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Credit...Associated PressWill Smith and the director Antoine Fuqua said on Monday that they were pulling their upcoming film production “Emancipation” out of Georgia because of the state’s new voting law, which has been denounced by activists as an effort to make voting harder for the state’s Black population.The slavery-era drama, which is being produced and financed by Apple Studios, is the first major production to cite the law as a reason to leave the state, which offers generous tax incentives to Hollywood productions and has become a major hub for Marvel Studios, Netflix and other industry heavyweights.“At this moment in time, the nation is coming to terms with its history and is attempting to eliminate vestiges of institutional racism to achieve true racial justice,” Mr. Smith and Mr. Fuqua said in a joint statement. “We cannot in good conscience provide economic support to a government that enacts regressive voting laws that are designed to restrict voter access. The new Georgia voting laws are reminiscent of voting impediments that were passed at the end of Reconstruction to prevent many Americans from voting. Regrettably, we feel compelled to move our film production work from Georgia to another state.”In the film, set to begin production this summer, Mr. Smith was set to play the real-life enslaved man named Peter, who emancipated himself from a Southern plantation and joined the Union Army. His story became famous after photographs of his back, scarred by whippings, appeared in the pages of Harper’s Weekly.Whether or not this move will prompt other studios to reconsider productions in Georgia is not clear. Stacey Abrams, along with Tyler Perry, who owns his own studio in Atlanta, and others have urged Hollywood not to uproot productions despite outrage over the new law.Credit...Neil Hall/EPA, via ShutterstockAn update to the contact tracing app used in England and Wales has been blocked from release by Apple and Google because of privacy concerns, renewing a feud between the British government and the two tech giants about how smartphones can be used to track Covid-19 cases.In an attempt to trace possible infections, the update to the app would have allowed a person who tests positive for the virus to upload a list of restaurants, shops and other venues they recently visited, data that would be used by health officials for contact tracing. But collecting such location information violates the terms of service that Google and Apple forced governments to agree to in exchange for making contact tracing apps available on their app stores.The dispute, first reported by the BBC, highlights the supernational role that Apple and Google have played responding to the virus. The companies, which control the software of nearly every smartphone in the world, have forced governments to design contact tracing apps to their privacy specifications, or risk not having the tracking apps made available to the public. The gatekeeper role has frustrated policymakers in Britain, France and elsewhere, who have argued those public health decisions are for governments, not private companies to make.The release of the app update was to coi
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The Monday shops opened and brought some relief to lockdown Britain was far from a happy one for the Happy Mondays star Bez, whose venture into horse racing got off to the worst possible start when Mystic Moonshadow, the horse bought to earn money for a charity refused to race at Redcar.Bez, real name Mark Berry, dancer and maracas-shaker for the Happy Mondays, launched his racing club last month with the aim of raising money for Manchester-based homeless charity Coffe 4 Craig but their flagship filly let them down on her very first trip to the races.“It looks like she was being a bit of a d
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Officials from Brooklyn Center said that the fatal shooting was an “accidental discharge,” and released body-camera video of the encounter.Credit...Joshua Rashaad McFadden for The New York TimesApril 12, 2021, 1:39 p.m. ETBROOKLYN CENTER, Minn. — The police officer who killed a man in a Minneapolis suburb on Sunday did so accidentally, officials said Monday, releasing a graphic body-camera video that appeared to depict the officer shouting, “Taser!” before firing her gun.“It is my belief that the officer had the intention to deploy their Taser, but instead shot Mr. Wright with a si
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One night in January, I was at a low ebb in a period of particularly low ebbs, when a friend messaged to say she’d booked a caravan in Croyde for the last week of the Easter school holidays. She and her husband had crunched the data on vaccine distribution and the likely effects of lockdown on hospital admissions, and felt it was worth taking a chance.I was less optimistic, but Parkdean Resorts, which operates Ruda Holiday Park in north Devon, has a Covid policy that meant we could shift the trip to another time of year if things hadn’t opened up by then – though you do have to pay the difference in price for your stay. I transferred the deposit for our family of four, thinking October half-term seemed more realistic.Amazingly, my friends got it spot on. So, here we are sitting in camping chairs above one of the most picturesque beaches in the country on the first day that self-contained holidays are permitted in England, bathing in beautiful Devonian light, despite having driven through grey skies and snow to get here, while our kids are charging about in a field. Feeling fortunate doesn’t cover it. We owe these friends, who are also here,in a separate caravan, an outdoor socially-distanced drink.The holiday park is full of smiling faces, the sense of a collective breath having been long drawn and now released.Liz Bolger, a teacher from Dorset has just arrived with her family, including her nine- and 12-year-old children.The writer and her kids on the caravan park“We all found this third lockdown much harder,” she says, while both kids nod vigorously. “The fact we weren’t expecting it, and then the weather in January and February being so bad. We felt a lot more trapped within our same four walls.”“To be here now with all this space and the sun glinting off the water feels liberating, especially on the date that things are opening up. It’s serendipitous but it makes it special, as if we’re celebrating things getting better.”The elation isn’t contained to guests.“Holiday parks can be quite eerie places when they’re closed,” Rob Warner, operations director of Parkdean Resorts South told me last week. “About 90% of our staff are locals, they’re attracted to the job as they like working in a vibrant environment with guests bobbing about everywhere. I’ve visited 42 holiday parks in the last three weeks and there’s excite
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The brothers paid homage to the Duke of Edinburgh’s service to the nation and to the Queen, but also shared personal memories of their grandfather.Credit...Alastair Grant/Associated PressApril 12, 2021, 1:31 p.m. ETPrince William and Prince Harry joined other members of the royal family in releasing statements honoring their grandfather, Prince Philip, who died at Windsor Castle three days ago, as a man of service and a fun and loving relative.The princes paid tribute on Monday to the Duke of Edinburgh’s devotion to his wife, Queen Elizabeth II, but also nodded to their private memories of a grandfather they described warmly as sharp-witted, mischievous and affectionate to their children.“My grandfather’s century of life was defined by service — to his country and Commonwealth, to his wife and Queen, and to our family,” William said in his statement. “I feel lucky to have not just had his example to guide me, but his enduring presence well into my own adult life — both through good times and the hardest days.”“I will never take for granted the special memories my children will always have of their great-grandpa coming to collect them in his carriage and seeing for themselves his infectious sense of adventure as well as his mischievous sense of humor!” William said in his statement, adding that he would continue support the Queen in the years ahead.“I will miss my Grandpa, but I know he would want us to get on with the job,” he said.In a separate statement, Harry described his grandfather as a “man of service, honor and great humor” who had a “seriously sharp wit” and “could hold the attention of any room due to his charm — and also because you never knew what he might say next.”“He will be remembered as the longest reining consort to the Monarch, a decorated serviceman, a Prince and a Duke,” Harry said in his statement. “But to me, like many of you who have lost a loved one or grandparent over the pain of this past year, he was my grandpa: master of the barbecue, legend of banter, and cheeky right ’til the end.”Harry said his grandfather would be sorely missed and thanked him for his service, his dedication to “Granny” and for always being himself.He signed off his statement, “Per Mare, Per Terram” a Latin phrase meaning “by sea, by land” and the motto of the Royal Marines, hinting at he and his grandfather’s shared connection as they had both held the force’s ceremonial position of Captain General.While Harry, William and their grandfather have been photographed innumerable times together at various events, the moment between them that has stuck most in the public’s mind is that of Philip walking with the young princes behind the coffin in the funeral procession for Princess Diana.ImageCredit...Pool photo by Jeff J. MitchellRoyal watchers are hoping that Philip’s funeral will go some way toward mending a monthslong rift that has emerged between the two brothers that Harry most recently talked about in an interview with Oprah Winfrey last month.Harry, who has been living in California with his wife, Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, since spring last year, has returned to Brit
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The toll on the UK’s mental health caused by the pandemic is becoming much clearer. The dismaying, if unsurprising, news as shops and businesses reopen is that fears that Covid would result in higher levels of mental illness have been borne out. What is particularly disturbing about the warning issued by the Royal College of Psychiatrists on Friday is that it most strongly applies to children. There were 80,226 more under-18s referred to NHS mental health services in England between April and December last year than in the same period in 2019. The number of children and young people needing emergency care rose 20% to 18,269, while the number of adults needing emergency treatment reached a record high of 159,347.Parity of esteem for mental health was supposedly enshrined in law in the 2012 Health and Social Care Act. But the promise was not fulfilled. Five years later, Theresa May named the lack of support for people with mental illnesses as one of the “burning injustices” that she hoped her premiership would address. But the prospect of measures such as legal limits on waiting times for talking therapies, which have long been in place for A&E and other hospital treatments, appears more remote than ever. Instead, research consistently points to the enormous difficulty of accessing services. Anne Longfield, the former children’s commissioner for England, published analysis showing that more than a third of those referred to child and adolescent mental health services received no treatment; another third waited more than a year.Pandemic conditions are likely to make it even harder to raise mental healthcare from its Cinderella status. The NHS’s focus is, more than ever, on hospitals, inpatients, vaccinations and intensive care – along with the people who work in these areas. Complex issues surrounding the estimated 1.1 million people who are ill with long Covid also require attention. Then there is the backlog of operations that has built up, while resources have been redirected towards Covid.Adrian James, president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, describes the situation as “terrifying”. The fact that large numbers of frontline NHS workers are also experiencing anxiety and depression only adds to the severity of the crisis. But while the scale of the challenge might appear overwhelming, confronting it head-on is the only sensible option. It is true that millions of people are coping with difficult circumstances, including bereavement. Emotions of loneliness, anger and sadness are not symptoms. But it isn’t good enough for ministers, or anyone else, to talk up resilience while ignoring evidence that hundreds of thousands of people are in need of professional help. As well as being wrong, this only stores up trouble for the future.New resources and, crucially, staff are obviously needed. Plans for the NHS workforce must include the recruitment of mental health nurses, doctors and psychotherapists. But ministers also need to show more emotional intelligence. The announcement of school “behaviour hubs” last week sent completely the wrong message. Millions of people’s lives have been disrupted by coronavirus. Tens of th
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Berlin police are investigating a possible breach of social distancing rules at an illegal star-studded party held by luxury fashion label Bottega Veneta, after leaked footage of the event inside private members club Soho House caused outrage in a city whose cherished nightlife has been on hold for ordinary clubbers for over a year.A presentation of the Italian fashion house’s latest collection at Berlin’s famous and exclusive Berghain nightclub last Friday was attended by a host of celebrity guests including Nigerian singer Burna Boy.Grammy award-winner Burna Boy later that evening posted a video on Instagram that showed him dancing behind the turntables inside the crowded restaurant on
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Macaulay Culkin and Brenda Song have welcomed their first child: a son named Dakota Song Culkin, born on April 5. In an exclusive to Esquire published Monday, the couple announced that the child was named in honor of Culkin’s late sister Dakota, who died in 2008 at the age of 29. The new parents told Esquire they were “overjoyed” with their new child, who weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces, at birth.  Culkin and Song have been romantically linked since they met in Thailand on the set of the film “Changeland” in 2017, and said in early 2020 that they were working on starting a family.  Culkin told Esquire at the time that he and Song would “practice a lot” when it came to family pl
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The founder of an online pensions firm could be worth up to £140m on paper after the company announced it would list on the London Stock Exchange with a value of up to £384m.Romi Savova, the chief executive of PensionBee, set up the consolidation business in 2014 after having problems transferring her old workplace pension to a new provider.The company, which helps people track down their old plans and consolidate them, now has more than 81,000 customers who have moved pension assets to, or paid into, one of its investment plans.Despite having worked in banking, the 35-year-old recently said in an interview that the experience had shown her “just how difficult it is if you’re just a no
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As coronavirus swept the globe last spring, Japan portrayed the postponement of the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics until this summer as an opportunity as well as a necessity. The delayed Games would be the light at the end of the tunnel; a celebration of humanity’s victory over Covid.With around 100 days to go, that promise now looks not merely optimistic, but flat wrong. The Olympics are approaching amid a resurgence of the virus and the opposition of the vast majority of the host nation. Grumbles are a familiar part of the Games cycle, dispelled as momentum builds in the final weeks. But the current concerns go far beyond the usual worries about slow ticket sales or uncompleted venues.To
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Liberty Steel has missed deadlines to file accounts for some of its biggest British businesses, in the latest sign of the struggles facing Sanjeev Gupta’s industrial empire.Gupta is listed as director of 15 companies whose accounts are overdue at Companies House, including those that operate the Liberty Steel works in Rotherham and Stocksbridge in South Yorkshire.Other facilities with overdue accounts include those in Newport and Tredegar in south Wales, Dalzell in Scotland and Coventry in the West Midlands, plus Gupta’s Scottish aluminium smelter.Gupta is urgently seeking finance to shore up the loose collection of companies that are gathered together under the banner of GFG Alliance, i
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Credit...Mike Cohen for The New York TimesApril 12, 2021, 8:37 a.m. ETAs corporate America continues to push back against a wave of restrictive voting laws under discussion across the United States, Big Law is joining the fight.A coalition of 60 major law firms has come together “to challenge voter suppression legislation and to support national legislation to protect voting rights and increase voter participation,” said Brad Karp, the chairman of the law firm Paul Weiss and the organizer of the group, which has not been formally announced.Mr. Karp said the coalition would “emphatically denounce legislative efforts to make voting harder, not easier, for all eligible voters, by imposing
