is at least 12 years old. There has been a lot of hype about “breakthrough” infections associated with the Delta variant, but they remain rare, a
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It’s a moment every athlete at the Olympic Games has dreamed about: standing on the podium and bowing their head to receive a well-earned medal around their neck. However, things looked a little different in Tokyo this year. Due to COVID-19 protocols, Olympic officials have been presenting medals on a tray for the athletes to don themselves. Ahead of the Games, International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach told reporters the policy would mean “that the athlete can be sure that nobody touched them before.” But in a sweet show of sportsmanship, athletes at the Tokyo Games — especially in events with more than one person on a team — have been placing medals on one another, making for some touching, photo-worthy moments. In an Olympics where COVID-19 has forced so much to c
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The White House said on Monday that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was “unable to find legal authority for a new, targeted eviction moratorium” and asked instead that states and local governments put in policies to keep renters in their homes.Mass evictions could potentially worsen the recent spread of the Covid-19 Delta variant but an avalanche of people being made to leave their abodes is feared, as roughly 1.4m households told the Census Bureau they could “very likely” be evicted from their rentals in the next two months.Another 2.2m say they’re “somewhat likely” to be evicted. The prospect of mass evictions has led to criticism that the Biden administration was slow to address the end of the moratorium, which expired over the weekend.But the White Ho
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Spending more time indoors and on screens because of Covid restrictions may be linked to an increased rate of short-sightedness in children, researchers say.The study, which looked at two groups of children aged six to eight in Hong Kong, is the latest to suggest that lockdowns and other restrictions may have taken a toll on eyesight: data from more than 120,000 children of a similar age in China, published earlier this year, suggested a threefold increase in the prevalence of shortsightedness, or myopia, in 2020.Dr Jason Yam of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a co-author of the new study, said “near work” – such as reading, writing or watching TV – is believed to be a risk factor for myopia, while increased outdoor time has been consistently shown to have a protective role.Ho
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The jerk is back. “Do I look like a terrorist?” he asks airport security as he returns from his native US to Britain. Tim has cerebral palsy and is twitchier than your average nervous suicide bomber. “Actually, you do,” the functionary replies. “You look like you might have been blown up by one of your own badly made devices.”Is it OK to laugh at such an evidently disablist joke? Perhaps. After all, it was co-written by Tim Renkow, who has cerebral palsy, in a BBC One sitcom about a character called Tim who has cerebral palsy. What’s clear is that Renkow isn’t writing a show that makes for easy viewing. Renkow plays the eponymous jerk who revels in making the able-bodied feel uncomfortable.Sometimes there are easier laughs. It’s clearly OK to laugh at Britain’s border c
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Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) announced Monday that he has tested positive for COVID-19 and is showing symptoms of the disease, while expressing gratitude that he has been vaccinated. “I feel like I have a sinus infection and at present time I have mild symptoms,” he tweeted. “I am very glad I was vaccinated because without vaccination I am certain I would not feel as well as I do now. My symptoms would be far worse.” The 66-year-old said he started having flu-like symptoms on Saturday night and went to see a doctor Monday morning. He was seen at the U.S. Capitol on Monday wearing a mask before making his announcement on social media. Graham said he will quarantine for 10 days. I was just informed by the House physician I have tested positive for #COVID19 even after being vaccinated. I started having flu-like symptoms Saturday night and went to the doctor this morning.— Lindsey Graham (@LindseyGrahamSC) August 2, 2021 Health officials ask that people who feel sick stay at home, unless they are seeking medical care, to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. They should separate themselves from other people, wear a face mask if possible, and call ahead before visiting their doctor. CNN’s Manu Raju tweeted that over the weekend, Graham attended a houseboat party hosted by Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.). A spokesperson for Manchin declined to confirm Graham’s attendance to HuffPost, but said that Manchin, 73, is fully vaccinated and is following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines for people exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. It’s extremely rare for vaccinated people to contract the virus, though it is still possi
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Guest EssayAug. 2, 2021, 5:19 p.m. ETCredit...Illustration by The New York Times, Photograph by Getty ImagesElisabeth Rosenthal and Glenn KramonDr. Rosenthal is the editor in chief of Kaiser Health News. She was an emergency room physician before becoming a journalist. Mr. Kramon is a lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and has reported on health insurance.America’s Covid-19 vaccination rate is at around 60 percent, for ages twelve and up. That’s not enough to reach so-called herd immunity, and in states like Missouri — where a number of counties have vaccination rates under 25 percent — hospitals are overwhelmed by serious outbreaks of the more contagious Delta variant.The vaccine resisters offer all kinds of reasons for refusing the free shots and for ignoring efforts to nudge them to get vaccinated. Campaigns urging Americans to get vaccinated for their health, for their grandparents, for their neighbors, to get free doughnuts or a free joint haven’t done the trick. States have even held lotteries with a chance to win millions or a college scholarship.And yet there are still huge numbers of unvaccinated people. Federal, state and municipal governments, as well as private businesses continue to largely avoid mandates for their employees out of fears they will provoke a backlash.So, how about an economic argument? Get a Covid-19 shot to protect your wallet.Getting hospitalized with Covid-19 in the United States typically generates huge bills. Those submitted by Covid patients to the NPR-Kaiser Health News “Bill of the Month” project include a $17,000 bill for a brief hospital stay in Marietta, GA (reduced to about $4,000 for an uninsured pa
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People under the age of 21 could get a chance to work as long-haul truck drivers thanks to a bipartisan infrastructure bill that could soon pass the U.S. Senate.   After weeks of negotiations, senators over the weekend finally released the legislative text of their bill, which would allocate more than $500 billion to fix up roads and bridges, improve passenger rail and expand broadband internet access. The bill would also establish an apprenticeship program that would let 18- to 21-year-olds cross state lines in 18-wheelers ― a small win for the freight industry on top of the bill’s $100 billion investment in roadways.  “Americans, and the hardworking men and women who carry this economy on trucks, have waited long enough for Washington to act on our decaying infrastructure,” Chris Spear, president of the American Trucking Associations, said last week as lawmakers finalized their deal. Federal law requires commercial truckers to be at least 21 years old for interstate commerce, but the trucking industry has long complained of a labor shortage, saying there aren’t enough drivers willing to work for prevailing pay rates. The ATA has lobbied for years to expand its labor pool by lowering the age limit through an apprenticeship program similar to the one in the bill.  According to the legislation, apprentices would have to be at least 18 and must already have commercial driver’s licenses. They would undergo weeks of additional training, and would only be allowed to drive trucks with active braking collision mitigation systems and forward-facing video cameras. The apprenticeship program would enroll 3,000 drivers under the age of 21 at a time, and the Department of Transportation would evaluate their safety records compared to those of non-truck drivers in a report to Congress in three years. Safety could be a concern. When it comes to regular cars, drivers aged 16 to 19 are nearly three times likelier to be involved in fatal crashes than drivers 20 and older, according to the nonprofit Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, though the risk is greatest for drivers aged 16 and 17. Large trucks were involved in only 12% of crashes in 2019. As for truc
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INDEPENDENCE, Ohio ― After more than eight months of campaigning, former Ohio state Sen. Nina Turner (D) is tired of worrying about what her establishment detractors think. Speaking to an audience of progressive clergy members on Monday, Turner imitated the politicians and pundits who keep telling her to tone it down. “‘Senator, don’t say this. Senator, don’t say that.’ Dammit ― I’m over it!” she declared to applause at an interfaith breakfast. In fact, Turner welcomed the discomfort of her adversaries ― whether they are in Democratic Party leadership in Washington, or in the highest echelons of corporate America. “We got some folks rattled,” Turner said. “But I’m glad they’re rattled. I want them to be uncomfortable.” “Why is it that the poverty pimps get to be comfortable ― and the poor people uncomfortable?” she added. “Well, it’s time to make them uncomfortable. Hello somebody!” On Tuesday, Turner will face off against Cuyahoga County Councilwoman Shontel Brown (D) in a special primary election to succeed Marcia Fudge, in Ohio’s 11th Congressional District, a majority-Black seat that includes parts of Cleveland and Akron. The seat opened up when President Joe Biden tapped Fudge to serve as Housing and Urban Development Secr
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The Premier League is to try to end the art of “buying” a penalty, as it announced tougher refereeing criteria for deciding spot-kicks.When the 2021-22 season begins, referees are to assess three criteria before deciding whether a penalty should be awarded for a foul challenge. Officials must first consider the degree of contact experienced by the attacking player, then the consequence of that contact, before finally taking into account the motivation of the attacker in reacting to the challenge.The Premier League’s head of refereeing, Mike Riley, said the decision to change the guidance on penalties followed conversations with top‑flight clubs and players, all of whom wanted spot-kicks awarded only for “proper fouls”. It also comes after a record 125 penalties were awarded in the top flight last season.“Referees will look for contact and establish clear contact, then ask themselves the question: does that contact have a consequence?” Riley said. “They will then ask themselves a question: has the player used that contact to actually try and win a foul penalty? So it’s not sufficient just to say: ‘Yes, there’s contact.’“I think that the feedback we’ve had from players, both attackers and defenders, [is that] you want it to be a proper foul that has a consequence, not something that somebody has used slight to contact to go over, and we’ve given the penalty to reward it.”Riley said he hoped the rules would help to persuade players to stay on their feet in the box. Under the new guidance, the penalty Raheem Sterling won for England against Denmark in the Euro 2020 semi-final would not have been given and, if it had, the decision would be expected to be overturned by VAR.Riley confirmed this season there will be revisions for the video refereeing technology, with changes to the way it interprets offside decisions set to benefit the attacking team.VAR assesses whether a player is offside in the buildup to a goal as part of its four key checks but has been criticised for ruling out goals on the tiniest of margins. New rules will apply a different approach, with a final decision made not using the one-pixel-wide lines of the VAR, but t