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Daniel Dae Kim is talking about his decision to leave the CBS show “Hawaii Five-0” in 2017, explaining in a recent interview that the “drastic” pay cut he took to do the show hasn’t “properly been reported.” In an interview with Vulture published Monday, the 52-year-old Korean American star revealed a bit more about what went on behind the scenes when he left the police procedural show after seven years.  “One thing that has never really properly been reported is the amount of pay cut I took to do ‘Hawaii Five-0’ from ‘Lost.’ It was drastic, and it was never made up,” said Kim, who played Chin Ho Kelly on the show. Earlier in the interview, Kim explained that he had hoped that, much like his time on “Lost,” “Hawaii Five-0” would be an ensemble show. He emphasized that “early marketing and promotion for the show” seemed to suggest he and fellow Korean American actor Grace Park would be “featured equally as prominently as anyone else.” He went on to say he was “proven to be wrong.” Both Kim and Park, who played the character Kono Kalakaua, announced in 2017 ahead of the show’s eighth season that they would not be returning; reports at the time indicated pay inequity was the root of the problem. Variety reported then that Park and Kim had been making less than their white co-stars, Alex O’Loughlin and Scott Caan. CBS reportedly offered Kim and Park “10-15% lower than what O’Loughlin and Caan” made in salary. While he didn’t give Vulture an exact number, Kim called the difference in pay between himself and O’Loughlin and Caan “significant,” adding that his goal at the negotiating table was simply to “make us all equal.” “Make us all the ensemble that I thought we always were, and get me back to where I was with Lost. And I didn’t think that was an unreasonable position to take,” he said. “And the thing is, it wasn’t a source of conflict for me. It was very clear and simple. I was very transparent about it with my castmates, with my showrunner, with the studio from the start. It became much more dramatic because of the way that it didn’t come together.” Despite that, Kim said h
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A steady stream of black cabs pulled up outside Goldman Sachs’ European headquarters in central London early on Monday morning, transporting bankers to their desk. For many of them, it is the first time in more than a year they have been back to the office after the relaxation of the government’s coronavirus lockdown regulations.Stepping out of one cab is Ben, a risk strategy officer who declined to give his surname and who is returning to Goldman’s £1.2bn Plumtree Court after months working from his flat in Islington.“I’m actually feeling pretty good about coming back to the office,” he says. “It will give some structure to the day – it is hard to stop working when you’re working from home.”The 28-year-old is confident the office will be a safe working environment. “They have done quite a lot of work preparing,” he says. “We are getting [coronavirus] tested twice a week.”Many Goldman Sachs workers had been away from their London offices for more than a year. Photograph: Andy Hall/The ObserverHe is looking forward to seeing his colleagues again. “But most of the guys I normally work with aren’t back yet,” he says. “And we are all going to spread out for social distancing, so I guess it’s going to be harder to have the bants.”The US bank Go
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Thomas Tuchel has warned Chelsea that they will be in danger of squandering their commanding 2-0 lead over Porto if they lose themselves in dreams of winning the Champions League.Given Tuchel’s history in this competition, it is unsurprising he is taking nothing for granted before returning to Seville for the second leg of his side’s quarter-final against Porto on Tuesday night. Chelsea’s manager famously lost from this position two years ago, going out in the last 16 to a weakened Manchester United on away goals, and knows from bitter experience the tie is not over yet.In Tuchel’s view Chelsea, who are also gearing up for their FA Cup semi-final against Manchester City on Saturday, must focus on playing their natural game after winning last week’s away leg. The German does not want his players dwelling on the past, even though he is in a rush to collect his first piece of silverware after arriving at Stamford Bridge in January.“If you win consecutive games of course you can win titles,” Tuchel said. “Chelsea has the culture, history and mentality to do so. I am here to win games and titles. That is what I demand of myself, so why should we now say anything different? That we want to win in five years or three years or two years? Now is the time.“But there is no match other than the next game and no other obstacle to overcome than Porto tomorrow. We should not get lost in dreams and hopes and speeches and whatever. We are here to focus on reality and hopefully after tomorrow we can talk about the semi-final.”Although Chelsea lead Porto thanks to goals from Mason Mount and Ben Chilwell, Tuchel does not see any value in trying to be too clever against Sergio Conceicão’s awkward side. “We don’t approach games like this,” he said. “It’s important to play the best game possible again.“In terms of adapting to the result, it’s easier for Porto because they know what they need to do to go through. If we start adapting we could easily lose our heads. What does it mean? That it’s enough to lose one-zero? It’s good to have a draw, or better to have one-zero for us. Why should we enter into this thinking?“This is the challenge –
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The union is not in peril (Union in peril as PM ‘speaks for England alone’, former civil servant warns, 12 April). It is a political Norwegian Blue parrot, nailed to its perch but clearly, to any rational observer, an ex-union. Hitler and Napoleon failed, but Boris Johnson will go down in history as the man who destroyed the UK. Tony Blair and John Major warned that a mismanaged Brexit would prove disastrous to the Good Friday agreement. Johnson and his supporters went for an extreme form of Brexit, deciding to leave the EU customs union and single market, from which the present Northern Ireland disaster directly, predictably and inevitably followed. The chances are high that a referendum will result in a vote for Irish reunification within the lifetime of this parliament.In Scotland, there is not a single politician who can credibly make a case for the union. Belatedly, politicians are talking about new constitutional arrangements to accommodate Scottish aspirations. After the breaching of international and UK law by this government, the most blatantly corrupt, callous and incompetent one for more than 100 years, no one in Scotland, or anywhere else for that matter, is going to trust anything Johnson says. He has brilliantly made the case that there is no alternative to Scottish independence.John Cookson Bournemouth, Dorset The Conservative and Unionist party should be renamed – perhaps retaining “Con” in its title to reflect the lies that have enabled the government to avoid the simple truth that a hard Brexit would threaten the union by angering one or other community in Northern Ireland, depending on where the border with the EU fell. No wonder Boris Johnson is “deeply concerned” (Report, 8 April), as he created this situation.Given his track record on double dealing, the plan must be to ignore the border in the Irish Sea and manoeuvre the EU into choosing between re-establishing a land border and taking the blame for all the possible consequences of that, or allowing a flood of unregulated UK products into the EU via Ireland. This would, of course, put an end to any remaining faith in the word of this government.Adrian CoskerHitchin, Hertfords
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12.58pm EDT 12:58 The teams are out! West Brom wear their famous navy blue and white stripes, while Southampton wear their first-choice St-Mary’s-in-negative red shirts with white sash. It’s a cool but clear evening at the highest league ground in England. We’ll be off in a minute, after a quick Baggies blast of the Liquidator. 12.50pm EDT 12:50 Ralph Hasenhuttl’s turn. “The team deserve to play again. Turning the ta
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Prof Alan Roberts, in giving his opinion on the ability of fish to experience pain (Can fish feel pain? The jury is still out, Letters, 7 April), neglected to mention the wealth of published scientific evidence outside of behavioural and hormonal responses.I was the first to identify the existence of nociceptors in a fish, the rainbow trout, in 2002. These are specialised receptors for detecting injury-causing stimuli, and their physiology is strikingly similar to those found in mammals, including humans. Since then, my laboratory and others across the world have shown that the physiology, neurobiology, molecular biology and brain activity that many fish species show in response to painful stimuli is comparable to mammals.Further, adverse changes in behaviour are seen when fish experience
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A cardiologist testified in former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin’s trial Monday that George Floyd had an “exceptionally strong heart,” undermining the defense claim that preexisting heart issues played a major role in Floyd’s death. Dr. Jonathan Rich, retained by the prosecution as a heart expert, said there was “absolutely no evidence” that Floyd had a negative heart condition.  “Every indicator is that Mr. Floyd had actually an exceptionally strong heart,” testified Rich, a cardiologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Bystander and surveillance video showed Chauvin and two other officers pinning Floyd, a Black man, facedown on the street for nine minutes and 29 seconds on May 25, 2020. Chauvin, who is white, knelt on Floyd’s neck the entire time, even after Floyd ceased moving and breathing. Chauvin has been charged with second- and third-degree murder as well as second-degree manslaughter.  Chauvin’s attorney, Eric Nelson, has argued that Chauvin’s actions did not cause Floyd’s death. Instead, Nelson has claimed, factors contributing to Floyd’s death include heart disease, high blood pressure and drug use. Rich testified Mond
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When the Indian Point nuclear power plant shuts, its lost output will be filled primarily by generators that burn fuels that contribute to climate change.Credit...Uli Seit for The New York TimesApril 12, 2021Updated 12:28 p.m. ETFor most of his long political career, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo railed against the dangers of having a nuclear power plant operating just 25 miles away from New York City, saying its proximity to such a densely populated metropolis defied “basic sanity.’’But now, the plant is preparing to shut down, and New York is grappling with the adverse impact the closing will have on another of Mr. Cuomo’s ambitious goals: sharply reducing the state’s reliance on fossil fuels.So far, most of the electricity produced by the nuclear plant, known as Indian Point, has been replaced by power generated by plants that burn natural gas and emit more pollution. And that trade-off will become more pronounced once Indian Point’s last reactor shuts down on April 30.“It’s topsy-turvy,” said Isuru Seneviratne, a clean-energy investor who is a member of the steering committee of Nuclear New York, which has lobbied to keep Indian Point running. The pronuclear group calculated that each of Indian Point’s reactors had been producing more power than all of the wind turbines and solar panels in the state combined.When Mr. Cuomo announced four years ago that Indian Point — perched on the east bank of the Hudson River in the village of Buchanan — would be phased out, the plant was producing about one-quarter of New York City’s power. But the governor had already laid out his plan to have 50 percent of the state’s energy come from renewable sources — wind
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The BBC’s wall-to-wall coverage of Prince Philip’s death has become the most complained-about moment in British television history, as viewers expressed their annoyance that shows such as EastEnders and MasterChef were replaced with royal tributes.At least 110,994 people have contacted the BBC to express their displeasure at the decision to turn most of the corporation’s TV channels and radio stations over to rolling tributes to the Queen’s husband.BBC One and BBC Two dedicated Friday evening’s programming to Philip, and their ratings fell as viewers switched off altogether, turned to streaming services or watched shows such as Gogglebox on Channel 4.According to an internal BBC complaints log seen by the Guardian, an unprecedented level of viewer feedback was received over the weekend, meaning the coverage appears to have elicited one of the most negative reactions to BBC programmes ever seen.One example comment from a member of the public included in the log said: “Coverage of this event took up the entire evening broadcast to the exclusion of all other topics, including the ongoing topic of the pandemic. Some coverage was justified, but not to this extent.”Another said: “It was sad news Prince Phillip [sic] died on Friday and I understand the BBC had to acknowledge the fact but on every single one of its channels? Why [not] just put it on one channel for those that want to listen to that drivel and the rest of us can have a bit of music.”Within hours of P
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“Boutique” charitable care homes sound exciting (UK’s care homes tap into ‘boutique vibe’ to fill empty beds, 5 April) but sadly, in my own constituency in north London, the imminent closure of the Mary Feilding Guild highlights the appalling insecurity that still exists in provision for the elderly.Sixteen residents between the ages of 85 and 104 are being kicked out of their homes, and have been given until the end of May to find somewhere else to live. In an ongoing pandemic, when vulnerable residents haven’t left the premises in over a year, it’s disgraceful that they can be
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Two people have been arrested after a newborn baby was found dead in a supermarket car park, West Midlands police have said.A 21-year-old woman and a 36-year-old man have been arrested in connection with the baby boy’s death and are currently in custody.Police issued an appeal to find the baby’s mother after the child was discovered by a member of the public outside a Morrisons in Bilston, Wolverhampton on Sunday morning.The mother has been identified and was taken to hospital to receive appropriate care, the force said.Police are investigating the circumstances in which the baby died and
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The global coronavirus pandemic is still growing exponentially, the World Health Organization said on Monday as it reported 4.4m cases in the last week, the seventh straight week of rising numbers.The latest global figures represent a 9% increase in infections on last week and a 5% rise in deaths.As lockdown restrictions were eased in England, the WHO’s director general, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said “confusion, complacency and inconsistency in public health measures” were prolonging the pandemic.He said it might be months before the global situation was brought under control and only
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American fashion will be the theme of the Costume Institute’s highly anticipated two-part Met Gala, the first of which will take place this September following last year’s cancellation due to the Covid-19 pandemic.The Met Gala has become the fashion Oscars, and is traditionally hosted by a well-dressed public figure. Amanda Gorman, the 22-year-old inaugural poet who recited her poem at Joe Biden’s inauguration, is rumoured to be this year’s co-host alongside Met Gala chairwoman and Vogue editor-in-chief, Anna Wintour, and the US designer Tom Ford.Gorman became a fashion fixture when she wore a sunshine yellow Prada hairband and coat to the inauguration. She appeared on the May cover of US Vogue wearing Louis Vuitton and Dior. The Costume Institute did not deny the rumours, but said
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Your Money AdviserThe federal government and most states pushed back the date to May 17, but others have gone their own way. And if you make estimated tax payments, the deadline remains April 15.Credit...Brian BritiganPublished April 9, 2021Updated April 12, 2021, 12:25 p.m. ETTax filing is a little more complicated this year.The deadline to file a 2020 individual federal return and pay any tax owed has been extended to May 17, about a month later than the typical April deadline. The Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service moved the date to give filers, tax preparers and the I.R.S. itself more time to adjust to disruptions from the coronavirus pandemic.Most states are following the extended federal deadlines, and a few have adopted even more generous extensions.But the I.R.S.