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Neanderthals, long perceived to have been unsophisticated and brutish, really did paint stalagmites in a Spanish cave more than 60,000 years ago, according to a study published on Monday.The issue had roiled the world of paleoarchaeology ever since the publication of a 2018 paper attributing red ocher pigment found on the stalagmitic dome of Cueva de Ardales to our extinct “cousin” species.The dating suggested the art was at least 64,800 years old, made at a time when modern humans did not inhabit the continent.But the finding was contentious, and “a scientific article said that perhaps these pigments were a natural thing”, a result of iron oxide flow, Francesco d’Errico, co-author of a new paper in the journal PNAS, told AFP.Pigment on a coloured stalagmite in the Spanish cave of Ardales, southern Spain. Photograph: Joao Zilhao/ICREA/AFP/Getty ImagesA new analysis revealed the composition and placement of the pigments were not consistent with natural processes – rather, the pigments were applied through splattering and blowing.What’s more, their texture did not match natural samples taken from the caves, suggesting the pigments came from an external source.More detailed dating showed that the pigments were applied at different points in time, separated by more than 10,000 years.This “supports the hypothesis that the Neanderthals came on several occasions, over several thousand years, to mark the cave with pigments”, said d’Errico, of the University of Bordeaux.It is difficult to compare the Neanderthal “art” with wall paintings made by prehistoric modern humans, such as those found in the Chauvet-Pont d’Arc cave of France, more 30,000 years old.But the new finding adds to increasing evidence that Neanderthals, whose lineage went extinct approximately 40,000 years ago, were not the boorish relatives of Homo sapiens they were long portrayed to be.The team wrote that the pigments are not “art” in the narrow sense of the word “but rather the result of graphic behaviors intent on perpetuating the symbolic significance of a space”.The cave formations “played a fundamental role in the symbolic systems of some Neanderthal communities
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Tan France is kicking off August as a doting, first-time dad.  The “Queer Eye” star on Monday revealed that he and his husband, Rob France, welcomed a baby boy, Ismail, via a surrogate on July 10.  “Give our son a warm welcome,” the Netflix series’ fashion guru wrote on Instagram alongside an adorable photo showing the family of three. “He came seven weeks early, so he’s been in the NICU for the past three weeks. But, today, we finally got to bring him home.” “We love him so, so much,” he added. “Like, fully obsessed.”   Rob France shared a similar image on his
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A third police officer who defended the US Capitol during the 6 January insurrection by extremist supporters of Donald Trump has taken his own life, Washington DC’s Metropolitan police department confirmed on Monday.Officer Gunther Hashida, who was assigned to the emergency response team within the special operations department, was found dead at home on 29 July, the department said.Hashida, 44, joined the force in May 2003 and was among those who responded to the Capitol attack, spokesperson Brianna Burch confirmed to the Guardian.“We are grieving as a department and our thoughts and pray
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The good news: An initial deluge of explicit porn featuring Sonic the Hedgehog is gone. The bad news: It’s been replaced by ISIS propaganda. Such are the travails of Gettr, the pro-Trump, anti-censorship Twitter clone launched by former Trump spokesperson Jason Miller last month. An investigation by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, a think tank that tracks extremism online, found Islamic State supporters are using the nascent social network to distribute graphic videos and other terrorist propaganda, putting Gettr’s commitment to free speech ― and its moderation system ― to the test. The jihadi accounts were first flagged by Moustafa Ayad, the organization’s executive director for Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Ayad told HuffPost that ISIS supporters used Facebook to coordinate a “raid and occupy” campaign targeting Gettr on July 6, with the first batch of 20 accounts coming online within 24 hours later. Those 20 accounts pushed around 300 pieces of propaganda on Gettr within the first week and then “spawned exponentially” to circumvent moderation efforts. They’ve since grown to at least 250 active accounts disseminating content that includes calls for violence and beheading videos, a Politico tally found. ISIS supporters have put forth a concentrated effort in the past few months to “seed and grow” communities of support, Ayad said. The targeting of conservative and far-right platforms is a deliberate tactic: Compared to Facebook, these platforms often have limited resources to combat the problem, and by simply having a presence there, the Islamic State can claim a media win by “owning” a conservative space. Screengrabs of the jihadi content the Institute for Strategic Dialogue shared with HuffPost show that the earliest posts, while problematic, had minimal interaction. Other disturbing content, like white supremacist propaganda, likely has a far greater reach, said Emerson Brooking, a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab, which studies disinformation online. “Because of the way Gettr is constructed, it is difficult to quantify how popular a subject is,” Brooking told HuffPost in an email. “In my examination of the platform, however, I found these ISIS fan accounts to have a relatively small reach. Some of these accounts seem to have been manually removed by Gettr after they were
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Rapper DaBaby has issued an apology to the LGBTQ community after his homophobic remarks at a July 25 concert in Miami resulted in him being dropped from several music festivals. “I want to apologize to the LGBTQ+ community for the hurtful and triggering comments I made,” DaBaby posted on Instagram Monday. “Again, I apologize for my misinformed comments about HIV/AIDS and I know education on this is important.” The Grammy-nominated rapper, born Jonathan Lyndale Kirk, has come under fire after making a series of derogatory statements about women, gay men and people living with HIV during a performance at Miami’s Rolling Loud Festival. Among other things, he told the crowd: “If you didn’t show up today with HIV, AIDS, or any of them deadly sexually transmitted diseases, that’ll make you die in two to three weeks, then put your cellphone lighter up ... Fellas, if you ain’t sucking dick in the parking lot, put your cellphone lighter up.” DaBaby later addressed the controversy on Twitter, writing: “Anybody who done ever been effected by AIDS/HIV y’all got the right to be upset, what I said was insensitive even though I have no intentions on offending anybody. So my apologies.” He stopped short of apologizing to the LGBTQ community, however, telling them: “I ain’t trippin on y’all, do you. y’all business is y’all business.” DaBaby appeared unfazed by the ongoing backlash in the following days, advertising upcoming concerts and music videos on social media and sharing Instagram stories that showed him dancing in a car and riding in what appeared to be a private jet. But he was dropped from headlining Chicago’s Lollapalooza Music Festiv
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The U.S. on Monday finally reached President Joe Biden’s goal of getting at least one COVID-19 shot in the arms of 70% of American adults ― a month late and amid a fierce surge by the delta variant that is swamping hospitals and leading to new mask rules and mandatory vaccinations around the country. Louisiana ordered nearly everyone, vaccinated or not, to wear masks again in all indoor public settings, including schools and colleges, and other cities and states likewise moved to reinstate precautions to counter a crisis blamed on the fast-spreading variant and stubborn resistance to getting the vaccine. “As fast as we are opening up units, they’re being filled with COVID patients,” lamented Dr. Sergio Segarra, chief medical officer of Baptist Hospital Miami, where the Florida chain reported an increase of well over 140% in the past two weeks in the number of people now hospitalized with the virus. “As quickly as we can discharge them they’re coming in and they’re coming in very sick. We started seeing entire families come down.” Biden had set a goal of reaching the 70% threshold by the Fourth of July. But that target was set well before the highly contagious delta variant enabled the virus to come storming back and undermined the assumptions that were used to arrive at that figure. There was was no celebration at the White House on Monday, nor a setting of a new target, as the administration instead struggles to overcome public resistance. The 70% target m
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Treating yourself to fancy items is possible, even if you don’t feel like spending an arm and leg on something new. Whether you’re looking to add a touch of glam to an outfit or spruce up your home with elegant decor, it’s so easy to achieve a luxe aesthetic for less. From customized jewelry to Art Deco-inspired notebooks, here are some affordable dupes for high-end goods. HuffPost may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Prices and availability subject to change.A set of liquid flower pensThey'll look so pretty on your desk and you'll love using them to jot down notes.Promising review: "These are beautiful pens! I bought them to gift my mom for her birthday to go with a journal I bought her. They write seamlessly, no skipping. And they are good heavy weight. The rose gold is beautiful and the little flowers are amazing!" — AngelaGet a five-piece set from Amazon for $14.99.A rose gold water bottleDrink H2O out of this eye-catching container with a one-click-to-open design. It'll be a sleek upgrade from your old water tumbler.Promising review: "I've been using this water bottle a whole bunch and I love it! The handle on top is extremely helpful for carrying the bottle when your hands are full. The design of the bottle is pretty cool and the oval shape fits just perfectly in my hand. It's well-built and sturdy and I love the rubber on the bottom, which makes it more stable on slick surfaces and also ensures it won't damage wood or any kind of surface. It's like it has its own built-in coaster. " — Amazon CustomerGet it from Amazon for $35.A tube of La Roche-Posay balmApply it to your face, hands and lips to smooth out dry areas and moisturize thirsty skin. Promising review: "Just wow! I'm blown away by this product. Really helps heal the skin when it gets compromised! I usually can't wear balms, because they usually break out my extremely acne-prone, oily skin. However, this one does not break me out. I sometimes over-do it with my acne medication and a night of this balm slapped on recovers my skin back to normal." — Sarah KGet it from Amazon for $14.99. A gentle cleansing oilTake off stubborn makeup with this oil-based cleanser that requires no scrubbing.Promising review: "I used this cleanser in place of a makeup remover, and it almost disintegrated my makeup for me. In fact,it took off my waterproof mascara like it was nothing! There was no burning or feeling of scrubbing like every other makeup remover I've ever used." — AshleyGet it from Amazon for $12.95.A set of minimalist toothbrushesGet your pearly whites squeaky clean with a toothbrush that's functional (it has charcoal-infused bristles) and aesthetically pleasing. Promising review: "These are amazing! So soft and gentle on the gums. The plastic is a nice matte but does not scratch as a bamboo toothbrush does. And the design is super slick and modern, so I'm able to display my toothbrush on the vanity instead of trying to always hide it. It actually matches my bathroom design!" — Amazon CustomerGet a four-pack from Amazon for $9.90.A FaceTory K-beauty subscription boxEnjoy a curated selection of four face masks each month for your self-care rout
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guest essayJuly 31, 2021Emily OsterDr. Oster is a professor of economics at Brown University and the author of “The Family Firm: A Data-Driven Guide to Better Decision Making in the Early School Years,” from which this essay is adapted.When we become parents, we expect to be many things: someone who wakes in the middle of the night and who cleans up food from the floor; someone who comforts, who loves, who disciplines, who celebrates. What we perhaps did not expect is to take on the job of logistics manager. It creeps up on us as children age. The floor may get cleaner and the midnight wake-ups less frequent, but in their place is the stress of competing demands on our children’s time and ours. Which school to go to and how to get there? Is evening math tutoring necessary? What do we do about summer camp? How can three children with two parents be at three birthday parties on Saturday at 2 p.m.?Making these questions more challenging is that they feel weightier than early parenting choices, that they matter more in the long term and that making a mistake is somehow worse. On top of this, an older child has more demands and more opinions. The decisions feel important and hard, and many parents feel lost as to how to make them well.Consider this: One day, your 9-year-old daughter arrives home with the exciting news that she has been invited to join the travel soccer team. She really wants to do it. In fact, she insists, if you do not let her, you will literally ruin her life.It’s easy to think of this as a question about soccer, about one activity. But it’s not; it’s a question of priorities. The soccer team may have four evening practices a week and one weekend day (at least!) spent at tournaments. If you say yes, this will take over a lot of your days. (Of course, if you say no, you’ll ruin your daughter’s life.)For many of us, the pandemic has brought these decisions into a new light. During lockdown, we turned off so much of what we were doing. As families re-emerge, there is an opportunity to choose what we actually want to return to. Our schedules are blank slates, waiting for us to design them in a way that we might like better. At the same time, we have to make all those difficult choices anew.Early parenting experiences haven’t necessarily prepared us. With a baby, so much is immediate. With toddlers or older children, most parents know that “giving in to the loudest whining” isn’t the best way to decide, but it’s hard to know what to replace that with.In my own case, I made a business of using data to make decisions in early parenting — relying heavily on what science said about the choices I was considering. Unfortunately for me, the data approach is incomplete when the logistics of a household with older children come into the picture. I found myself scrounging for any scrap of data that might help, and then making decisions sometimes almost at random, often at the last minute. The haphazard aspect of this process was stressful. Not having a plan resulted in what felt like an avoidable fuss.And then I realized, there are better ways to do this.Taking a cue from my past life as a business school professor,
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Dizzee Rascal, the award-winning rapper and producer whose real name is Dylan Mills, has been charged with assaulting a woman following a domestic argument.In a statement, the Metropolitan police said: “Dylan Mills, 36, of Sevenoaks, Kent, has been charged with assault after an incident at a residential address in Streatham on 8 June. Officers attended and a woman reported minor injuries. She did not require hospital treatment.”Mills, who is currently on bail, is due to appear at Croydon magistrates court on Friday 3 September.A pioneer of grime music, Mills was just 18 when his debut, Boy in da Corner, was released in 2003.He teamed up with Calvin Harris and embraced EDM for his fourth
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A third officer who responded to the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol has died by suicide, police confirmed Monday.  The officer, Gunther Hashida of D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department, was found deceased in his home Thursday.  “We are grieving as a Department as our thoughts and prayers are with Officer Hashida’s family and friends,” the department said of Hashida, who joined the MPD in 2003.  Hashida is one of four officers who have died since a mob spurred on by then-President Donald Trump descended on the Capitol. Two of them, Howard Liebengood and Jeffery Smith, died by suicide, and another, Brian Sicknick, died the day after he engaged with rioters. While the MPD confir
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Firefighters made progress battling some of the largest fires burning across the west, but dangers of flare-ups and new ignitions remain amid hot, dry conditions that will bake the parched landscape.Nine large fires have collectively burned more than 1.8m acres in 12 states, the National Interagency Fire Center reported on Monday morning, including 23 in Montana, some of which have displayed extreme fire behavior.On Sunday, the agency issued its monthly outlook, forecasting “significant wildland fire potential” with more than 95% of the American west in drought and more than half of the region in the two highest categories of drought conditions, and hotter than normal weather expected to
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The proposal would overhaul America’s approach to tackling outbreaks, allowing scientists to develop vaccines in advance. But for now, Democrats are cutting it down.Dr. Anthony Fauci has long pushed for reforms included in the $30 billion plan. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)President Joe Biden campaigned as America’s pandemic fighter. So it will be strange, to say the least, if his infrastructure bill fails to significantly increase the country’s pandemic-preparedness budget.But it could happen. Biden proposed $30 billion to address the issue, which advocates say could permanently mitigate the risks of future outbreaks. The investment would replenish medical stockpiles, proactively develop vac
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Rassie Erasmus is poised to continue in his role as South Africa’s director of rugby for the decisive third Test of the British & Irish Lions series despite World Rugby finally announcing disciplinary proceedings against him for misconduct on Monday night.World Rugby has confirmed that Erasmus, and the South Africa union, will face a disciplinary hearing after an hour-long video emerged last week in which he picks apart Nic Berry’s refereeing performance in the first Test – won 22-17 by the Lions. It is understood, however, that the hearing is highly likely to take place after the deciding Test on Saturday, after the Springboks levelled the series last weekend, leaving Erasmus free to
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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Health officials in San Francisco and six other Bay Area counties announced Monday that they are reinstating a mask mandate for all indoor settings as COVID-19 infections surge because of the highly contagious delta variant. The new mandate — which applies to everyone, regardless of their vaccination status — will take effect on Tuesday in San Francisco, Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Sonoma counties and in the city of Berkeley. The health officers also recommended that people gather outdoors if they have that option. “The virus doesn’t care what type of indoor space you’re in,” said Dr. George Han, deputy health officer in Santa Cla
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The past year and a half has been long, hard and logistically bonkers for families with young kids at home.While the pandemic certainly isn’t over, many parents do feel a huge sense of relief as we inch closer to what looks like (for now, at least) a more typical school year. Groups such as the American Academy of Pediatrics and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have called for kids around the country to return to the classroom. At the same time, many parents who haven’t already returned to the office for work will likely do so to some degree this fall.Although being able to slide back into old routines might feel pretty darn glorious, economist and parenting guru Emily Oster suggests that doing so without pausing to consider your family’s “big picture” is a mistake.Oster’s new book, “The Family Firm: A Data-Driven Guide to Better Decision Making in the Early School Years,” provides a framework for parents of 5- to 12-year-olds when it comes to making decisions on everything from nutrition to when kids should get their first phones. She believes this is a moment when many families would benefit from creating mission statements — and she’s got a practical guide for what they should entail.“With all of the terrible things that have gone on over the past 18 months, there is an opportunity, as we move out of this, to have important conversations even in families where routines have been long established,” the author told HuffPost. “What are the things we were doing before that we want to go back to? What are the things we were doing before that we think, ‘You know what? Actually, I didn’t miss that.’ It is a real opportunity for that kind of reflection to happen.”What your family mission statement should includeThe purpose of a family mission statement is really to help you and whoever else you parent with articulate your big, high-level values. But Oster doesn’t see it as simply a lofty expression of ideals. Instead, it’s a practical document that will help your family sort through parenting decisions every day.“When I talk about creating the family Big Picture, I’m talking about these overall principles,” Oster writes in “The Family Firm.” “But I’m also talking about confronting, ‘What does Thursday night look like?’”To start, everyone who is a parenting stakeholder in your family should get a piece of paper. Write down an overarching family mission statement in a single sentence. Next, jot down three main goals for your children.“Big life goals,” Oster writes in her book. “Not like, ‘Use a fork better,’ even if you desperately, desperately want that.”After that, it’s time to think about yourself. What are three priorities you want to make sure you get time for? Write those down.Then, list three activities that are must-dos for your family on most weekdays. Oster’s, for example, include eating at least one meal with the kids, getting some work done and being around for bedtime.Finally, list three activities you think of as must-dos on the weekend. Sports? Spending time with family? Religious activities? “There’s an important distinction between woo-woo, kind
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The only simple element in US group Parker Hannifin’s £6.3bn bid for Coventry-based defence and aerospace business Meggitt is the takeover premium: an offer at 71% more than last week’s share price counts as fat by any measure. UK investors, once again, have been guilty of seriously undervaluing a FTSE 250 industrial company. Meggitt’s line of work – brakes, sensors, valves, fuel tanks and other components for commercial and military aircraft – may not be glamorous, but will endure beyond current pandemic upsets.The tricky part is the “legally binding commitments to HM Government
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History was made on a Tokyo evening of superhuman strength and simmering tension as Laurel Hubbard, a 43‑year‑old weightlifter from New Zealand, became the first openly trans woman athlete to compete at an Olympic Games.But Hubbard, who was born male but began identifying as a woman in 2013, buckled under pressure of the world’s gaze, as well as the weight of the huge bar she was trying to thrust over her head. Twice the barbell, which had 120kg and then 125kg on it, fell behind her after she had snatched it powerfully from the floor. On another occasion Hubbard got it off the ground and
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British swimming Olympians have landed back in the UK from Tokyo after returning from their most successful Games.Team GB finished third in the swimming medal table behind the US and Australia. They won eight medals this past week. The squad returned with a haul of four golds, beating the UK’s previous best performance, at the 1908 Games in London.They also brought back three silvers and a bronze, bettering their previous best tally in the pool of seven.Medal performances in Tokyo included gold and a world record in the first ever Olympic mixed 4x100m medley relay, a historic gold and silver for Tom Dean and Duncan Scott in the 200m freestyle – the first time since 1908 that Britain have secured a first and second finish in the Olympic pool – and gold for Adam Peaty in the 100m breaststroke, which saw him become the first Briton to defend an Olympic swimming title.With one gold and three silvers, Scott also became the first British athlete from any sport to win four medals at one Olympic Games.At a press conference at Heathrow airport, Peaty, who said he was still annoyed not to have beaten the US in the medley relay, said the British team were “no longer scared of winning” and other countries now knew they were the ones to beat. He also said he had been “handed champagne all the way home” and had not had time to reflect on his victory yet.“I’m going to take a few months off from the sport,” Peaty added. “I’ve been pushing for so long, so it’s an outrageous amount of effort from not only myself but from my team. To be part of this team is very special.”Earlier he said: “I’m so proud to be part of this incredible team. We all support each other in and out of the pool and our success is down to this and the amazing support from everyone involved.“My goal was to defend my Olympic title and I achieved that, but it was about so much more than me – I did it for my country, my son and my family and for all those people who need a bit of light.”He said the support of the national lottery had played a “huge part” in the success. “I came on the World Class Performance Programme in 2012 and that support has helped get me where I am today and ensures that I continued to benefit from best-in-class training facilities and a world-class coach in Mel Marshall,” he said. “It’s that backing that has helped the whole team deliver in Tokyo.”Jack Buckner, chief executive of British Swimming, agreed and said: “The national lottery funding has been absolutely critical to the success and the outstanding performances we have seen in the pool in Tokyo. A little bit of those medals belongs to everyone who has bought a national lottery ticket, because without them we wouldn’t have even been able to get a team on a plane to Tokyo.”Buckner said the funding and support had been particularly valuable during the pandemic as they had to make some “big decisions on resources”. “The funding has transformed not just swimming but British Olympic and Paralympic sport and the foundations are there for swimming to enjoy continued success,” he said.Sally Munday, chief executive of UK Sport, said the team’s extraordin