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David Cameron is, we are told, very embarrassed. But shame might seem a more fitting emotion for an ex-prime minister caught trying to wheedle private favours from former underlings on behalf of a company from which he personally stood to make a fortune.No wonder he spent a month ducking questions about his work for the failed financier Lex Greensill, which will now be subject to an inquiry led by the Cabinet Office. Only on Sunday did Cameron eventually concede that, on reflection, he should have lobbied government on behalf of his new boss via “only the most formal of channels” – rather than going over officials’ heads to text Rishi Sunak or meet Matt Hancock for a private drink.Coming from someone who was himself accused of running an overly casual “chumocracy” when in power
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The “Ginger Assassin” just killed it in a bowling match. A 7-10 split is difficult under any circumstances, but Anthony Neuer made it look easy Sunday at the U.S. Open in Reno, Nevada. Neuer converted the improbable spare, marking just the fourth time that’s happened in a televised Professional Bowlers Association Tour match ― and the first time in 30 years, the PBA noted. What made the shot even more epic was the call of announcer Rob Stone. “My goodness, the Ginger Assassin just dropped a 7-10. You bet, kid! You bet!” Stone cried. “Oh man, give me some oxygen and water!” — PBA Tour (@PBATour) April 11, 2021 “It was pretty cool, honestly,” Neuer said of his feat, per Sports Illustrated. Neuer achieved viral fame, but lost that semifinal to Jakob Butturff, 257-203,
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For 30 years, the Supreme Court applied a simple rule when someone with a religious objection to a state law sought an exemption from that law. So long as the law applied equally to everyone, regardless of whether someone is religious or not, then everyone had to comply with the law. As the Court held in Employment Division v. Smith (1990), religious objectors must follow “neutral law[s] of general applicability.” Ever since Justice Amy Coney Barrett joined the Court last fall, however, the Supreme Court has been rapidly dismantling Smith. On Friday night, the Court fired a bullet into Smith’s heart. It ruled that people of faith who want to gather in relatively large groups in someone’s home must be allowed to do so, despite the fact that California limits all in-home gatherin
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Daniel Kaluuya in Judas and the Black Messiah, Alan Kim in Minari, Gary Oldman in Mank, and Anthony Hopkins in The Father. Warner Bros; A24; Netflix; Sony Pictures Classics The merits, demerits, and awards chances of each film in a weird year at the Oscars. By Apr 12, 2021, 12:15pm EDT The most prestigious award at the Oscars is the Best Picture trophy, and every year, between five and 10 movies compete for
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This year, eight films are in the running for Best Picture, the most prestigious award at the Oscars. That’s a lot of movies to watch, analyze, and enjoy! So in the days before the ceremony on April 25, Vox staffers are looking at each of the nominees in turn. What makes this film appealing to Academy voters? What makes it emblematic of the year? And should it win? Below, Vox film critic Alissa Wilkinson, The Goods editor Meredith Haggerty, and culture writer Aja Romano discuss The Trial of the Chicago 7, Aaron Sorkin’s courtroom drama based on real events from 1968 and 1969. For better or worse, The Trial of the Chicago 7 is peak Sorkin Alissa Wilkinson: I think The Trial of the Chicago 7 may be the most “Hollywoody” of this year’s Best Picture nominees — to the point that
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France has activated its foreign ministry crisis center after seven Catholic clergy – five of them Haitian and two French – were abducted in Haiti and the kidnappers demanded a million-dollar ransom.The statement came as the French Bishops’ Conference and other French clergy expressed “their deep concern” and urged “the kidnappers to free the men and women of peace they have kidnapped and not to add more hatred where there is already poverty and insecurity”.The five priests and two nuns were abducted on Sunday morning in Croix-des-Bouquets, a town north-east of the capital, Port-au-Prince, while they were “on their way to the installation of a new parish priest”, Father Loudger Mazile, the spokesman of the Bishop’s Conference for the island nation, told AFP.The kidnappe
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The Forest Green Rovers chairman has said he could “break some new ground” by appointing the first female manager to work in English football’s top four divisions.Dale Vince – the founder of the green energy supplier Ecotricity and chairman of Forest Green since 2010 – will hold interviews in the next fortnight after receiving almost 100 applications for the position since sacking Mark Cooper on Monday. It is understood that will include female candidates after Vince said “anything was possible” for the League Two club known for taking an innovative approach, which includes plans to build the world’s first entirely wooden stadium and a shirt made partly from recycled coffee waste.“I think we’ll take a new direction in our recruitment. Maybe we’ll break some new ground
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An indisputable truth of hereditary monarchy is that promotion to the “top job” is accompanied by deep personal sorrow. So it will be for the Prince of Wales, who will eventually take the throne as he mourns his mother.But the loss of his father will have had no less profound an effect on Prince Charles. And, though on any official level it does not alter his royal status, it does change the family dynamic.The Duke of Edinburgh’s death, as the Queen expressed, has left “a huge void”. Philip was the patriarchal head of “the firm”. This is the mantle Charles will now assume.This role was most symbolically underscored when Charles was the only family member to visit his father during his recent spell in hospital.He spent 30 minutes at the duke’s bedside at King Edward VII’s
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Twenty-five Chinese military jets breached Taiwan’s defence zone on Monday, the island’s government has said, after a senior US official warned of an “increasingly aggressive” Beijing.The defence ministry scrambled aircraft to broadcast warnings to leave after Chinese jets, including 18 fighters, entered the island’s southwest air defence identification zone for a 10th straight day.The incursion – the largest in a year – came after the US secretary of state, Antony Blinken, on Sunday warned China not to attempt to change the status quo around Taiwan, saying to do so would be a “serious mistake”.Democratic, self-ruled Taiwan lives under the constant threat of invasion by China, which has vowed to one day seize the island, by force if needed.On Friday the US state departmen
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“Minari” star Youn Yuh-jung is still vying for Oscars glory, but she just won the awards season with her blunt-in-the-best way acceptance speech at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards. After making history at the SAG Awards for her performance as the lovable, foul-mouthed grandmother in Lee Isaac Chung’s feature film, the veteran Korean actor picked up another major accolade over the weekend.  Cementing her standing as the front-runner for the Academy Awards later this month, Youn was crowned Best Supporting Actress at the BAFTAs, where she accepted the award virtually from presenter David Oyelowo. The visibly shocked star, whose career spans five decades in her home country, started her speech by sweetly introducing herself to the crowd. “Hello, Br
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HEUNG-MIN FOR YOUR SUPPERFood fights are extremely uncommon in the serious world of professional association football. Yes, there was the time in the early 2000s when Cesc Fàbregas attempted to spice up a rather bland margherita by flinging it at the startled pepperoni-hued face of Sir Alex Ferguson. The moment on the Channel 4 documentary Club for a Fiver when Orient boss John Sitton offered most of his squad outside for a fight at half-time, telling them that they should bring their dinner because they’re going to need it. And of course there was the most notorious incident of all, when 1930s England hard man Wilf Copping came at Stanley Matthews in the FA canteen with a slice of Spam, neatly cut across the diagonal, and rammed it sideways into the young winger’s mouth with such force that it nearly left him with a permanent, albeit very tasty, Chelsea Grin [subs, please check]. But all in all, nutritious substances rarely feature in the game’s discourse.So imagine the Fiver’s horror, shock, surprise, shock and horror when sustenance platters were yesterday flung back-and-forth between two grown adults aged 48 and 58. Manchester United’s hot-tempered boss Ole Gunnar Solskjær, enraged to the exact Pantone number (185) of Papa Cesc’s pimped pizza, responded to Tottenham striker Son Heung-min’s OTT reaction to being brushed in the face by Scott McTominay with a disproportionate response of his own: “If that was my son and he stays down and he needs his mates to help him up, he doesn’t get food because that’s embarrassing.” All of which may explain why young Noah Solskjær is on record as saying his hero growing up was not his dad but Wayne Rooney, w
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The return of the Hawaiian shirt has been celebrated in the style press, as celebrities including Bill Murray, Rihanna and Sophie Turner have been seen to wear them.But according to Zara Anishanslin, a fellow at the Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton, people should think twice before wearing the garments.Rihanna in Los Angeles on 29 March. Photograph: Rachpoot/MEGA/GC Images“They are the fashion equivalent of a plantation wedding,” said Anishanslin. “They could be seen as fashionable embodiments of the history of American colonization, imperialism and racism against Hawaii’s indigenous inhabitants. People might want to think twice about whether the look is worth the weight of its associative past.”Hawaiian shirts have also been co-opted by the “Boogaloo” movement, white supremacists who advocate war against the federal government.Initially made from leftover cloth intended for kimonos, the shirts were popularised by American veterans of the second world war. Soon Japanese motifs were replaced by Hawaiian ones and a cultural touchstone was born.About five years ago, Hawaiian shirts became part of the “dadcore” trend. Then the “Boogaloo” movement chose to combine them with camouflage trousers, body armour and weapons.“It might not be an aesthetically pleasing combination but it’s a smart one, in terms of picking out your fellow members of the group in the crowd,” Anishanslin said.Armed ‘Boogaloo Bois’ near the Virginia state capitol on 18 January. Photograph: Samuel Corum/EPALast year, Dr Reece Jones of the University of Hawaii wrote about how the brightly coloured shirts came to symbolise something much darker.“I know this se
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By winning the Masters, the publicity-shy golfer will face a news media spotlight that trails every move of Japanese athletes abroad.Credit...Doug Mills/The New York TimesApril 12, 2021, 11:53 a.m. ETTOKYO — Hideki Matsuyama has never been a fan of the spotlight. Even as he rose to become Japan’s most successful male golfer, he did his best to avoid the attention lavished on the every move of other Japanese athletes who have shined on the global stage.But with his win on Sunday at the Masters in Augusta, Ga., the glare will now be inescapable. His victory, the first by a Japanese man in one of golf’s major championships, is the fulfillment of a long-held ambition for the country, and it guarantees that he will be feted as a national hero, with the adoration and scrutiny that follows.Japan is a nation of avid golfers, and the game’s status as the sport of choice for the Western business and political elite has given it a special resonance. Success in sports has long been a critical gauge of the country’s global standing, with the United States and Europe often the standard by which Japan measures itself.“We have always dreamed of winning the Masters,” said Andy Yamanaka, secretary-general of the Japan Golf Association. “It’s a very moving moment for all of us. I think a lot of people cried when he finished.”Those tears reflect, in part, an island nation that sees itself as smaller and less powerful than other major countries, even though it is the world’s third largest economy. That means athletes who represent it globally are often burdened with expectations and pressures that transcend the field of play.The country’s news media has followed the exploits of its athletes abroad with an intensity that some have found unnerving. When the baseball star Ichiro Suzuki joined the Seattle Mariners, Japanese news organizations set up bureaus in the city devoted exclusively to covering him. Television stations here broadcast seemingly obscure major league games just in case a Japanese player appears. Even modest scoring performances by a Japanese N.B.A. player can trigger headlines.Golf is no exception. Even during low-stakes tournaments, a gaggle
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Talk to Josh Kiszka, lead singer of the band Greta Van Fleet, about his time growing up in a small town in the American midwest and you’d think he was describing the life of Huckleberry Finn. “We were outside most of the time, building rafts and taking them down the river,” the 24-year-old told the Guardian. “There wasn’t a lot of television in the house. And when all the other kids wanted cell phones, I fought that. I preferred to take a hike.”Kiszka’s parents strongly encouraged him and his two brothers in that pursuit. “My mother even took the clocks off the wall at one point,” he said. “They were the opposite of helicopter parents. They taught us to do things independently.”That mind-set goes a long way towards explaining the insular world that shaped the music of the Kiszka brothers who comprise three fourths of Greta Van Fleet. They include Josh’s fraternal twin Jake, who plays guitar, and their younger brother Sam, on bass. (The sole non-sibling member is their close friend, drummer Danny Wagner). The musicians’ remove from the modern world also helps explains why their sonic taste falls so far from that of most in their generation, as well as part of why they have drawn so much scorn from contemporary critics. While Greta Van Fleet’s debut albu
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Part of HuffPost Politics. ©2021 BuzzFeed, Inc. All rights reserved. New Mexico Governor To Sign Bill Legalizing Recreational Marijuana SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham was set Monday to sign legislation that will legalize recreational marijuana use and sales in the state, making it the seventh since last November to do so. The governor, a Democrat, has supported marijuana reform as a way to create jobs and shore up state revenue. Her office in an advisory said she was scheduling a bill signing ceremony and news conference for later in the day. New Mexico voters ousted ardent opponents of legalization from the state Senate in the 2020 Democratic primary, opening the way for legalization of recreational marijuana. The governor called a special legislative session to tackle the issue in late March after legalization efforts faltered. Legislators rallied behind a legalization framework from state Rep. Javier Martinez of Albuquerque that provides automated procedures for expunging past pot convictions. The bill gives the governor a strong hand in oversight of recreational marijuana through her appointed superintendent of the Regulation and Licensing Department. Regulators can put a cap on marijuana cultivation quantities and impose a per-plant state fee of up to $50 a year. Some of the state’s medical marijuana producers lobbied for market controls amid concerns that marijuana prices might plummet with the legalization of recreational marijuana, undermining investments and employment. People age 21 and over will be allowed to buy and possess up to 2 ounces (28 grams) of marijuana outside their homes. Home marijuana growers will be allowed to grow up to six plants per person, or 12 per household. The scent of marijuana will no longer be grounds for police seizures. Calling all HuffPost superfans! Sign up for membership to become a founding member and help shape HuffPost's next chapter BEFORE YOU GO PHOTO GALLERY Who Supports Marijuana Legalization?
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It can be quite easy, reading the press, to believe that the pandemic will never end. Even when good news about vaccines started to arrive in the autumn, this grim narrative managed to harden. In the past month, you could read “five reasons that herd immunity is probably impossible”, even with mass vaccination; breathless reports about yet-uncharacterised but potentially ruinous variants, such as the “double mutant” variant in India, or two concerning variants potentially swapping mutations and teaming up in a “nightmare scenario” in California; get ready, some analysts said, for the “permanent pandemic”.Among many people I know, a sort of low-grade doom has set in. They think the vaccines are a mere sliver of hope, only holding back the virus for a short time before being worn down by a rush of ever-cleverer variants that will slosh around us, perhaps for ever. Things might briefly get better, they believe, but only by a little, and even that is tenuous.However despite such dark talk, and the potential difficulties along the way of vaccine rollout, I still remain optimistic. Since about the midway point of last year I have believed that extremely potent vaccines are going to end the pandemic. They’ll do so by either driving the disease down to near-extinction, or so constraining its force and spread that it becomes a manageable concern, like measles or mumps. I actually think this will happen fairly soon, as long as we get everyone – the whole world, not just the rich – vaccinated.The scientific case for optimism is straightforward. The vaccines we have are beyond very good, they’re among the most effective ever created. They appear to be potent in real-life situations, and results so far show that protection is long-lasting. Crucially, new results in the US show that the mRNA vaccines used there effectively prevented coronavirus infections – not just serious symptoms – in results similar to those previously reported by a UK-based study. And another study in the UK suggested that vaccinated groups were less likely to spread coronavirus infection overall. This is exactly what we need to choke out the pandemic: vaccines that don’t ju
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The Scottish Cup fourth-round tie between Rangers and Celtic has been pushed back to a Sunday 3pm kick-off, one of several football matches to be rescheduled in order to avoid clashing with the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral this Saturday.The Old Firm fixture at Ibrox was originally set for 4pm on Saturday, an hour after the start of the ceremonial royal funeral at Windsor Castle. Saturday’s Premier League match between Wolves and Sheffield United, originally scheduled for 3pm, will kick off at 8.15pm.The day’s other English top-flight game, between Newcastle and West Ham, will be played at
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John Oliver devoted the main segment of Sunday’s Last Week Tonight to a perennially overlooked healthcare issue in the US: nursing homes and elder care. “We tend to try to avoid thinking about it,” said Oliver, “but the truth is, whether due to old age or disability, many of us do or will require help with daily living.”From the Cuomo administration’s manipulation of nursing home Covid data to the terrible infection rates – nursing homes and assisted care facilities account for nearly a third of US Covid deaths – “the pandemic pushed an already strained system, to the absolut
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Russia’s fortnight-long military buildup to the east and south of Ukraine has helped it mass an estimated 80,000 troops in the border region in an attention-grabbing exercise that is increasingly occupying western thinking.Tanks and other artillery units have also been arriving at Voronezh, east of Ukraine, according to Jane’s, a military intelligence firm, and a staging ground for about 3,000 troops been established to the south of the city.A nervous government in Kyiv says Russian forces in the Voronezh region number 40,000. It says a further 40,000 are now stationed in Crimea, which was seized in a surprise operation by Moscow in 2014.“This movement stands out as possibly the largest unannounced movement of troops since Russia’s invasion of Crimea,” said Thomas Bullock, an analyst at Jane’s. He estimates that several thousand troops have arrived in the last fortnight from as far afield as Siberia to the east and the Estonian border in the north.Nor is it just the size of the redeployment that has attracted attention. Its broad composition, including short-range ballistic missile systems, plus a strengthening of the Black Sea fleet, has many of the components of a force military experts say could attack Ukraine, with the possible exception of combat aircraft.That would represent a dramatic escalation of the conflict that has simmered since Crimea was taken and Russian-backed separatists seized the border Donbas region seven years ago. Already an estimated 14,000 people have been killed.Rob Lee, a doctoral student who follows Russian deployments at King’s College London’s war studies department, said: “In this case Russia is moving the military assets near the border that they would use in an actual invasion. I think it is a demonstration, but it is disconcerting because it isn’t like previous scares.”In response, Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, has been engaged in an intense bout of diplomatic activity, calling for the west to strengthen its presence in the region – and pressing for a pathway to join Nato, the membership action plan, which the alliance has yet to grant despite promising to do so as long ago as 2008.Turkey said over the weekend that two US destroyers were expected to enter the Black Sea, although they would be no match for the Russian fleet, with 45 vessels. The UK, which signed a military cooperation agr
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Sen. Rick Scott (Fla.) presented Donald Trump with the National Republican Senatorial Committee’s inaugural “Champion for Freedom” award over the weekend at the former president’s glitzy golf resort in Florida. “President Trump is a proven champion for all Americans,” Scott, who serves as chair of the committee, said in a statement. “Throughout his administration, he made clear his commitment to getting government out of the way of people’s success, paving the way for American families and job creators to reach new heights.” If you’ve never heard of the “Champion for Freedom” award, that’s because it hasn’t existed before. The small, ceremonial dish sounds like a made-up gesture designed to placate an angry former president who spent the weekend fuming at GOP leaders ― including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) ― and lying about the 2020 presidential election, lies such as those that led to the deadly Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Trump, of course, famously loves receiving accolades of any size ― even nonexistent ones. For Scott, a potential 2024 presidential candidate, keeping Trump happy and taking back the Senate in 2022 are top priorities. The former president has already pledged to campaign against Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R) over her guilty vote in Trump’s second impeachment trial earlier this year. He’s also demonstrated his continued influence over the party, distributing highly sought-after endorsements to his most loyal supporters in Congress.  But the NRSC’s flattery of Trump is more than a little awkward considering that McConnell, the top Republican in the Senate, fiercely criticized the f
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Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA) during the first impeachment of President Donald Trump. Lieu, who served as an impeachment manager during the 2021 impeachment, is not eligible for the presidency. Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images The Capitol rioters’ apologists are still eligible to be president — and immigrant lawmakers who fought to hold Trump accountable are not. By Apr 12, 2021, 11:30am EDT Immigrants who have lived abroad or grown up with stories of political chaos know that the most violent days always start out in an eerie quiet, as January 6, 2021, did in Washington, DC. By 1:10 pm that day, after former President Donald Trump issued his call for thousands of supporters to march on the Capitol, anyone who was paying attention knew that something dangerous was about to take place. Within a matter of minutes, at the other end of the National Mall, a Capitol police officer banged on the door of Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA). “You need to evacuate immediately,” Lieu recalls the officer saying before urging him to remove the lapel pin that identified him as a member of Congress and directing him down five fl
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The mother of a victim of the London Bridge terrorist attack has described how her son was a “force for good in the world”, as an inquest heard how his killer taped knives to his hands in a toilet cubicle before killing two people and injuring three.The jury for the inquest into the deaths of Jack Merritt, 25, and Saskia Jones, 23, were shown photographs of knives, together with tape and scissors that Usman Khan left in a cubicle before beginning his attack at 1.56pm on 29 November 2019 at a prisoner rehabilitation conference at Fishmongers’ Hall.The jury was also shown a picture of the prayer book Fortress of the Muslim, which Khan dropped while he attacked Merritt. DCI Dan Brown from Scotland Yard’s counter-terrorism unit said: “It’s not an extremist book or anything like that it’s just simply a general book of prayer.”Despite his injuries, Merritt, a course coordinator for Learning Together, which was hosting the conference, managed to make it to the reception area of the building. The jury was shown graphic images of a small office where attempts to save him failed. It was also told that Merritt knew his attacker and had communicated with him before the conference.The inquest was shown CCTV images of Khan eating lunch at the same table as his second victim, Jones, a volunteer.Jones was checking in an item at the cloakroom when Khan emerged from the toilet after attacking Merritt. Still armed with two knives, Khan gestured to the cloakroom assistant to be quiet before attacking Jones, Brown said. “He stabbed her once to the neck,” he said.Seconds later Khan stabbed two other people at the conference, Stephanie Szczotko and Isobel Rowbotham, who both later recovered from their injuries, the inquest heard.Several attendees, armed with a narwhal tusk, fire extinguisher and ornamental pike, fought back and drove Khan out on to London Bridge, the inquest heard. Pictures of the make-do weapons were shown to the jury, who were told that during the struggle Khan stabbed a porter named Lukasz.After being forced out of Fishmongers’ Hall, Khan was Tasered and shot dead by police, the inquest was told. It also heard moving tributes to the victims. Merritt’s mother, Anne, said: “Jack was a force for good in the world, someone who made other people’s lives better for knowing him. We are hugely proud of who Jack was and what he stood for.“Jack’s death was a tragedy but his life was a triumph.”She read out tributes from his friends, relations and colleagues. They included a note from Merritt’s girlfriend, Leanne O’Brien, who said: “Jack fit perfectly into my life, and was my biggest support and number one fan, he always got me through the really tough times when I really didn’t believe I could myself.”In a statement read to the jury, Jones’s family said: “It would be her hope that no other family is devastated and heartbroken again in similar circumstances. She should be defined as someone who battled to improve the lives of others.”It said her research into sexual violence at Cambridge University had led to a plan for her to become a police detective in victim support.Khan was 28 years old at the time of
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Amanda Northrop/Vox Four new hunting bills in the Big Sky State are reigniting a centuries-old debate. By Apr 12, 2021, 11:20am EDT Illustrations by Amanda Northrop/Vox Late this winter, Greg Gianforte, Montana’s recently elected Republican governor, trapped and shot a male wolf just outside the boundary of Yellowstone National Park at a private ranch owned by his pal Robert E. Smith, a director of the conservative Sinclair Broadcasting Group (a former campaign donor). Hunting wolves is legal in Montana, and Gianforte later told the Helena Independent Record that he’d been after one for five years. “I put a lot of time in over many, many years and not every sportsman is fortunate to ultimately harvest a wolf,” said Gianforte, who added that he planned to mount it on his wall. Not everyone who initially knew about the governor’s trophy was impressed, apparently. In the weeks after the hunt, someone tipped off a reporter with the Mountain West News Bureau that not only had the governor killed one of the 94 wolves that frequent Yellowstone, but he’d also failed to comply with a state regulation requiring hunters take a wolf-trapping course before catching an animal. Nate Hegyi, the bureau reporter, also learned that the wolf had a name, “1155.” It had worn a radio collar since 2018 when National Park Service biologists began to track his movements in and out of the park. The timing of the governor’s hunting protocol gaffe was disconcerting to conservationists already worried about the fate of Montana’s wolves. Gianforte, the first Republican governor in 16 years, would soon be deciding on several hunter-friendly bills to relax restrictions on killing wolves. The argument behind those bills — which seek to legalize a range of new hunting methods and offer reimbursement to trappers for their expenses — is that wolves in Montana are killing too many game species like elk and deer, which people like to hunt. As of 2019, there were almost 1,200 wolves in Montana, according to the state’s Fish, Wildlife, and Parks Department. (The agency hasn’t yet released numbers for 2020.) “Wolf numbers need to be reduced,” Paul Fielder, a Republican state representative behind two of the four bills, told Vox. One of them legalizes the use of snares, which catch and choke animals to death. “Allowing the snaring of wolves in Montana by licensed trappers will give wildlife managers another tool to reduce wolf numbers — especially in areas where ungulate populations are stressed by wolves,” Fielder said at a state hearing in February. There’s just one problem: This isn’t true. Parks department data doesn’t indicate that hoofed wildlife populations are stressed by wolves. Many wildlife biologists — and even the Montana W
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Name: Hot tubs.Age: Ancient, though re-popularised in the US in the late 60s, when the Jacuzzi brothers invented their jet whirlpool bath.Appearance: A large cauldron of bubbling stew made from suburban swingers.Hot tubs aren’t just for swingers. They’re for people with arthritis, and for those who like to swing. Actually they’re for pretty much everybody these days. Ebay sales jumped by more than 1,000% this time last year.Why did that happen? We can’t all have arthritis. Because so many people were stuck at home during lockdown last April, when we also had a spell of fine weather. Hot tub retailers rapidly ran out of stock, and have been playing catchup ever since.They didn’t see
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Ultraviolence is too often seen as a cinematic end in itself – but the results are often ugly, boring, or both. This Canadian home-invasion thriller falls into this trap, so ferociously focused on the scent of blood that it double-kneecaps one character not once but twice: by hammer, then by gunshot. But given that co-director Gabriel Carrer’s past credits include Kill, The Demolisher, and Death on Scenic Drive, we probably shouldn’t be expecting The Bridges of Madison County here.The film starts as a mysterious and alarmingly claustrophobic three-hander: nurse Romina (Lora Burke) knocks off a long Halloween shift and comes home to find that wild-eyed Chris (Nick Smyth) has taken her l