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The Lollapalooza music festival in downtown Chicago will probably cause a surge in Covid-19 infections, said public health experts, after tens of thousands of people gathered there this past weekend.The four-day festival welcomed about 100,000 guests a day to hear headliners including Megan Thee Stallion, Foo Fighters and Tyler the Creator.To attend, people had to either provide a Covid-19 vaccine card or proof of a negative Covid-19 test from the previous 72 hours, but doctors said more restrictions should have been in place as the US tries to limit the spread of the more infectious Delta variant.Infectious disease expert Dr Tina Tan said: “When you have 100,000 or more people who are in a fairly enclosed space and there’s no social distancing, the vast majority are not wearing masks, you are going to get some transmission of Covid-19 Delta variant.”Chicago is averaging more than 200 new cases per day, a significant threshold identified by the city, though it is still far below the height of the pandemic. It could be two to three weeks before the effect of Lollapalooza on the city’s case rate is known, and there is also concern about people who visited the city for the festival spreading Covid at home.“I know they were trying to hold Lollapalooza as safely as possible but I think with the increasing amount of Covid we’ve been seeing there should have been some other things that were put into place,” said Tan, a professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.Tan said she was especially concerned that children under 12, who cannot get vaccinated, were at the festival and said there should have at least been a mask mandate.At this point in the pandemic, Tan said the only safe way to hold such a large music festival would be to do it virtually. To hold a similar event in-person safely, she said the crowd would have to be smaller, social distancing would need to be enforced, there would need to be a mask mandate and only vaccinated people could attend.In response to concerns raised in the weeks leading up to the event, Chicago’s mayor, Lori Lightfoot, said at a press conference on Sunday that millions of people had already attended events this summer in Chicago, including major league baseball games and smaller music festivals.“We’ve been able to open but do it with care because of the vaccinations,” she said. “So I feel very good about what we’ve done. Obviously, we’ll know a little bit more in a week to 10 days. But we have to keep pushing the fact that the unvaccinated are the people that are at risk.”On Thursday, Lollapalooza officials said 90% of the estimated 100,000 people who attended that day showed proof of vaccination. The festival also said it turned away 600 people who did not have the correct paperwork.But vaccinated people can still transmit the virus and vaccination cards and test results can be forged.Vashon Jordan Jr, a photo intern for the Chicago Tribune, covered the festival and said that fake Covid-19 vaccination cards were being used there. The Chicago division of the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) had earlier warned using fake vaccination cards was illeg
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The Siberian heatwave of 2020 led to new methane emissions from the permafrost, according to research. Emissions of the potent greenhouse gas are currently small, the scientists said, but further research is urgently needed.Analysis of satellite data indicated that fossil methane gas leaked from rock formations known to be large hydrocarbon reservoirs after the heatwave, which peaked at 6C above normal temperatures. Previous observations of leaks have been from permafrost soil or under shallow seas.Most scientists think the risk of a “methane bomb” – a rapid eruption of huge volumes of methane causing cataclysmic global heating – is minimal in the coming years. There is little evidence of significantly rising methane emissions from the Arctic and no sign of such a bomb in periods that were even hotter than today over the last 130,000 years.However, if the climate crisis worsens and temperatures continue to rise, large methane releases remain possibility in the long term and must be better understood, the scientists said.Methane is 84 times more powerful in trapping heat than carbon dioxide over a 20-year period and has caused about 30% of global heating to date. Its concentration in the atmosphere is now at two and a half times pre-industrial levels and continuing to rise, but most of this has come from fossil fuel exploitation, cattle, rice paddies and waste dumps.Prof Nikolaus Froitzheim, at Rhenish Friedrich Wilhelm University of Bonn, Germany, and who led the Siberian research, said: “We observed a significant increase in methane concentration starting last summer. This remained over the winter, so there must have been a steady steady flow of methane from the ground.“At the moment, these anomalies are not of a very big magnitude, but it shows there is something going on that was not observed before and the carbon stock [of fossil gas] is large.“We don’t know how dangerous [methane releases] are, because we don’t know how fast the gas can be released. It’s very important to know more about it,” Froitzheim said. If, at some point in the future, large global temperature rises lead to a big volume being released, “this methane would be the difference between catastrophe and apocalypse.”Methane releases have been considered a possible climate tipping point, in which emissions of the gas cause further warming, which in turn drives even more releases.However, Prof Gavin Schmidt, at Columbia University in the US, who was involved in the study, said it did not make a methane bomb any more likely: “There is simply no evidence for a big feedback in [climate records going back 130,000 years], when we know that the Arctic was still warmer than today. If temperatures exceed those levels, there aren’t any historical analogues we can use, but we are still some way from those levels.”The research, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, used satellite data to examine the Taymyr Peninsula and its surroundings in northern Siberia, which was hit by the world’s most extreme heat wave of 2020.The areas where methane emissions rose coincided very closely with the geological boundaries of limest
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Boris Johnson’s climate spokesperson has criticised the infrastructure that she says is putting people like her off switching to an electric car.Allegra Stratton, the prime minister’s former press secretary, revealed she drove a “third-hand” diesel Volkswagen Golf.The reason for this, Stratton explained in an interview with Times Radio, was that she needed to visit elderly relatives “200, 250 miles away”, and that having to stop the vehicle to charge it would slow the journey down, particularly with two young children who might otherwise remain asleep for the duration of the ride.“I don’t fancy it just yet,” said Stratton, who lives in north London, because of the length of
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The UK engineering firm Smiths Group has agreed to sell its medical division to the US private equity firm TA Associates in a $2.3bn (£1.7bn) deal, in the latest of a string of UK acquisitions by overseas buyers.Smiths Medical makes ventilators, syringe pumps and tracheostomy tubes for hospitals worldwide, and its sale effectively breaks up the FTSE 100-listed engineering conglomerate.Smiths, which helped to produce ventilators for the UK government early in the coronavirus pandemic, said the deal would help it focus on its core industrial technology business. It has been trying to spin off its medical arm for several years, either through a sale or demerger, but these efforts had been dela
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Recently, dozens of wildfires have erupted across southern and western Turkey as a dangerous heat wave lingers over southeastern Europe. For the past week, villages and resorts along the Mediterranean and Aegean coastlines have been overtaken by violent blazes that have killed at least eight people. High winds and scorching temperatures are driving the fires, forcing residents and tourists to evacuate by land or by sea. Read moreHints: View this page full screen. Skip to the next and previous photo by typing j/k or ←/→.
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A convicted terrorist who went on a knife rampage wearing a fake bomb belt within days of his release from jail was shot dead by officers following him, an inquest has heard.Police had tried to block the release of Sudesh Amman, 20, because of intelligence that he wanted to stage an attack, despite a prison sentence for terrorism offences.Days after his release, on 2 February, 2020, he staged a 62-second attack in Streatham, south London, wearing a fake suicide bomb belt, while he was being followed by armed surveillance officers.Det Supt Dominic Murphy told the inquest that Amman was arrested in May 2018 on suspicion of preparing and engaging in acts of terrorism.He was sentenced to 40 mont
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It started with Jimmy Savile and it ended nine years later in an airless courtroom in Birmingham.Daisy, now 45, was taken into care days after her birth and was adopted when she was seven months old. She had known since she read her social services files aged 18 that her birth mother was 13 years old when she was born and her birth father was Carvel Bennett, then 28. The files dating back to 1975 state: “The matter was investigated by police but never brought to court.”While the discovery was profoundly shocking and disturbing, it wasn’t until the scandal broke about Jimmy Savile’s prolific sex abuse – including the rape of dozens of children – that she decided to try to track do
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Thousands of households could lose their energy supplier this winter as small companies face the financial shock of record highs on the UK gas market and a key deadline to hand over renewable energy subsidies at the end of the month.The energy regulator is monitoring the finances of companies amid concerns that a string of small suppliers could go bust later in the year.Martin Young, an equity analyst at Investec, said a “combination of many” factors could lead companies to fail or become the target of an opportunistic acquisition by a larger rival.Some small providers, without a robust financial framework, may have been caught out by the steep gas market rises in recent months if they h
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Two days have passed since Congress and the White House allowed the federal eviction moratorium to lapse, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is still holding out hope that President Joe Biden will do something about it. Biden’s administration isn’t budging. In a letter to House Democrats Monday, Pelosi again said it was on the president’s administration to extend the moratorium as the delta variant of COVID-19 continues surging throughout the United States. “The money must flow, and the moratorium must be extended by the Administration,” Pelosi wrote, referring to rental assistance included in coronavirus relief legislation that hasn’t yet reached people who need it.  The White House has maintained it cannot act on the issue. The moratorium expired on Saturday. “On this particular issue, the president has not only kicked the tires, but double-, triple- and quadruple-checked,” Gene Sperling, a senior adviser to Biden, said Monday, adding that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been “unable to find legal authority” to extend the moratorium even in a more targeted manner. In an announcement Thursday that surprised lawmakers, the administration made clear it was up to Congress to extend the moratorium, citing a Supreme Court ruling from a month ago. The Supreme Court ruled in favor of allowing the federal eviction moratorium to stay in place through July, but indicated that any further extension would need congressional authorization. But with only three days’ notice, the House could not muster enough votes among Democrats alone to pass an extension, since Pelosi and other top Democratic lawmakers have called on the administration to just do it on its own. White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Monday afternoon that the White House is encouraging states and cities to establish their own eviction moratoriums for the next two months and urging landlords to delay evictions for at least 30 days. The White House is also looking into why states haven’t been able to distribute rental relief funds, approved by Congress last December and again in March, faster. Psaki’s comments came after a statement from Biden last Friday urging