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The apparent attack by Israel on Iran’s nuclear enrichment facility appears to be the latest episode in an increasing tit-for-tat cyberwar. Both sides have already targeted so-called industrial control systems [ICS], which have emerged as a key weakness for countries across the globe.While Iran described the latest attack as “sabotage”, Israeli media called it a cyber-attack.The vulnerability of ICS systems, and similar so-called “operating technology” used in industrial processes and large infrastructure plants – from electrical grids, to steel, chemical and water treatment plants – was demonstrated more than a decade ago by revelation of the US-Israeli Stuxnet malware attack
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A peace agreement nearly a quarter-century ago helped transform Northern Ireland after decades of bitter conflict. But new issues are reawakening old feuds.Credit...Peter Morrison/Associated PressApril 12, 2021, 10:59 a.m. ETAdding to the world’s sectarian flash points, the British territory of Northern Ireland has roared back into the news, its relative calm punctured by violent rioting among groups that had made peace 23 years ago.The reasons for the breakdown are intertwined with Britain’s exit from the European Union and the stresses of the Covid-19 pandemic. But they have demonstrated the combustible potency of the old feuds between a largely Catholic side that wants the territory t
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“I’ve been locked up for two weeks, as if I was in a cage, and I feel like a fight,” Zinedine Zidane said, so he went out and found one. Having tested positive for the coronavirus and isolated at home, he had heard the whispers, read the press, taken the hits and knew what lay beneath. Worse, he had watched his team. He had seen his assistant David Bettoni insist that Real Madrid’s fans “still believe because our DNA is to fight to the end” but even in empty grounds – where there are no whistles and no white hankies, judgments not delivered directly, nor pressure applied on the president – he was aware that many didn’t, not entirely. It was the start of February and it was
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LondonCustomers leave an Oxford Street store with bags full of shopping Photograph: Graeme Robertson/The Guardian
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In 2019, polls found that the police were one of the most trusted public institutions in America, more trustworthy than Congress or journalists or religious leaders. But in 2020, after George Floyd died at the hands of police and wave of protests against police brutality spread across the US, police drove their vans into crowds of protesters, shot paint canisters at people standing on their own porches, fired rubber bullets at reporters and arrested other reporters live on television, and pulled down protesters’ masks to pepper spray them in the face in the midst of a respiratory pandemic. There is a gap between the ways in which the police behave and the ways in which the public perceives them. And for a long time, police have behaved as though they think pop culture is responsible for that gap. In 1910, the International Association of Chiefs of Police was moved to adopt a resolution condemning the movie business for the way it depicted police officers. The movies, the IACP complained, made crime look fun and glamorous. Meanwhile, the police were “sometimes made to appear ridiculous.” It was true: The movies did tend to make the police look ridiculous in the 1910s. From 1912 to 1917, the incompetent Keystone Cops bumbled their way across the silent screen. From 1914 to 1918, animated Police Dog shorts showed a police force unable to prevent adorable Officer Piffles (a good dog) from getting his owner into one scrape after another. And in 1917’s Easy Street, Charlie Chaplin’s tramp-turned-police-officer was only able to save his girl from a mob of criminals after accidentally sitting on a drug addict’s needle and picking up superpowers from the force of the inadvertent injection. Police in popular culture of the 1910s were inept buffoons to be mocked and, well, ridiculed. And the real-life police reacted with outrage. How could the police do their jobs if people thought of them as losers who could be foiled by a cartoon dog? Today, the police of popular culture have no such problem. Our screens are filled with depictions of heroic cop after heroic cop. We’ve got reactionary heroic cops and liberal heroic cops; white heroic cops and Black heroic cops; heroic cops who will work outside the system when the situation calls for it and never face a problem because they are always right, and heroic cops who never have to work against the system because the system itself is always right. We live in a world in which police frequently respond to peaceful protesters with tear gas and rubber bullets. We also live in a world in which the heroic police officer is one of our culture’s default protagonists. And the police are our protagonists because they put in the work to become so. The modern police procedural was built by the police Left, the incompetent Keystone Cops, photographed by Harry Vallejo, 1912. Right, Jack Webb as Dragnet’s heroic Joe Friday, pictured here on the DVD case. Left, WFinch/Wikimedia Commons. Right, Alpha Video. The ridiculous police of 1910s pop culture didn’t come out of now
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Lady Shirley Williams, one of the original “gang of four” Labour politicians who split to form the Social Democratic party, has died, the Liberal Democrats have announced.She became the MP for Hitchin in 1964 and stepped down from the House of Lords in 2016, having served more than 50 years in politics.During her career, Williams was a Labour cabinet minister under James Callaghan, and later became the first SDP member elected in a byelection in 1981.She became president of the new party and supported its merger with the Liberals to form the Liberal Democrats.Ed Davey, the Lib Dem leader,
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In a year of uncertainty, many people turned to the game for answers.Credit...Tayler Smith for The New York TimesApril 12, 2021, 10:34 a.m. ETBack in early 2019, Missy Steak started hosting Drag Trivia, a twice-monthly event in the Boston area featuring performances by her fellow drag queens.Between acts, Missy would pose questions to the audience about pop culture and current events, gently teasing those who hadn’t been keeping up with the latest on, say, the General Motors worker strike.When Covid-19 began to spread around the country, Drag Trivia fizzled out. (Zoom can miss the finer poin
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Jean-Marie “JC” Carroll, songwriter, guitaristI was 19 and living a double life. Night-time punk rocker, then I’d flatten my hair down with water and go to work in the bank in the daytime. The original punk scene was about 200 to 300 people in London and Manchester, but once we started doing gigs we saw all these kids from small towns who weren’t part of the metropolitan elite and wanted to be part of it. I thought: “These people need a song.”We were kids from Surrey, so we knew all about being seen as oiks from the suburbs. We had cheap guitars with a scratchy, twangy sound. I started playing the riff and once I had the best part of a song I took it to the band. I wanted something at the beginning to announce its arrival, so played this twangy intro. It is actually the reveille, the bugle call you hear when the cavalry charges on old films.When I wrote “the youth club group used to wanna be free, now they want anarchy”, I was referring to the group Free, who sang Alright Now. The idea was that the youth club group had been a bit heavy metal but they’d cut their hair and gone punk. The line “annoying the neighbours with his punk rock electric guitar” came from something my mum used to say to me when I played mine: “Stop that bloody racket! You’re annoying the neighbours.”The Sound of the Suburbs was one of Steve Lillywhite’s first productions. He was our drummer Adrian’s brother. Steve had us doing handclaps, which he’d done on Do Anything You Wanna Do by Eddie and the Hot Rods. Then he took his tape recorder down to Staines railway station and recorded the British Rail announcer calling out the towns we came from “Camberley, Bagshot, Lightwater … This is Staines.” You can hear that on the record during the instrumental breakdown.We played the song for the first time when we supported the Vibrators at the Marquee in London on 13 August 1978, and the crowd went crazy. We knew it was going to be a big record because it was like they already knew it. It wasn’t our song – it was their song.Nicky Tesco, singer, songwriterWhen we started getting interviewed by the press, I used to joke about being from the suburbs and coming up to London to find a grimy alley to take our picture in but they were full up with other bands queueing to take theirs. That’s the way we played it, but our following was full of kids from out-of-town places such as Staines, Finchley or Woking. Phill Jupitus was from Essex – we’re still really good friends – and he slept on the floor of my bedsit with another kid while my then girlfriend and I were in the bed. England footballer Stuart Pearce was in the Fulham crew and went to all the punk gigs.We were supporting someone at, I think, Aylesbury Friars, and JC said: “We need an anthem.” He came up with a couple of verses, the chorus and the middle eight. I came up with the third verse, starting “Saturday shoppers crowding out the centre of town / Young blokes sitting on the benches shouting at the young girls walking around / Johnny stands there at his window looking at the night …” Once we got in the rehearsal room it became a band effort. Nigel Bennett played the
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April 12, 2021, 10:55 a.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 10:55 a.m. ETReporting from MinneapolisProsecutors have called Dr. Jonathan Rich, a cardiologist from Chicago, to the stand. He follows several expert witnesses from last week who testified about George Floyd’s cause of death, blaming it on Derek Chauvin's actions. Dr. Rich said this is the first time he has ever testified in a trial.April 12, 2021, 10:53 a.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 10:53 a.m. ETThe state called Dr. Jonathan Rich, a cardiologist from Chicago, to take the stand on Friday. He was expected to speak about George Floyd’s heart condition, which the defense has argued was a contributing factor in his death.Dr. Rich is an associate professor at Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University’s medical school. He attended Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and completed fellowships in cardiology and advanced heart failure and transplant at the University of Chicago Hospital’s Pritzker School of Medicine. Dr. Rich holds certifications in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease and advanced heart failure and transplant cardiology from the American Board of Internal Medicine.April 12, 2021, 10:43 a.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 10:43 a.m. ET Shaila DewanReporting from MinneapolisWe got an update on the timing of the trial: Closing arguments are expected to begin on Monday, a week from today.April 12, 2021, 10:41 a.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 10:41 a.m. ET Timothy ArangoReporting from MinneapolisEric Nelson, Derek Chauvin's lawyer, asked the court for two things related to Sunday's fatal police shooting near Minneapolis: full sequestration of the jury, and to re-interview each juror about what they know about the shooting and the protests that followed. Judge Cahill denied both motions. “This is a totally different case,” he said.April 12, 2021, 10:38 a.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 10:38 a.m. ETCredit...Court TV still image, via Associated PressThe defense attorney for Derek Chauvin asked the judge in the murder trial of the former officer to force Morries Lester Hall, an associate of George Floyd who was in a car with him moments before the police arrested Mr. Floyd, to testify.Mr. Hall’s lawyer told the court last week that his client is hoping to avoid testifying. Mr. Chauvin’s attorney, Eric J. Nelson, argued on Monday that Mr. Hall should be forced to speak about certain aspects of what he witnessed. The judge said he would rule on the motion at 1 p.m. Central time.At a hearing last week over whether Mr. Hall must testify, his lawyer said that testifying about any of his actions on May 25 had the potential to incriminate him, and that Mr. Hall planned to invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. Mr. Hall, who is currently in jail on charges unrelated to Mr. Floyd’s death, appeared in court by video conference, though he spoke only to spell his name and confirm that he had conferred with his lawyer. Mr. Hall’s lawyer, said that both prosecutors and Mr. Chauvin’s lawyer, Eric J. Nelson, had subpoenaed Mr. Hall, though Mr. Nelson seemed more interested in calling him to the stand. Mr. Nelson said in court that he wanted to ask Mr. Hall a range of questions, in
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Premiership Rugby is lining up midweek fixtures next month in an effort to welcome more crowds back into stadiums before the end of the season.The round 19 fixtures are slated for 14-16 May but, with the European finals taking place the weekend after and only Bath and Leicester still in with a chance of being involved, PRL is looking to delay some of those matches until the middle of the week beginning Monday 17 May, when crowds of up to 25% of stadium capacity would be allowed according the government’s road map.The opportunity has arisen, in part, because for only the second time since 2013 there will be no Premiership clubs in the European Champions Cup semi-finals, following defeats for Exeter and Sale by Leinster and La Rochelle respectively last weekend.Bath and Leicester have secured Challenge Cup semi-final spots but should both lose their matches it is possible all round-19 Premiership fixtures could be delayed, depending on logistics and any potential issues for clubs who share grounds. Some could potentially end up on the same weekend as the European final but it is understood the middle of the week is more likely for some clubs.Quick GuideFormer Scotland coach Massimo Cuttitta dies aged 54ShowFormer Scotland scrum coach Massimo Cuttitta has died aged 54.Cuttitta had been admitted to hospital in Rome with Covid-19, the Scottish Rugby Union said."Scottish Rugby is deeply saddened to hear the passing of our former Scotland scrum coach Massimo Cuttitta," the statement read. "Our thoughts are with his family and friends in rugby at this time."The Italian rugby federation confirmed his death on Sunday evening.Cuttitta played 70 times for Italy between 1990 and 2000 and captained the Azzurri on 22 occasions. He spent time playing for Harlequins and served as Scotland's scrum coach for six years from 2009. PA MediaPhotograph: Lynne Cameron/PAPRL introduced three rounds of midweek fixtures between August and October in order to complete last season in full but had opted not to do so this term on player welfare grounds. With all clubs facing huge financial hardship, however – Exeter were previously the only Premiership club to record a profit but have just announced a pre-tax loss of £2.26m – using the window to rearrange some fixtures for when crowds are expected to be permitted makes obvious sense.The last rugby union matches in England to feature supporters were in mid-December, when Northampton and Bath welcomed 2,000 fans for European fixtures. England’s extra-time Autumn Nations Cup final win over France at Twickenham on the previous weekend was also witnessed by 2,000 supporters before the government tightened restrictions in the lead-up to Christmas.The Breakdown: sign up and get our weekly rugby union email.Last week the Rugby Football Union was one of 10 of Britain’s leading sporting bodies to publicly back Covid passports – in a letter to senior government figures – as the safest way of ensuring capacity crowds as soon as possible after 21 June, when the roadmap states all restrictions could be lifted. The Premiership final is set to take place five days later at Twickenham and the RFU is currently planning for a c