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“I don’t understand why people come up with stuff like that. I just don’t get it. It’s very cruel.” Beatrice Masilingi is 18, born and raised in Katima in the Zambezi region of Namibia. In the humid bowels of Tokyo’s Olympic Stadium she was as excited as you might expect of any teenager who has barely raced outside her home country, who lists “my grandmother” as her key influence, and who had minutes earlier come cantering in behind Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce to make the women’s 200m Olympic final.If Masilingi was also a little wary, it is because she knows some part of the future is likely to take a difficult turn if she performs with the same level of grace and fire in Tuesday’s final. Masilingi is one of a pair of Namibian teenagers, schoolmates at Grootfontein Agricultural College, who have a serious chance of a medal in the blue chip sprint event of these Olympic Games.At which point, that cruelty. In June Masilingi and Christine Mboma were barred by World Athletics from running in the 400m, their chosen event at these Games. In Tokyo they have already faced questions about whether they should be running at all, and indeed (again, aged 18) whether they should be classing themselves as women at all.This stems from something both Masilingi and Christine Mboma
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The sight of a needle piercing skin is enough to chill a quarter of adult Britons and trigger up to 4% into fainting. But hope is on the horizon for needle-phobics as researchers are working on a range of non-injectable Covid vaccine formulations, including nasal sprays and tablets.Almost every vaccine in use today comes with a needle, and the approved Covid-19 vaccines are no exception. Once jabbed, the body’s immune system usually mounts a response, but scientists in the UK and beyond are hoping to harness the immune arsenal of the mucous membranes that line the nose, mouth, lungs and digestive tract, regions typically colonised by respiratory viruses including Covid-19, in part to allay the fears of needle-phobics.To understand the role this anxiety may be playing in vaccine hesitancy in the UK, Daniel Freeman, a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Oxford, and colleagues recruited more than 15,000 adults – representative of age, gender, ethnicity, income and region of the UK population – in a study and found that a quarter of the group screened positive for a potential injection phobia.Notably, this subset of people were twice as likely to report that they would put off getting vaccinated or indeed never get the jab. Out of the total number of those fearful of needles, 10% were found to be strongly Covid vaccine-hesitant.Probably about 3% to 4% of the UK’s total adult population were needle-phobic (have an intense fear of medical procedures involving injections), he said. And the fear of needles was more prevalent in younger adults, he added. “So, potentially, needle phobia explains more of the hesitancy in younger people.”“The fear of needles is the one type of anxiety where actually you can faint and that sort of fear and sometimes the embarrassment about fainting is a powerful driver that people want to avoid.”This avoidance, among other reasons, has spawned efforts to develop Covid-19 vaccines in the form of inhaled vapours, tablets, oral drops or intranasal sprays.Dr Stephen Griffin, a virologist at Leeds University, said he was constantly asked by UK healthcare staff when there would be non-injectable formulations of
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A police officer has been convicted of assaulting two black males within two days, including kicking a 15-year-old boy when he was on the ground.PC Declan Jones of West Midlands police denied the assaults but was convicted in a judgment delivered at Birmingham magistrates court on Monday.The court found that Jones, 30, assaulted one man in Aston, Birmingham on 20 April last year, and the next day kicked and punched a 15-year-old boy in Newtown whom he wrongly suspected of having drugs.The assaults came amid a police crackdown in the area, and the judge said the officer abused his power and may have been affected by “paranoia”.He was charged over three assaults alleged to have been committed over a four-day period in April in Birmingham weeks into the first lockdown.He was acquitted of one, where he punched the nose of an alleged gang member wearing a stab-proof vest, and was convicted of two others.District judge Shamim Qureshi said the attack on the child came despite his adopting a “surrender pose” after Jones and another officer stopped him, and bent his fingers back.The judge said: “The next stage of this incident is shown on camera when [the victim] stops and stands with his hands wide open in the surrender pose. PC Jones then punches him to the ground, orders him to roll over on to his stomach and then kicks him, in my view like taking a free kick in football.“PC Jones claimed that people have hidden weapons and even with their hands in the air or behind their head, they might reach for something.“When a police officer can be seen on a video to kick at a 15-year-old boy on the ground, people would lose faith in the police force.”In the other assault, Jones kneed and punched a man four times whom he wrongly thought had stolen a bicycle, which in fact was his. The judge said Jones had abused his power.Qureshi said of the officer: “I consider that PC Jones has a paranoia that everyone in a high-crime area has concealed weapons all over their body and I query whether he was suited to this type of work in those areas.“Being in a high-crime area is not a justification for anyone being stopped and searched.”The judge in his ruling said the o
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A decade ago on Aug. 1, Democratic Rep. Gabrielle Giffords returned to Congress seven months after a gunman shot her and killed six people during a “Congress on Your Corner” event in Tucson, Arizona. Giffords’ surprise appearance, to cast a vote in favor of raising the nation’s debt limit, was hailed as a unifying, bipartisan moment at the time.  Giffords, whose husband Mark Kelly now serves as a U.S. senator representing Arizona, would later resign from Congress and start an eponymous organization dedicated to combating gun violence. She recently spoke with HuffPost via email about how she now sees bipartisan moments like this as few and far between. This interview has been lightly edited for clarity. You returned to Congress a decade ago when many people thought you never woul
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Steve Baker, Conservative MP for Wycombe and a well-known Brexiter, said he was not surprised by new research showing that his constituency has the highest levels of food insecurity of anywhere in the country. Around 14% of residents reported going hungry in January and February this year, while a third said getting enough food was a struggle. Mr Baker has the benefit of local knowledge. It is less than a year since another report showed Buckinghamshire to have one of the worst records on social mobility in the UK. But for ministers, these new figures should be a wake-up call. Hunger is disturbing in and of itself. But there are particular reasons to worry about pockets of deep poverty in otherwise wealthy areas.Buckinghamshire’s highly selective education system is one factor contributi
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So now we know. Harry Kane really is prepared to do whatever it takes to force a move from Tottenham to Manchester City. The question had nagged away since the final week of last season when Kane and his camp had given the definitive signal that they wanted out and the battle lines were drawn, with Daniel Levy, the Spurs chairman, digging in and refusing to countenance the sale.Would Kane be prepared to activate the nuclear option and withdraw his cooperation at Spurs? Surely not, most people had hoped, because to do the dirty like this would be so unbecoming of a homegrown hero, of an England captain.And yet on Monday morning, Kane did the dirty, he did the bad thing, the last-resort play, when he refused to turn up for his first day of pre-season tests and checks. Now we knew.What a mess, and the first thing to say is that Kane has let himself down. There has been some understanding among Spurs fans about his desire to join a club that can challenge for the biggest prizes this season, even if none of them have wanted to picture the reality of him actually wearing the colours of a rival.They know how Spurs ended the previous season – without a permanent manager, with qualificati
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Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) wrote in a Sunday op-ed that schools should promote patriotism by teaching children a rosy version of U.S. history, leaving out the role of slavery and racism throughout. By doing this, he says schools will be making “an investment in love.” “Let’s make it together ― and now,” the Missouri Republican said of this “love” in a New York Post piece. “Let’s teach our children to know and love America.” Hawley, who is perhaps best known as the U.S. senator who raised his fist in solidarity before a mob of white supremacists and Donald Trump supporters attacked the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 to try to stop Joe Biden from being certified as president, wrote his op-ed as he promotes a bill he recently introduced to teach children a whitewashed version of American history. His bill, which is going nowhere, would bar federal money from going to public schools that teach students about the roles that white supremacy and racism played in the country’s founding. It would also require schools that get federal money to ensure that students can read and recite portions of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Pledge of Allegiance at certain grade levels. Hawley’s new op-ed gives specific examples of how to look at U.S. history through a purely positive lens. “This isn’t a ­nation of oppressors. This is a nation of liberators,” Hawley wrote of a history that includes white colonizers slaughtering Native Americans in the name of civilization and President Andrew Jackson forcibly removing 100,000 Native Americans from their ancestral homelands, resulting in 15,000 deaths from exposure, disease and starvation. “
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Alexander Lukashenko has largely squeezed the life out of the protest movement that threatened his despotic hold on power last summer. As he has done so, a vicious, totalitarian mood has come to dominate all corners of life in Belarus. Earlier this month, there was a sweeping crackdown on NGOs, many of which were previously judged non-political. Independent media organisations have been harassed and shut down. The essential illegitimacy of Mr Lukashenko’s regime was exposed in the aftermath of the stolen elections of 2020. Its survival is now ensured by the brutal crushing of dissent wherever it is found.Even at the Tokyo Olympics. The decision on Sunday by the Belarusian athlete Krystsina Tsimanouskaya to seek asylum in Poland followed what was ostensibly a sporting dispute. Ms Tsimanouskaya had publicly criticised the Belarus team’s coaches for failing to conduct the necessary doping tests ahead of the women’s 4x400m race. When she refused to be sent home in disgrace, a leaked tape revealed that a member of the Belarus delegation had told her: “Let this situation go. Otherwise the more that you struggle, it will be like a fly caught in a spider’s web: the more it spins, the more it gets entangled.” If the chilling menace contained in these words seems disproportionate, the tone probably comes from the top: the head of the Belarus National Olympic Committee is Mr Lukashenko’s son Viktor.Ms Tsimanouskaya is under police protection in Tokyo. Her husband, Arseniy
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Glenn Youngkin, the Republican candidate in Virginia’s looming gubernatorial election, twice refused to shut down GOP voters’ wild conspiracy theories about former President Donald Trump’s 2020 election loss at a campaign event last week, even balking at the chance to correct a voter who posited that Trump could be reinstated to the presidency as soon as this month. “I don’t know the particulars about how that can happen, because what’s happening in the court system is moving slowly and it’s unclear. And we all know the courts move slowly,” Youngkin said, in response to a ques
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He was peddling his black-and-white photos of New York City’s majesty for $5 each in the 1980s — until a famous photographer came upon them in “astonishment.”Credit...Park Slope GalleryAug. 2, 2021Updated 1:32 p.m. ETIn the 1980s, a street photographer named George Forss was selling his black-and-white pictures of the Empire State Building and Central Park to tourists for $5 a pop. Like so many of New York’s sidewalk peddlers, he was just trying to make a buck. But his images stood apart from the typical fare.As he saw it, New York was the Emerald City, and his cityscapes portrayed a