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Teenager Anthony Neuer has got himself into the history books with an incredible 7-10 split, the first of it's kind caught on television for 30 years. The 18-year-old becomes the fourth player ever to achieve the feat during PBA Tour TV broadcast. Much to the astonishment of the commentators who spoke breathlessly saying 'Oh man, give me some oxygen and water ... I believe the Ginger Assassin can drop the 7-10'. However, it wasn't enough to send him to victory as he lost to Jakob Butturff, 257-203
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The head of the Anti-Defamation League has called for Fox News to fire Tucker Carlson, after the primetime host said immigration would “dilute the political power” of Americans.Carlson was referring to “white replacement”, a racist theory that has been cited as a motivation in deadly attacks.On Sunday, Jonathan Greenblatt, chief executive and national director of the ADL, told CNN Fox News should fire Carlson because of his “open-ended endorsement of white supremacist ideology”.“I think we’ve really crossed a new threshold when a major news network dismisses this or pretends like it isn’t important,” Greenblatt said. “Tucker has got to go.”Two days earlier, Greenblatt
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The British former prime minister has said that he did nothing illegal, but he has acknowledged mistakes in pleading Greensill Capital’s case with government ministers.Credit...Dan Kitwood/Getty ImagesApril 12, 2021, 9:55 a.m. ETLONDON — David Cameron, a former British prime minister, is to face a formal investigation into his business dealings after revelations that he lobbied former colleagues on behalf of an Anglo-Australian finance firm.Downing Street announced the review on Monday after weeks of publicity about claims that Mr. Cameron, who stepped down as prime minister in 2016, had approached cabinet ministers on behalf of the firm, Greensill Capital, which has now collapsed.Mr. Ca
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Ministers have paused a planned update to the NHS Covid-19 app after Apple and Google blocked it from their stores over privacy violations.The app, which aids contact tracing in England and Wales, uses technology built by the Silicon Valley companies to track interactions between users with their bluetooth signals and venue “check-ins”.It was to have been updated on 8 April, in time for lockdown easing and the introduction of free rapid coronavirus testing for everyone in England.So far, it has allowed people to check into indoor places such as bars and restaurants by scanning a QR code before they enter, but the data was kept on the individual’s phone.Should a venue be identified as a
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The Duke of Edinburgh would want family members “to get on with the job”, Prince William said, as he and his brother paid tribute to a “grandpa” and “an extraordinary man”.Prince Harry, who has flown from California to attend Saturday’s ceremonial royal funeral, described Philip as “master of the barbecue, legend of banter, and cheeky right ‘til the end”.He said his grandfather would be saying right now, beer in hand: “‘Oh do get on with it!’”The Duke of Cambridge shared a private photograph of his great-grandfather with Prince George, then aged two, riding in the box seat of a horse-drawn carriage. The photograph was taken by the Duchess of Cambridge in Norfolk i
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In the flood of tributes that followed the death of rapper DMX last week, his “Cradle 2 the Grave” co-star Gabrielle Union recalled on Instagram that the two bonded over “Golden Girls” reruns. But Union revealed just how deep the love went in an unearthed 2017 clip from “Hot Ones.” She told host Sean Evans: “Did you know that DMX loves the ‘Golden Girls’ and that’s a real fun fact!” (Watch the video below.) Union explained that he regularly watched the sitcom about four older women in his trailer while filming “Cradle” and that she sometimes joined him. “There was a dog-biting incident with one of the PAs who had been sent to go get him for set, so after a whil
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A relatively cheap, inhaled asthma drug helps older people struggling at home with Covid to recover three days faster, according to a landmark study.A trial in people over 65, and over 50 with underlying health conditions, found that inhaling budesonide twice a day for two weeks shortened their recovery time and helped them stay well and feel better than those who were not given the drug in subsequent weeks.The interim results from the Principle trial, which is looking for treatments that can be used in the community rather than hospital, could change clinical practice around the world, say the researchers. In many countries, fewer hospital beds are available for Covid patients, making it important to treat as many people at home as possible.Fewer people in the trial were admitted to hospital among those given the inhaled corticosteroid drug – 8.5% compared with 10.3% who had usual therapies – but that was at a time of falling hospital admissions so the effect is not clear, the scientists say. Their paper is published as a pre-print, which means it has not yet been through peer review.The study “has found evidence that a relatively cheap, widely available drug with very few side-effects helps people at higher risk of worse outcomes from Covid-19 recover quicker, stay better once they feel recovered, and improves their wellbeing,” said its joint chief investigator Chris Butler, a south Wales GP and professor of primary care at Oxford University.“We therefore anticipate that medical practitioners around the world caring for people with Covid-19 in the community may wish to consider this evidence when making treatment decisions, as it should help people with Covid-19 recover quicker.”Patients treated with inhaled budesonide were asked to inhale 800 micrograms twice a day for 14 days and were followed up for 28 days. The interim analysis found the median recovery time was three days faster for those on the drug, and that 32% of those taking it recovered within 14 days, remained well at 28 days and reported greater wellbeing. This compares with 22% in the usual care group.Butler’s counterpart, Prof Richard Hobbs, who heads the university’s Nuffield de
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As the first families began to filter in to Twycross zoo in Leicestershire on Monday morning, William clapped his hands with excitement.He is one of 15 chimpanzees at the 40-hectare (100-acre) zoo that have been longing for the return of visitors after months in lockdown.“They’re so excited that people are coming back. They haven’t seen many people that they haven’t recognised in a while,” said Karen Clarke, the zoo’s chief operating officer. “They love to play and pull funny faces, and they interact with the children as well and the children love it. The chimps almost copy them.”TimelineHow England's Covid lockdown is being liftedShow8 March 2021 Step 1, part 1In effect from 8 March, all pupils and college students returned fully. Care home residents can receive one regular, named visitor. 29 March 2021 Step 1, part 2In effect from 29 March, outdoor gatherings allowed of up to six people, or two households if this is larger, not just in parks but also gardens. Outdoor sport for children and adults allowed. The official stay at home order ends, but people will be encouraged to stay local. People will still be asked to work from home where possible, with no overseas travel allowed beyond the current small number of exceptions.12 April 2021 Step 2In effect from 12
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Group TextIn JoAnne Tompkins’s debut novel, “What Comes After,” a town reeling from unimaginable loss opens its doors to a pregnant stranger.April 12, 2021, 9:48 a.m. ETImageCredit...TBDWelcome to Group Text, a monthly column for readers and book clubs about the novels, memoirs and short-story collections that make you want to talk, ask questions and dwell in another world for a little bit longer.________ A pregnant teenager wanders out of the woods and into the lives of grieving neighbors. Will her circumstances bring them together or drive an even bigger wedge between two households with ample reason not to get along? Like a Choose Your Own Adventure book for adults, “What Comes After” provides multiple entry points for conversation about what path you might take if you woke up from a nightmare akin to the one Tompkins’s characters have survived.I was at my local bookstore when I ran into an acquaintance who started regaling me with stories of his open and honest relationship with his 15-year-old son. “I am super lucky,” he said, as I gagged behind my mask and slowly backed into the self-help/parenting section. “There are no secrets in our house.”For the better part of a year, I’ve been cooped up with three teenagers who constantly remind me how little I know — not just about their areas of expertise (politics, foreign affairs, public health, education, music, the environment, real estate and parenthood, to name a few), but also about some details of their lives. I am the mother of these teenagers and we share a not-very-big house, but their doors are frequently closed, in every sense of the word. I try to provide decent snacks and respect their privacy — to an extent. JoAnne Tompkins’s nail-biting wallop of a debut novel, WHAT COMES AFTER (Riverhead, 432 pp., $28), presents a nightmare scenario where adolescent secrets mushroom out of control, with devastating consequences. It’s a cautionary tale, one that prompted me to ask a series of probing, unwelcome questions at the dinner table. But it’s also a powerful and inspiring reminder of how a close-knit community will rally around people in trouble, no matter their age.The story
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Prince Harry remembered his “cheeky” grandfather in a moving statement on Monday, just minutes after his brother, Prince William, released a separate tribute of his own.  “My grandfather was a man of service, honour and great humour. He was authentically himself, with a seriously sharp wit, and could hold the attention of any room due to his charm — and also because you never knew what he might say next,” the Duke of Sussex said of Prince Philip in a statement shared with HuffPost.  “He will be remembered as the longest reigning consort to the Monarch, a decorated serviceman, a Prince and a Duke,” Harry continued. “But to me, like many of you who have lost a loved one or grandparent over the pain of this past year, he was my grandpa: master of the barbecue, legend of banter, and cheeky right ’til the end.” “He has been a rock for Her Majesty The Queen with unparalleled devotion, by her side for 73 years of marriage,” he added. “And while I could go on, I know that right now he would say to all of us, beer in hand, ‘Oh do get on with it!’” “So, on that note, Grandpa, thank you for your service, your dedication to Granny, and for always being yourself,” he concluded. “You will be sorely missed, but always remembered — by the nation and the world. Meghan, Archie, and I (as well as your future great-granddaughter) will always hold a special place for you in our hearts.” Harry signed off his statement with ‘Per Mare, Per Terram,’ which is the motto for the Royal Marines and means “By Sea, By Land.” Philip, a former Royal Navy officer, served as captain general for the Royal Marines for more than 64 years before handing over the position to Harry. The Duke of Sussex served in the Army for 10 years and saw two tours of Afghanistan. He was forced to give up his role as captain general of the Royal Marines, along with other honorary military appointments and royal patronages, in February after confirming that both he and Meghan would not be returning to royal duties following their step back. In a separate statement from Harry, William also shared sweet memories of the Duke of Edinburgh on Monday, alongsi
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“This Is a Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist” is the most popular show on Netflix, according to the streaming service’s public ranking system. The Netflix docuseries covers the 1990 theft of millions of dollars’ worth of art from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. The four-part project was apparently seven years in the making. In second and third place are two Netflix Original crime dramas: “Who Killed Sara?” about a man in search of his sister’s killer after he was framed for her murder and “The Serpent,” which tells the story of 1970s serial killer Charles Sobhraj.“This Is a Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist” on Netflix.Other Netflix originals in the top 10 include “Ginny & Georgia” and “Family Reunion,” which just got a new season
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9.13am EDT 09:13 Good morning, everyone. Welcome to the Guardian’s ongoing coverage of the Derek Chauvin trial. The witness testimony against Chauvin is scheduled to resume after 9 am CT this morning in Minneapolis. Chauvin’s trial is entering its 11th day of witness testimony. These proceedings are taking place against the backdrop of another Minneapolis-area police killing – which has heightened tensions in a community that’s already on edge about the Chauvin trial outcome. Police in the Minneapolis suburb of Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, fatally shot a 20-year-old man during a traffic stop Sunday afternoon. The death of 20-y
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Sports of The TimesDisplacements, human rights violations, health concerns and overspending have dogged the Games in recent years. The Olympic mission is a mess in need of long-term fixing.Credit...Hiroko Masuike/The New York TimesApril 12, 2021Updated 9:40 a.m. ETThe time has come to press pause and reimagine the Olympics. It might even be time, I’ve come to believe, for the entire endeavor to close down for good.What say you?First, consider the near term.In July, yet another wildly overbudget Summer Games, originally slated for 2020 but postponed because of the pandemic, will begin in Tokyo.The timing remains awful.Japan has worked hard to tamp down the coronavirus, but now cases are creeping up, and the nation’s vaccination rate is lagging. Organizers just rerouted the torch relay planned this week to reach the streets of Osaka, where one health official said the spread of new variants had pushed the medical system to “the verge of collapse.”Into this troubled environment, 11,000 athletes from all corners of the globe will descend, along with coaches, officials, Olympic support staff, media workers and more. The Tokyo Games could end up being a three-week superspreader e