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I joked to another sex worker recently that five years ago every journalist asked us, maddeningly and repeatedly, about sex robots. Now, the obsession is OnlyFans.As a full-service sex worker (“full service” is the industry term for penis-in-vagina penetrative sex), the prominence of OnlyFans in media discourse is frustrating, but I understand it in the same way I understood that last preoccupation. Combine a moral panic (prostitution) with an older generation’s feeling of being left behind by technology (AI, the gig economy) and you have an intoxicating topic. Like sugar-baby website Se
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When Dr Elisabeth Bik raised serious concerns about the methodology of a paper that claimed hydroxychloroquine was effective in treating Covid-19, the online trolling was relentless.The trolls, mostly supporters of the controversial French professor Didier Raoult, who co-wrote the paper, “bombarded me on Twitter with all kinds of threats and false accusations”, says Bik, a microbiologist who grew up in the Netherlands and now lives in the United States.Bik’s home address was posted on Twitter, and other users tweeted photos of women behind bars at her, tagging the FBI. After Bik examined and critiqued further studies from Raoult’s laboratory, “Raoult and his lawyer even filed a legal complaint against me, which was very intimidating,” Bik says.Raoult’s colleague, Prof Eric Ch
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A man has been convicted of raping a 13-year-old girl 46 years ago, after the daughter conceived during the attack pursued charges against him.Carvel Bennett, 74, was convicted by a jury at Birmingham crown court. Members of the jury deliberated for just over two hours before finding him guilty.In what is thought to be the first case of its kind, Bennett was tracked down by Daisy, now 45, who was conceived through the rape. DNA tests on Daisy and her birth parents confirmed that Bennett was her biological father.Carvel Bennett is due to be sentenced on Tuesday.The jury heard evidence from Daisy’s birth mother, now 59, that she had been told by her mother that she was required to babysit Bennett’s children. Soon after arriving there, one of the children told her she was wanted upstairs
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Chrissy Teigen is back on Instagram chronicling her travels, following a return to social media after apologizing for her role in bullying a teenage Courtney Stodden about a decade ago.  Teigen told followers all about attending a UNICEF Summer gala in Capri, Italy, where her husband, John Legend, performed on Sunday. The model said it was “trippy” to attend the event, as it was her “first sober Italian getaway.”  “It was so so trippy being sober at something you typically would have been wasted at,” the 35-year-old said. “That paired with all the crazy hot young models and club dudes and seeing your young self over and over, oh man it was crazy.” “Anyhow I dunno. I’m rambling. we had so much fun,” the “Lip Sync Battle” host added. “I didn’t do anything
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Last summer, as one city after another broke out in protest against the murder of George Floyd, some of the most enduring images were not of the demonstrators, but of the police: decked out in riot gear, aiming automatic weapons at peaceful crowds, and riding around on armored vehicles built for war. The crackdowns on protesters renewed furious demands to end a suite of federal programs that have put billions of dollars’ worth of military weapons in the hands of local police. President Joe Biden singled out the most infamous of these — the Pentagon’s 1033 program, which transfers weapons and equipment from America’s foreign wars directly to domestic law enforcement agencies — for special condemnation. “Surplus military equipment for law enforcement? They don’t need that,”
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A tube strike that threatened to bring days of disruption to London this week has been suspended.The transport union RMT announced that it was calling off the industrial action it planned to start on Tuesday, to allow talks to continue with London Underground at the conciliation service Acas.The 11th-hour decision came after Transport for London had warned passengers of severe disruption to the transport system, with many lines closed from lunchtime. Strikes are still planned to run over four days from Tuesday 24 August, should continuing talks at Acas fail to reach a resolution.The dispute is over changes to London’s night tube service, which was reduced during the pandemic. The separate pool of designated night-time drivers is to be abolished, which the union said would cut part-time j
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In 1894, notorious poacher Ed Howell was caught in Yellowstone National Park slaughtering bison, which were on the brink of extinction. US Army soldiers patrolling the park brought him into custody, and the story led to the first US federal law protecting wildlife. The soldiers were thought of as heroes for stopping the killer. But in reality, it was the US Army that had been responsible for driving bison to near-extinction in the first place. In the mid-1800s, a cultural belief known as “manifest destiny” dictated that white settlers were the rightful owners of the entire North American continent — even though Native Americans had inhabited the land for centuries. In order to clear that land for white settlers, the US Army engaged in violent scorched-earth tactics against the In
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With one extraordinary act of strength and defiance, Emily Campbell ripped a 161kg barbell off the floor, rested it on her shoulders, and began to squat. With another she exploded upwards to thrust the weight - more than two beer kegs worth put together - high above her head.There was a little wobble of the knees. A steadying smile. Then a beep. And, just like that, Britain had its first ever female Olympic weightlifting medallist - and surely its most powerful, heartwarming and potentially life-changing story of these Games.Team GB will never say it. But some medals are simply more inspirational than others. And watching Campbell, a big, strong and proud black woman from a deprived community win an over-87kg super-heavyweight silver medal was a real This Girl Can moment.Five years ago Cam
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Canada’s federal government has reached a C$8bn settlement in two class-action lawsuits with First Nations communities over access to clean drinking water.The agreement promises to compensate residents, ensure drinking water infrastructure is built and modernize legislation – as First Nations leaders have been demanding for decades.“Our commitment is to ensure that all First Nations communities have access to clean, safe and reliable drinking water,” said Marc Miller, Indigenous services minister, at a press conference late on Friday.Canada is one of the most water-rich nations in the world, yet in 32 communities across the country, the government has issued 51 advisories against drinking water tainted by industrial contaminants, bacteria or parasites. The federal government has el
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Mondo Duplantis has a world record and a good chance at Olympic gold. But he’s endeared himself to Sweden (his mother’s home country) by buying into its culture.Credit...Ben Stansall/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesAug. 2, 2021, 12:47 p.m. ETTOKYO — Mondo Duplantis was a high school freshman when his life changed.A pole-vaulting prodigy from Lafayette, La., Duplantis was a couple of months from his first international competition, the 2015 world youth championships, when he received a recruiting call from a coach. The twist was that the coach was from the Swedish Athletics Association.“He would call me and my parents every day going, ‘You should compete for Sweden, we’re super well-organized, we’re going to take care of your poles, we’re going to do everything for you,
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Emma Brockes makes a good case against using shame and ridicule against the vaccine-hesitant (Should we shame the anti-vaxxers? That can only backfire, 31 July). However, she leaves to the very last sentence the most important consideration: “Why does he think that?” Surely the key to persuading the hesitant is to separate the various categories of concern/attitude and address these issues directly and explicitly – something which neither governments nor the media have attempted to do.Allowing target groups to remain an amorphous body of “the unvaccinated” helps to sow resentment among those with understandable concerns, through their being lumped together with baseless conspiracists. Inveterate libertarians, meanwhile, gain spurious legitimacy by their association with those cla
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With reference to Lucy Ellmann’s starkly eloquent letter (We should blame men for the climate crisis, 29 July), I have spent 30 years teaching secondary geography pupils that we don’t use the term “manmade” any more – it’s gender-biased. We should use “anthropogenic” instead. It also makes you sound cleverer.I’m not sure that I’ve been doing the right thing. The climate emergency is indeed a very gendered fact of 21st-century life. The primary drivers of it have been male-led and male-dominated entities, and the primary victims will be poor, brown and female.It may be time to approve of the term “manmade” once more – with qualifiers.Simon WoolleyBlashford, Hampshire While I agree with Lucy Ellman that all the world’s problems might well have been created by men,
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In Disney’s Jungle Cruise, the actor plays a typical hero—and ignores the qualities that make him so magnetic on-screen.Disney+Once upon a time, a broad-shouldered actor who started out in the brawny sporting world made a successful leap to Hollywood—first playing villains and quirky supporting roles, then becoming a star who could headline hyper-violent R-rated thrillers as easily as family comedies. Eventually, he parlayed this superstardom into political office. I’m talking, of course, about Arnold Schwarzenegger: weightlifting champ, king of action cinema in the ’80s and ’90s, and eventual governor of California. But this career arc seems to be a model for a newer Hollywood A-lister, the square-jawed and larger-than-life Dwayne Johnson, a onetime professional wrestler, curr
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Palestinian residents of the occupied East Jerusalem neighbourhood of Sheikh Jarrah facing forcible eviction from their homes have been offered a compromise deal with Jewish settlers by Israel’s supreme court, in an unexpected development in the high-profile case.The session on Monday, which was supposed to reach a final decision on whether to accept an appeal from four Palestinian families over eviction orders in the decades-old legal battle, was instead met with a surprise entreaty from the judges for the two sides to accept a “practical solution”.“What we are saying is, let’s move from the level of principles to the levels of practicality,” Justice Isaac Amit told the courtroom, where proceedings took place in Hebrew without translation into Arabic. “People must continue to live there and that’s the idea, to try to reach a practical arrangement.”The proposed compromise would allow the 70 Palestinians to remain in their homes as tenants with “protected status” and safeguard them from eviction for “the coming years” while paying an annual fee of 1,500NIS (£335) to the Nahalat Shimon company, a settler organisation that lower courts have declared the rightful owners of the disputed properties.Israeli leftwing activists protest against government policy regarding Palestinians in East Jerusalem outside the supreme court in Jerusalem on Monday. Photograph: Abir Sultan/EPAThe deal, which leaves the question of legal ownership unanswered, was not greeted with enthusiasm by either side, but both parties are expected to give a formal response in the next court session.The trade-off is likely to prove unacceptable to the Palestinians, as it would in eff