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Prince William shared a statement mourning the loss of Prince Philip on Monday, days after Buckingham Palace announced that Queen Elizabeth’s husband had died at age 99. “I feel lucky to have not just had his example to guide me, but his enduring presence well into my own adult life – both through good times and the hardest days,” the Duke of Cambridge said in a statement on Monday.  “I will always be grateful that my wife had so many years to get to know my grandfather and for the kindness he showed her,” William continued. “I will never take for granted the special memories my children will always have of their great-grandpa coming to collect them in his carriage and seeing for themselves his infectious sense of adventure as well as his mischievous sense of humour!” — The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (@KensingtonRoyal) April 12, 2021 The royal family announced the Duke of Edinburgh died on Friday in a statement on behalf of the queen.  “It is with deep sorrow that Her Majesty The Queen has announced the death of her beloved husband, His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh,” said the statement, which was also shared on the family’s social media accounts. “His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle.” “The Royal Family join with people around the world in mourning his loss,” the announcement added. Calling all HuffPost superfans! Sign up for membership to become a founding member and help shape HuffPost's next chapter
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La Soufrière volcano has fired an enormous amount of ash and hot gas in the biggest explosive eruption since volcanic activity began on the eastern Caribbean island of St Vincent late last week, with officials worried about the lives of those who have refused to be evacuated.Experts called it a “huge explosion” that generated pyroclastic flows down the volcano’s south and south-west flanks in the early hours of Monday.“It’s destroying everything in its path,” Erouscilla Joseph, the director of the University of the West Indies’ Seismic Research Centre, said. “Anybody who has not heeded the evacuation needs to get out immediately.”There were no immediate reports of injuries or death, but government officials were scrambling to respond to the latest eruption, which was even bigger than the first eruption that occurred Friday morning.Approximately 16,000 people who live in communities close to the volcano had been evacuated under government orders on Thursday, but an unknown number have remained behind and refused to move.01:18St Vincent rocked by explosive eruptions of La Soufrière volcano – video reportRichard Robertson, with the Seismic Research Centre, told the local station NBC Radio that the volcano’s old and new dome had been destroyed and a new crater had been created. He said the pyroclastic flows would have razed everything in their way.“Anything that was there – man, animal, anything – they are gone,” he said. “And it’s a terrible t
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Hundreds of thousands of devotees bathed in the River Ganges on Monday despite soaring rates of new Covid-19 cases across India, a second wave that has struck down Bollywood stars, sent migrant workers fleeing from cities and contributed to the slowing of vaccination programmes around the world.The largest bathing day of the Hindu religious festival Kumbh Mela in the northern Indian city of Haridwar highlighted the immense challenge facing officials in trying to implement social distancing as the daily rate of new Covid-19 cases crossed 160,000 over the weekend, India’s highest point since t
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Mark Cavendish won the second stage of the Tour of Turkey, a 144.9km ride around Konya, to end a three-year dry spell on Monday.The Briton, back with Deceuninck-Quick Step six years after leaving the Belgian outfit, outsprinted Belgian Jasper Philipsen to raise his arms in celebration for the first time since winning the third stage of the Dubai Tour in February, 2018.The 35-year-old, who was pondering retirement last season, had joined Dimension Data in 2016 before spending a season at Bahrain-McLaren.Cavendish, who has won 30 stages on the Tour de France and is considered one of the best spr
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9.50am EDT 09:50 Adam Gabbatt After a year where Black Lives Matter demonstrations saw Americans begin to re-address and rethink racial inequality in the nation, a pushback from predominantly Republican lawmakers is on the horizon, with 29 states in the US moving to introduce draconian anti-protest laws. Florida is the most recent s
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We start at the Etihad Stadium as Leeds become the first promoted team in 13 years to win away at a team that sits top of the Premier League. What level of credit does Bielsa deserve for the performances we’ve seen by Leeds this year? We then move on to the battle for the Champions League as Manchester United, West Ham, Chelsea and Liverpool all win to further their chances. Could Leicester pay a heavy price after three of their key players missed the defeat at the London Stadium following a Covid-19 related breach? Finally, there’s time to discuss Newcastle’s important win, Phil Brown’s sabbatical, headbutts and whether ‘xG’ counts as a word in scrabble.
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“Thunder Force” is the most popular movie on Netflix, according to the streaming service’s public ranking system. The film is also the most popular offering on Netflix, regardless of format.Melissa McCarthy and Octavia Spencer star as estranged childhood best friends who come together to fight crimes after one develops a formula that can give regular people superpowers. Netflix’s “Thunder Force” premiered on April 9 and also features Jason Bateman, Bobby Cannavale, Melissa Leo and McCarthy’s husband, Ben Falcone. "Thunder Force" on Netflix. The second most popular film on the platform is the 1994 family classic “The Little Rascals,” proving that Alfalfa and Darla’s love story is truly timeless. In third is “Sniper: Ghost Shooter,” a 2016 direct-to-video action film
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Major the White House dog will receive further training away from the executive mansion after two biting incidents at his new home, a spokesman for the first lady, Jill Biden, said on Monday.The misbehaving canine will receive private training in the Washington area. It is expected to last a few weeks.“Major will undergo some additional training to help him adjust to life in the White House,” spokesman Michael LaRosa said.The younger of the Bidens’ two german shepherds, a rescue dog, did not break skin in the first incident, the president told ABC last month. Later in March the dog bit a security staff member causing a “minor injury”, a White House spokeswoman said.“Nipping is probably more accurate than biting,” LaRosa said on Monday.Following the first incident, amid intens
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Apologies make cynical history, but Boris Johnson has a big one to make, and fast. He must apologise to Northern Ireland’s unionists that he did not mean it last year when he pledged “no border” down the Irish Sea. As the Good Friday agreement negotiator, Jonathan Powell, wrote on Sunday, this was a lie. Johnson had just told the Irish government that the Good Friday deal held and there would be no border on the island of Ireland. Given Britain’s intention to leave the EU’s customs union, the two statements were incompatible, and Johnson knew it. Every truck on the Belfast ferry knows it, too.The current Belfast riots have invoked the usual platitudes. The Irish taoiseach, Micheál Martin, has called for calm. Joe Biden has offered concern. Everyone is outraged that children are
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The UK is edging towards a new deal with the EU on Brexit arrangements for Northern Ireland with the potential for easing border checks on certain goods.Officials in London and Brussels have been involved in intense “technical talks” in the past two weeks over the future checks on food, plants and parcels going from Great Britain to Northern Ireland.Downing Street’s official spokesman said the discussions had been constructive but that there were “still significant differences that need to be resolved”. The cabinet minister David Frost spoke by phone to the European commission vice-president Maroš Šefčovič on Friday.Sources said that while progress has been made on Northern Ireland, efforts did not involve removing checks on goods but instead were being concentrated on removi
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Credit...Kyle Johnson for The New York TimesApril 12, 2021, 9:09 a.m. ETMicrosoft said on Monday that it would buy Nuance Communications, a provider of artificial intelligence and speech-recognition software, for about $16 billion, as it pushes to expand its health care technology services.In buying Nuance, whose products include Dragon medical transcription software, Microsoft is hoping to bolster its offerings for the fast-growing field of medical computing. The two companies have already partnered on ways to automate the process of transcribing doctors’ conversations with patients and integrating that information into patients’ medical records.Nuance is also known for providing the speech recognition software behind Siri, Apple’s virtual assistant. In recent years, however, it has
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Now that we’ve all had more than a year of staring at nothing but the inside of our own homes, it’s becoming very apparent that we own far too much stuff. But, while a household clearout is a good idea in theory, it’s one that usually requires a bit of a run-up. If you’re struggling to get started, here are some expert tips.Why declutter?“You wake up in the morning, you tumble out of bed,” says Dilly Carter, professional declutterer and the star of BBC One’s Sort Your Life Out. “You try to find a towel, you try to find your toothbrush. You go to the wardrobe, you try to find a shirt that’s been ironed. You try to find a pair of trousers. Your socks are in the kitchen drawer. You stumble down the stairs, trip over some Lego, go to the kitchen, sniff the milk to see if it
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“Maybe try touching your clitoris faster with more pressure, or have you ever used a vibrator?” My college friend advised over a greasy, hungover lunch.  If she opened my bedside drawer to find my overflowing collection of sex toys, she would know that another vibrator was not my solution.  The outdoor Chicago seating was not our best choice for a hot Sunday in September. We downed pitchers of water while sweating out the tequila from the night before. My friend told me about the amazing orgasm she had with a random guy she met at a bar. That is usually how conversations with friends would go when talking about sex and masturbation. I’d hear about their intense orgasms by themselves or with partners, and then they’d offer me advice on how to reach climax. My sex life ― both pa
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This sci-fi-laced British thriller, from Czech director Martin Grof, aims for lofty metaphysical heights but trips over its own feet. Next to the films it draws from, it’s like a Tesco Value version of The Matrix, or as if Inception was taking place in the mind of a lobotomy patient. On a tiny budget, it’s no disgrace to fall short of these illustrious inspirations, but Sensation never recovers from the fact that Grof – co-writing with Magdalena Drahovska – seems unable to tidily convey its central premise.Looking to delve into his family history, postman Andrew (Game of Thrones’ Eugene Simon) has his DNA sequenced – but is told that he is part of an elite cohort of humans with hyper-acute sensory perception. Arm-twisted into joining a training group of similarly gifted individ
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The anti-immigration activist Tommy Robinson asked wealthy American backers to help him claim asylum in the US, the Guardian has learned, while his team approached the Republican senator Ted Cruz’s office about securing a visa.Court documents released in the US show the English Defence League founder discussed moving his family to Texas in 2019, where he would earn money by speaking at venues “including evangelical churches”.Such was the influence of Robinson’s supporters that they asked advisers to Cruz, the Republican former presidential candidate, for legal advice on securing an extended visa for “someone who needs protection”.Terry Giles, a prominent American businessman and friend of Cruz, told the Guardian he asked the senator’s office for assistance but did not disclos
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Voters, frustrated by astronomical rents and home prices, might be ready to force local governments to do something about the state of the housing market. Whether President Joe Biden feels the same is another question. According to a new poll by Vox and Data for Progress, a majority of likely voters say they’d support withholding federal money from cities and states that prevent more affordable types of housing from being built. More specifically, 54 percent back withholding infrastructure dollars from local governments unless they “stop making it illegal to build multifamily housing,” while just 32 percent wouldn’t. In other words, the idea is popular by a 22-point margin. That’s a big deal, because loca
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California TodayMonday: Ahead of a likely severe wildfire season, researchers suggest pollution from wildfires is more toxic than pollution from other sources.April 12, 2021, 8:59 a.m. ETImageCredit...Eric Thayer for The New York TimesGood morning.Last week, the state’s top legislative leaders unveiled a plan to spend more than half a billion dollars on efforts aimed at protecting the state from catastrophic wildfires.The plan builds on the governor’s proposal in January to spend $1 billion on wildfire prevention and resiliency efforts and includes money for things like vegetation thinning and home fixes meant to keep them from burning.“With California facing another extremely dry year, it is critical that we get a head start on reducing our fire risk,” the three leaders — Gov. G
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KINGSTOWN, St. Vincent (AP) — La Soufriere volcano fired an enormous amount of ash and hot gas early Monday in the biggest explosive eruption yet since volcanic activity began on the eastern Caribbean island of St. Vincent late last week, with officials worried about the lives of those who have refused to evacuate. Experts called it a “huge explosion” that generated pyroclastic flows down the volcano’s south and southwest flanks. “It’s destroying everything in its path,” Erouscilla Joseph, director of the University of the West Indies’ Seismic Research Center, told The Associated Press. “Anybody who would have not heeded the evacuation, they need to get out immediately.” There were no immediate reports of injuries or death, but government officials were scrambling to respond to the latest eruption, which was even bigger than the first eruption that occurred Friday morning. Roughly 16,000 people who live in communities close to the volcano had been evacuated under government orders on Thursday, but an unknown number have remained behind and refused to move. Richard Robertson, with the seismic research center, told local station NBC Radio that the volcano’s old and new dome have been destroyed and that a new crater has been created. He said that the pyroclastic flows would have razed everything in their way. “Anything that was there, man, animal, anything...they are gone,” he said. “And it’s a terrible thing to say it.” Joseph said the latest explosion is equivalent to the one that occurred in 1902 and killed some 1,600. The volcano last erupted in 1979. Ash from the ongoing explosions has fallen on Barbados and other nearby islands. C