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One of the original Rockford Peaches is joining the lineup of Amazon Studios’ “A League of Their Own” reboot series.  Appearing on the “Everything Iconic with Danny Pellegrino” podcast last week, Rosie O’Donnell confirmed plans to appear on the show in a guest role.  “I’m playing a bartender in one of the scenes at the local gay bar,” she explained. “I’m shooting it in the upcoming months.”  O’Donnell made her feature film debut in the original “A League of Their Own,” which was released in 1992 and is regarded as a modern classic. The comedy chronicled the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, which was founded in 1943, and starred Geena Davis, Tom Hanks and Madonna.  The series reboot will be co-created by Abbi Jacobson of “Broad City” and is billed as “a reinterpretation” of the original film that “takes a deeper look at race and sexuality,” according to Entertainment Weekly. In addition to Jacobson, the confirmed cast includes Chanté Adams, D’Arcy Carden, Gbemisola Ikumelo and Nick Offerman.  An Amazon representative did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for comment on O’Donnell’s involvement in the new series.  O’Donnell has frequently credited the original “A League of Their Own” with catapulting her to Hollywood fame after years on the standup comedy circuit, as well as fostering her friendship with Madonna. She reiterated that point in her chat with Pellegrino, noting she couldn’t be happier with what she’s seen of the reboot thus far.   “I love the ‘Broad City’ women,” she said. “When I was told [Jacobson] was doing ‘League,’ she called me up
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One down, two to go. Sifan Hassan won the first leg of her Tokyo triple by taking the gold medal in the women’s 5,000m. And, being Hassan, she did it style, with a finishing kick that swept her from past four of the finest long‑distance runners in the world.Her final time of 14min 36.79sec did not break any records, but that last lap did. No woman had run a quicker final 400m in this event in the Olympics, no woman had, in fact, come close to doing anything like it. It was unprecedented, like so much else Hassan is doing this week. “Many people say I’m crazy,” she said. “Believe me, I think I’m crazy too.”Next up, Hassan has the semi‑finals of the 1500m on Wednesday, the final of that same event on Friday, and then the 10,000m on Saturday. If she can do it, it would be one of the greatest feats in Olympic history.And it almost ended before it had even really started. Earlier in the day, Hassan fell on the last lap of her 1500m heat but jumped back to her feet and sprinted back past the field, in what has already become one of the iconic races of these Games. She could have stayed down and lodged a protest, other runners did, and were allowed to run again in a later heat. “Believe me, I thought about it,” Hassan said. “But I told myself: ‘No I don’t want to regret it, I don’t want any excuses, I don’t want people to say that I only recovered because I stopped running.’” It was a wild bit of thinking, but it worked out. The fall, and the recovery, took so much out of Hassan that she convinced herself she had no chance of winning the 5,000m.“Sometimes bad things do good,” Hassan said, “because really there is a lot of pressure on me running these three distances, running in the morning, running in the evening, I never do that, even in training, and the 5,000m was a really strong field. After I fell down I was so tired, and had pain everywhere and I thought: ‘Well I don’t really have a chance to win this now, I’m just going to finish the race and see what I can do.’” Hassan was still thinking like that during the race. “I was talking to myself, saying: ‘I can’t, I can’t. I can’t,’ like some crazy person
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The photographer Rankin has designed the covers for a forthcoming edition of Philip Pullman’s fantasy trilogy His Dark Materials.Rankin, who has photographed everyone from the Queen to David Bowie, created eye-catching images for each of the three books, which tell the story of Lyra, an intrepid young girl who encounters otherworldly characters in parallel universes.Rankin said he was excited by the project because he was able to bring out the darkness of the stories with the surreal images, which were published for the first time in the Guardian on Monday.He has cast models as characters of Pullman’s imagination, photographing them alongside their “dæmons”, animal manifestations of a person’s soul.Rankin’s cover for The Subtle Knife. Photograph: © RANKIN, 2021Portraying Marisa Coulter, who has “tortured and killed without regret”, Rankin juxtaposed her with her golden monkey dæmon so that their eyes appear almost superimposed.He said: “I wanted to create this amalgamation of the dæmon and the person. It’s really trying to embody the darkness of the series.”The photographer said book covers should be more dramatic: “With classics, there’s a lot of playing safe … because one aesthetic or another might not be liked … What’s great about His Dark M
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Too many women do not receive support for anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after a miscarriage, according to campaigners, who are calling on the government to completely overhaul medical services to better accommodate those who have experienced pregnancy loss.The charity Tommy’s said that despite one in four pregnancies ending in miscarriage, it remains poorly understood due to the absence of NHS data collection. Support on the NHS is also restricted to those who have experienced three consecutive miscarriages, despite the fact that many women experience lifelong physical and psychological consequences.“We’re trying to bust the myths around miscarriage,” said Tommy’s chief executive, Jane Brewin. “One of these is that it’s a short-term thing rather than a long-term serious condition that doesn’t have an enduring impact on people.“There are people who are psychologically really unwell who receive no interventions other than going to their GP, who won’t be able to refer them for support unless they’ve had three in a row. This really isn’t adequate.”Tommy’s is urging the government to prominently feature investment in miscarriage prevention and treatment, as well as mental health support, in its women’s health strategy, which will be published later this year. Its research has estimated that miscarriages cost the NHS £430m annually, before factoring in broader costs to the economy, such as time off work.Research by the charity showed that 20% of women who have had a miscarriage will go on to experience clinical PTSD, 16%-18% will suffer from anxiety and depression, and the risk of suicide is quadrupled.These symptoms may continue even when women have a subsequent healthy pregnancy, which some term a “rainbow baby” to reflect a positive outcome after a stormy experience. However, women and their partners report struggling to feel joyful about their new pregnancy, and worrying constantly that they will have another miscarriage.The issue has gained public attention recently after media coverage of Carrie Johnson’s pregnancy, in which she was reported as saying she was hoping for a “rainbow baby”. In a private I
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A killer whale stranded on a rocky shore in Alaska was saved in an hours-long rescue effort by boaters, locals and wildlife officials.The 20-ft (6 metres) orca was spotted washed up on Prince of Wales island last Thursday, apparently stuck in a crevice of rocks 4ft above the tide line.Boaters who first saw the stranded whale alerted the US coastguard and came ashore to keep it cool with seawater and to scare away sea birds hovering for a feast.Images posted to social media show good samaritans pouring buckets of water onto the orca to keep it hydrated.Eventually officials from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration (NOAA) arrived to relieve the volunteers. By about 2pm, almost six hours after the whale was first spotted, the tide had risen sufficiently to allow it to refloat itself and return to the ocean.“It moved a bit slowly at first, and meandered around a little before swimming away,” NOAA spokesperson Julie Fair said in a statement.The agency said it was awaiting confirmation that the orca, which officials say is a juvenile from the west coast’s transient population of Bigg’s killer whales, and named T146D for classification and tracking purposes, had rejoined its pod.At least five other killer whales from the waters around Prince of Wales island had stranded over the last 20 years, and all survived, according to researcher Jared Towers of Canada’s department of fisheries and oceans, which monitors whale movements.“They’ve all rejoined their families after stranding, and they’ve all gone on to survive and live normal, healthy lives,” he told Alaska Public Media.“There’s a good chance it’s met up with them now, and it’s just carrying on a normal life after spending some time out of the water. I don’t think anyone knows exactly when this whale stranded, or what the circumstances were, but I would make a wager that there was harbor seal hunting as the motivating factor.”Whales are known to chase seals and sea lions towards the shore and can become stranded in shallow waters.Chance Strickland, a boat captain who anchored to allow his crew to come ashore and help the whale, told the New York Times he could hear it cryi
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Boris Johnson has hinted that plans for tougher travel restrictions on popular holiday destinations could be ditched, as he said he wanted a simple approach to quarantining on return from abroad.The prime minister has been under pressure from cabinet ministers and the travel industry to simplify the rules, after it was rumoured that a new category of “amber watchlist” could be created in England to warn travellers that a destination was on the brink of being put on the “red list”.Fears that popular destinations such as Spain, Greece and Italy could be put into the new “amber watchlis
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Five years ago a forest fire in the hills above Rio de Janeiro spread ash across the pitch before Team GB and Spain met at the same stage of the 2016 Games. The only thing on fire at Oi Hockey Stadium on a sultry Tokyo evening was the goalkeeping of Britain’s Maddie Hinch, whose extraordinary shutout in the shootout propelled the reigning women’s Olympic champions into a semi-final against the Netherlands.Twice in normal time Britain went ahead, through Hannah Martin and Grace Balsdon, and twice they allowed Spain back into the match. But when the hooter sounded on a 2-2 draw you could alm
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Turkey has launched an international appeal for help in taming fires raging across the country that have killed eight people in recent days, as what has been described as one of the worst heatwaves in decades intensifies in south-east Europe.Following criticism of the Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, after it emerged that Turkey has no firefighting planes, authorities in Istanbul were promised water-dropping planes from the European Union. The country is battling deadly wildfires along its coastline for a sixth day.00:26Aerial footage of Pescara wildfire as residents and tourists evacuated – videoNearly 95,000 hectares have been devastated by the flames so far this year, compared with an average of 13,516 at the same point in the years from 2008 to 2020. Turkey’s defence ministry released satellite images showing the extent of the damage, with forest areas turned black and smoke still visible.Wildfires have also broken out across much of southern Europe, including Greece, Spain and Italy, with temperatures rising above 40C (104F), forcing hundreds to evacuate.Temperatures reached 45C (113 F) in Greece, which is using old power stations to cope with demand for air conditioning. Workers with health conditions have also been allowed to take time off work.A major blaze broke out early on Saturday near Patras in western Greece and five villages have been evacuated. Eight people in the region were hospitalised with burns and respiratory problems.Cyprus, recovering from a major wildfire last month, has kept water-dropping planes on patrol to respond to fires as they break out. “If you don’t react right away with a massive response to any outbreak, things can turn difficult quickly,” forestry service chief Charalambos Alexandrou told state-run media.At least five people have been wounded, 30 more treated for light smoke inhalation, and holidaymakers evacuated after wildfires devastated a pine wood near a beach in Pescara, Italy. The country has recorded more than 800 wildfires, according to authorities, the majority in Sicily, with hundreds of tourists and inhabitants evacuated from their homes after a series of wildfires broke out in Palermo and Catania.“We have had difficult years in our history in the fight against wildfires, but this year is likely to be the worst,” said Fabrizio Curcio, head of Italy’s civil protection. “About 33% of
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In Northern Ireland, many still revere the automotive magnate John DeLorean as a local hero for situating his car factory in Belfast at the height of the Troubles, a time of extreme economic deprivation during which the influx of jobs came as a godsend. Others – his family, his personal confidantes, his colleagues, the FBI officials responsible for his eventual arrest – remember the business tycoon as a greedy, flagrantly unethical megalomaniac. The new miniseries Myth & Mogul: John DeLorean triangulates the truth in hiding somewhere between these two characterizations.Conceived as a feature for the BBC, now expanded and split into three parts for streaming on Netflix, the biographical documentary takes stock of a man ensconced in ambiguity. (Those giddy about Back to the Future nostalgia, look elsewhere – a brief, obligatory name-check at the top of the first episode gets that out of the way with bigger fish to fry.) When he left a cushy position at General Motors to invent the car of the future, was he a free thinker chasing a noble dream, or a deluded narcissist obsessed with putting his name on a company? When he brought the nascent DeLorean Motor Company (DMC) to neighborhood of Dunmurry, was he expressing solidarity with a controversial cause, or simply capitalizing on a period of turbulent political instability? When he agreed to transport millions of dollars in cocaine for what turned out to be undercover agents, was he revealing himself to be a crook or falling victim to an unjust setup verging on entrapment?Those were the major questions tackled by the pioneering non-fiction film-maker Chris Hegedus and her late partner, DA Pennebaker, when they set out to
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A British human rights campaigner and lawyer who was fighting to free Dubai’s Princess Latifa had his mobile phone compromised by Pegasus spyware on 3 and 4 August 2020, according to a forensic analysis carried out by Amnesty International.David Haigh is the first confirmed British victim of infiltration by Pegasus software, an attack suspected to have been ordered by Dubai, because of his connection with the 35-year-old princess, a daughter of the emirate’s ruler, Sheikh Mohammed, and the Free Latifa campaign of which he was part.At the time his phone was compromised, Haigh had been helping the legal team of Princess Haya, a wife of the sheikh, who is embroiled in a battle with the ruler of Dubai in the English courts over the custody of their young children.Haya’s own legal team were arguing, in part, that Sheikh Mohammed’s treatment of Latifa meant that he should not be allowed to take control of the children. The case in the family courts is continuing.Haigh, 43, said he was “horrified” by the idea his phone had been targeted, which he said came a few days after a year and a half of secret smartphone contact with Latifa, then held under house arrest in Dubai, had been suddenly lost.The phone, Haigh said, contained dozens of messages and videos from Latifa, who had obtained a phone and made recordings from her bathroom, the only room where she could lock the door.Some of the films, which described her plight, were later released by the Free Latifa campaign to B
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Today in a nutshell: A very wet Olympic stadium watched Sifan Hassan claim the first of the three golds she wants, Team GB took gold in the team eventing, and the USWNT crashed out of the football at the semi-final stage.Tomorrow’s key moments: Sport climbing makes it debut, the women run their 800m and 200m finals, and Simone Biles looks set to return to competition, in the balance beam final.Miltiadis Tentoglou in the long jump. Photograph: Yohei Osada/Aflo/ShutterstockIn Monday’s morning athletics session, Miltiadis Tentoglou of Greece won the men’s long jump after tying with Juan Miguel Echevarría on 8.41m. His second furthest jump, further than the Cuban’s, then proved decisive so there was no repeat of the previous days dual golds in the high jump.Jasmine Camacho-Quinn won the women’s 100 metres hurdles gold – only Puerto Rico’s second ever gold. Camacho-Quinn burst into tears afterwards, saying: “For such a small country it gives little people hope. I am just glad I am the person to do that. I am really happy right now. Anything is possible.”Jasmine Camacho-Quinn reacts after winning the gold medal in the women’s 100m hurdles final. Photograph: Matthias Hangst/Getty ImagesSifan Hassan of the Netherlands produced a miraculous recovery to keep her audacious Olympic treble alive after a heavy fall left her 25 metres adrift of her rivals on the final lap of the women’s 1500m heats. She fell in a tangle of legs with 380m to go … and then went on to win the heat. A few hours later, she went on to win the 5,000m at ease. Kenya’s Hellen Obiri and Ethiopian Gudaf Tsegay took silver and bronze respectively.Sifan Hassan of the Netherlands falls on the final lap of her 1500m heat – she regained her feet well off the pace but recovered to win the race. Photograph: BSR Agency/Getty ImagesSoufiane El Bakkali of Morocco won gold in the men’s 3,000m steeplechase. Lamecha Girma of Ethiopia claimed silver and Benjamin Kigen of Kenya took the bronze. Torrential rain disrupted many events in the stadium, but eventually the delayed women’s discus finished with a gold for Valarie Allman of the US.There was an 11th gold medal of the Games for Team GB in the equestrian eventing, as Oliver Townend, Laura Collett and Tom McEwen won the team event for Britain for the first time since 1972. Sixty-two-year-old Andrew Hoy led the Australian team to silver, with defending champions France in third. McEwen then added individual silver as Hoy took bronze, his sixth Olympic medal. He’s now Australia’s oldest ever Olympic medallist. The individual event was won by Germany’s Julia Krajewski.Li Wenwen set an Olympic record in winning the +87kg weightlifting for China, as Emily Campbell won Britain’s first weightlifting medal since 1984 with silver. Laurel Hubbard’s historic appearance saw her fail to register a lift.Emily Campbell in the women’s +87kg weightlifting. Photograph: Martin Rickett/PAIn the track cycling, Germany’s women smashed the world record in the qualifying round of the women’s team pursuit. Their time was almost three seconds faster than the record set by Britain when they won gold in Rio five years ago. Te
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In her mid-20s, while working as a hostess in a Tokyo nightclub, the author Mo Hayder, who has died aged 59, saw the lives of three strangers snuffed out in quick succession. A heart attack in a coffee bar; a workman falling to his death; a snakebite.These close-up brushes with mortality, shortly after the murder of one friend and the brutal rape of another, sparked a fascination with death and with violence against women that would last a lifetime. Later, while working as a film-maker, Mo produced an animated short in which a cute Claymation couple went to bed together before the woman pulled the man’s head off, ate it and lobbed the skull out of the window. The film won an award, but the local TV station refused to show it, on the grounds that they did not agree with cannibalism.It was a sign of things to come.Mo was born Beatrice Clare Bastin (a surname later changed by deed poll to Dunkel), the daughter of John Bastin, an astrophysicist, and Susan Hollins, a teacher. She grew up in Essex and the US, and left school at 15. A rebellious streak resulted in an early arrest for fighting – of which she was inordinately proud – and a self-confessed “wild child” phase. Following the failure of a brief marriage and after working as a barmaid, a security guard and making films in the US, she exploded on to the crime fiction scene with her first novel, Birdman, in 2000.She later claimed that the novel had been written to exorcise her dark obsessions, but it only clarified what she called a “compulsive need to wriggle my toes in life’s gutters”. The graphic descriptions of violence and its aftermath were not to everyone’s taste, especially those who preferred their fictional murders to happen off-stage and their sleuth to be the sort who gathered suspects together in a drawing room, but the novel was an instant bestseller and earned Mo and her troubled detective Jack Caffery legions of fans.Writers of “popular” fiction, especially those selling millions of copies, are normally expected to deliver a book a year, but Mo rarely did what people, or publishers, expected. After her hugely disturbing second novel, The Treatment (2001), Mo took three years to deliver what many, myself included, consider her masterpiece. Tokyo – since retitled The Devil of Nanking – uses the infamous Nanjing massacre of 1937 as a starting point for an all-too modern thriller and, while being a book that, arguably, confronts and addresses the author’s own past, is also the one that most clearly demonstrates her almost Jacobean fixation with “the skull beneath the skin”; with death as the ever-present shadow-sibling of life. It is a novel that, once read, is simply impossible to forget.Mo Hayder at the launch of the German edition of her 2004 novel Tokyo, which many consider her masterpiece. Photograph: Karl Schoendorfer/Rex/ShutterstockMo also refused to play the game when it came to the personal appearances and book festival dog-and-pony shows that have become part and parcel of a writer’s life. She had done what was expected early on, including a public launch, shortly before her debut was released, when her indomitable agent Jane Gregory in
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Joe Root wants Ben Stokes to take as much time out from England duty as he needs after revealing how tough it was to see his friend struggling the last time they spoke.Stokes has taken an indefinite break from cricket “to prioritise his mental wellbeing” and continue his rehabilitation from a finger injury in what represents a setback to England’s chances in the five-Test series against India that starts on Wednesday.Those close to the situation are not currently expecting Stokes to return this summer and it is clear Root, who has known the all-rounder since their days playing under-13s cricket against each other for Yorkshire and Cumbria, will not force the issue.“From my point of v
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Too facile? Too prolific? Too tasteful? Whatever the objections to Camille Saint-Saëns’s music, the French composer is shamefully neglected and overlooked. This year marks the centenary of his death, and is a good moment to plead the case for someone who, while he may not be quite in the Premier League of composers, is certainly top of the Championship and may well be worthy of promotion. Brentford, if not quite Beethoven.This summer’s Proms are giving him what might be called a modest push, programming his great Organ Symphony, the much-loved Carnival of the Animals, his first cello concerto, his engagingly sunny late oboe sonata (composed in the year of his death) and the Fantaisie in
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The Covid-19 pandemic was the perfect disaster for our cultural moment, because it made other people being wrong on the internet a matter of life and death.My use of the past tense here is aspirational. The emergence of the more contagious Delta variant threatens to undo a lot of progress – particularly here in the US, where active cases of coronavirus infection are up 149% from two weeks ago. Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that fully vaccinated people return to wearing masks indoors in public spaces. The hope that this summer would mark our return to normal is curdling fast, and the enlightened majority – the fact-based, Facebook-sceptical, and ful
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Every Summer Olympics, gymnasts amaze viewers by performing incredibly complex and dangerous skills. As these routines get more and more complicated, they become harder to top. The latest way to add value and distinguish a routine is a tricky skill called the wolf turn. The wolf turn has been around for decades, but recently it’s become a favorite in balance beam and floor routines. A gymnast will get into a squat position with one leg stretched out. She’ll then stretch out her arms and wind them up. Once she finds her balance, she’ll start spinning. Finally, she’ll stop and return to her original stance. Seems pretty simple, but the movement relies on a delicate balance of mass
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When Kitty Hart-Moxon, 97, was recently asked to choose one object that symbolised the horrors she survived at the hands of the Nazis in Auschwitz, Belsen, and on death marches, she had no doubts.A glass container encasing the preserved tattooed numbers she had cut out of her own arm and also that of her mother, Rosa Lola, which she keeps in a cupboard at her home in Harpenden, Hertfordshire, is a shocking, tangible reminder.“My number was 39934 with a little triangle at the bottom, and my mother’s was 39933”, she said.In postwar Britain, while training as a nurse and then qualifying as a radiographer, she was acutely conscious of people staring at the number, clearly visible in her sh
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A 100-year-old former concentration camp guard will stand trial in Germany in October accused of complicity in 3,518 murders, public prosecutors have announced.The prosecutor’s office in Neuruppin, which first brought the charges in February, received a medical assessment that confirmed the man was “fit to stand trial” despite his advanced age.Hearings will be limited to two and a half hours a day, according to prosecutors.The suspect is accused of “knowingly and willingly” assisting in the murder of prisoners at the Sachsenhausen camp in Oranienburg, north of Berlin, between 1942 and 1945.He is accused notably of complicity in the “execution by firing squad of Soviet prisoners o
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