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Credit...Amr Alfiky/The New York TimesFacing opposition over parts of his sweeping $2 trillion infrastructure proposal from Republicans and even some centrist Democrats, President Biden plans to meet on Monday with a bipartisan group of lawmakers, hoping to make progress toward a deal that can garner enough votes to pass a bitterly divided Congress.“The president will have an open mind and be interested to hear other ideas on every dimension of the package,” Pete Buttigieg, the transportation secretary, said on “Fox News Sunday.” “But as he said, doing nothing is not an option and we also can’t wait too long. He’s got an expectation of major progress in Congress by Memorial Day,” at the end of May.The meeting is an early test of which path Mr. Biden and his allies will ultimately take with the legislation: a bipartisan deal, which the president has said is his preference, or a broader bill pushed through over the objections of Republicans, which Democrats have not ruled out to achieve their priorities.The group of lawmakers will be made up of four Democrats (Senator Maria Cantwell of Washington, Senator Alex Padilla of California, Representative Donald M. Payne Jr. of New Jersey and Representative David E. Price of North Carolina) and four Republicans (Senator Deb Fischer of Nebraska, Senator Roger Wicker of Mississippi, Representative Garret Graves of Louisiana and Representative Don Young of Alaska).Mr. Biden’s proposal includes not just spending for highways, bridges and other physical facilities, but also huge new investments in areas that have not traditionally been seen as infrastructure, such as paid leave and child care. Republicans in both chamb
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On Thursday 8 April, Emmanuel Macron announced the closure of the prestigious École Nationale d’Administration, France’s elite school for turning out senior civil servants and politicians. The president’s announcement sounded familiar – he had already pledged to reform the ENA, a school renowned for its conservatism and aversion to change, back in 2019 – but this time it’s final: Macron said that the time had come to abolish an institution that is widely regarded as a symbol of elitism and inequality.With just a year until the next presidential election, Macron is neck and neck in the polls with Marine Le Pen. The ENA abolition looks, therefore, as if it’s part of a strategy to reconnect with “the people”. It’s easy to forget, given the pandemic, but before France entered lockdown in March 2020, it had been experiencing the most sustained anti-elite movement for generations in the form of the gilets jaunes (yellow vests) protests. Macron has certainly has not forgotten this.The president does not want to dispense with the idea of an elite school altogether but to build something that allegedly works better. A new school called the Institut du Service Public, a kind of “public management school”, will replace the ENA. Unsurprisingly, Jean-Louis Debré, once a close ally of Jacques Chirac, declared that this was a “populist” measure (by which he meant it was pandering to public opinion).His father, Michel Debré, the first of Charles de Gaulle’s prime ministers, founded the ENA in 1945. Its aim was to train students drawn from all walks of life through entrance exams so jobs in the French civil service could be assigned on merit rather than wealth and personal background. In reality, the school turned out to be a close-knit club for the upper-class, rather than a force for democratisation. The elitist recruitment pattern has worsened over the years: by 2014, 70% of students came from the upper classes, as opposed to 45% in the 1950s. ENA graduates – called énarques – land the best jobs in the civil service, but also in business and frontline politics. Alumni include several presidents, the past eight prime ministers and current
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As the weather gets hotter, public spaces open up and people prepare to make the most of the Covid lockdown easing, it is the fashion question that has sparked debate online – just how short should shorts be?Last week, the This is Us actor Milo Ventimiglia was photographed leaving the gym wearing a pair of tiny shorts and it reignited a debate about how much leg was appropriate to reveal.On TikTok, under the hashtag #5inchseam, users expressed their love for shorts that have an inseam measurement of 5.5in. The hashtag has 28.4m views, while Google searches for short shorts have surged.The baring of more male leg is not new: last year the actor Paul Mescal, of the BBC series Normal People, went viral after he was photographed in short shorts. And the singer Harry Styles was spotted in a tiny pair in Italy last summer.But after a year of working from home and only showing our top halves on Zoom conference calls, the reveal of our legs from beneath the darkness of our desks seems significant.It begs the question: post-vaccine, does part of the return to fashion’s Roaring 20s include a reveal of more flesh? Is it a case of “sky’s out, thighs out”?Thigh’s the limit for John Travolta. Photograph: AF archive/Alamy“Men are exposing their legs in public as a reaction to our
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8.54am EDT 08:54 The coronavirus pandemic has been a “death knell” for public transport, the former Top Gear presenter James May said on Monday. May told PA: Until coronavirus is completely banished, which seems to be some years off according to the experts, it’s a bit of a death knell for public transport, which is the thing that we were told would save our cities. He said that “the whole landscape of movement, transport and working practices will change quite a bit” as a result of the pandemic. May predicted people will walk, cycle and use electric scooters more often, but added: We are certainly not going to be able to do without cars for some time yet and especially not in rural areas. Youngsters can do without a car in cities for the most part, and I know a lot who do, but more out in the sticks, you don’t really have a great deal of choice for longer journeys. You are really going to have to have a car and you are going to have to be able to drive, so it actually needs to be encouraged. A man walks through a very quiet underground station during what would traditionally be a busy period for commuter travel, on 26 March, 2021 in London, England. A year after the first Covid-19 lockdown discouraged use of public transit, ridership on the London Underground, which recorded around 4 million rides every weekday pre-pandemic, was hovering around 20 percent of normal. Transport for London worries it will take two years before ridership - and hopefully the agency’s finances - returns to normal. Photograph: Leon Neal/Getty Images 8.45am EDT 08:45 City Hall on Monday said that the daily number of new people who tested pos
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A leading sight charity has stressed the need for inclusive web design after rail websites switched to black and white to mark Prince Philip’s death, leaving partially sighted people struggling.Network Rail and National Rail websites turned from colour to greyscale on Monday morning in a tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh. The gesture backfired after customers highlighted accessibility issues and complained they could no longer use the website.Other train operators, including Cross Country and Northern rail, had also removed the colour from their websites.One Twitter user said: “National Rail have coloured their entire website grey to ‘mourn Prince Phillip’, rendering the whole website completely useless to people with visual impairments. The UK has completely lost the plot.”Robin Spinks, innovation lead for the Royal National Institute of Blind People said: “As someone who is registered severely sight impaired, good colour contrast on a website is incredibly important. A lack of this makes it difficult for me to read the content and causes headaches and eye strain. It leaves me feeling unwelcome as a customer.“Although I can understand why an organisation might make a change to its website in circumstances such as this, any change should be inclusive and accessible so that all customers can continue to use the site as normal. ”Adherence to inclusive design standards should remain the most important aspect for all digital design, regardless of any changes made.”Mikey Stillwell, a designer at the research, design and user experience agency Verj, who is colourblind, said familiarity rather than accessibility, was the issue. He said: “In terms of [an] accessibility standpoint, I can’t really see too much of an issue because there’s loads of contrast on the website. But from a UX [user experience] there is. When you have grey call to actions, for example, they’re normally seen as disabled or inactive. There is a total loss of hierarchy for what is important on an website as well if everything’s the same colour.”Buckingham Palace announced that Prince Philip died on Friday morning aged 99. Many institutions across Britain marked their own
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As many Americans struggled during the COVID-19 pandemic, median pay for CEOs at more than 300 of the nation’s largest public companies zoomed to $13.7 million, up from $12.8 million a year earlier, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis. CEO compensation kept climbing, even in industries laid low by the pandemic and at companies where chief executives voluntarily gave up some of their salaries, according to the Journal, which analyzed data for S&P 500 companies via research firm MyLogIQ. The median CEO pay increase was nearly 15%, the analysis found, using figures reported by companie
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Matt Gaetz and a spokesman for Donald Trump reacted angrily late on Sunday after CNN reported that the scandal-hit Florida Republican congressman sought a meeting with the former US president when allegations of sex-trafficking and illegal drug use were first reported – and was rebuffed.CNN cited two anonymous sources who “said Gaetz tried to schedule a visit with Trump after it was first revealed that he was being investigated”. It said “the request was rejected by aides close to the former president”.The New York Times first reported federal investigations of Gaetz on 30 March. Sin
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Released when I was 14, Amy Winehouse’s debut album offered a bridge from the tween-pop I grew up on to an intriguing adult world rich with sophistication. Back then, I didn’t understand all the lyrics – who was “Badu”? What was a “Moschino bra”? – but that only added to the alluring sense that I was instantly cooler for listening. I spent many evenings in my bedroom trying to mimic Amy’s unfathomably syllable-packed rendition of Moody’s Mood for Love, or singing her ballads or fantastically cutting insults in the imagined direction of whoever was my romance of that week, depending on the drama.By the time Back to Black arrived, I was 16 and a fully fledged Amy fan, sporting backcombed hair and thick black eyeliner. The album soundtracked my first proper heartbreak, comforting me during the brushing-teeth-while-crying phase with Love Is a Losing Game. It later uplifted me as I sauntered down the street with my head held high to Tears Dry on Their Own, wondering why on earth I did, indeed, “stress the man”.I saw Amy play live just once, in Liverpool in June 2008. The Facebook photo album of the gig is titled “the best day of my life”, although I don’t remember leaving with the post-gig euphoria you get after seeing something soul-enriching. Of course it fell flat – she was very publicly struggling with addiction and an eating disorder. Her tiny shorts hung from her tiny legs. She looked like a shell of the Amy that was so full of life just a few years earlier. It was heartbreaking.Even more heartbreaking was the way I watched her being treated by the media and the spiteful comments by people I knew. To those who didn’t love her and didn’t understand mental health problems, she seemed a spoilt brat who was wasting her talent. One particularly abhorrent column in the Sun said she should be dragged “by her egg-yellow hair round a ward at Great Ormond Street hospital and [shown] the children fighting to stay alive. To hammer into her thick skull that she’s lucky enough to have a healthy body and mind that she’s wilfully choosing to destroy.” Wilfully choosing to destroy? Healthy body and mind? The lack of sympathy she received for ill health that is clearly not a matter of choice still brings a red hot rage into my chest.Amy Winehouse: You Know I’m No Good – videoI learned of her death via a text message from my sis
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Shares in Alibaba surged on Monday after the e-commerce company said that a record $2.8bn fine handed down by Chinese regulators marked the end of an investigation into anti-competitive practices at the company.Top executives at the company, founded by the billionaire Jack Ma, told investors that while Chinese regulators continued a wider investigation into the sprawling conglomerates in the country’s tech industry, they believed the multibillion dollar fine announced at the weekend marked the end of the focus on Alibaba. The company is listed in Hong Kong and its shares climbed as much as 9% on the management’s comments.“We are pleased we can put this matter behind us,” said Joe Tsai, the executive vice-chair of Alibaba Group. “With this penalty decision we’ve received good guidance on some of the specific issues under the anti-monopoly law. Other than the mergers review, we’re not aware of any other [antitrust] issues.”China’s market regulators imposed the fine on Alibaba, worth 4% of its domestic revenues in 2019, for restricting merchants that use its website from doing business or running promotions on rival e-commerce platforms. Alibaba said that it will spend “billions of dollars” to improve the experience of merchants on its site.While the $2.8bn (£2bn) fine is a record by Chinese regulators, it is also far less than the maximum 10% of revenues that Alibaba could have faced.The billionaire Jack Ma founded Alibaba. Photograph: Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty ImagesWhile Alibaba no longer faces any further investigations, it still has to comply with a “comprehensive rectification” programme as well as scrutiny of past mergers and acquisitions.Ali
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The reopening of England’s shops and restaurants brought that Christmas-morning flutter of anticipation, even though my plans this week are no more ambitious than poking round a charity shop or three. But as the high street reopens, the gaps will become as glaringly apparent as missing teeth. UK chains lost more than 17,500 outlets over 2020, some of which were far more than just a convenient place to buy towels and toasters. The outpouring of sadness at the closure of Cole Brothers in Sheffield was a reminder of the way these places mark some of our most memorable moments: first homes, special birthdays, school shoes and funeral suits.Independents have gone under, too: a yarn shop here, a cafe there, individual hopes and savings poured into businesses too fragile to survive a year’s disruption. But I surprised myself most at the grief I felt on hearing that the smallest outpost of the superlative Bettys tearoom empire would not reopen its cafe here in York, defeated by a combination of economics and logistics.Bettys is my Tiffany: the place where nothing bad can ever happen. Every branch is a peaceful haven of toasted pikelets, fine china and muted murmurs of delight at the arrival of laden tiered cake stands. But “the Kiosk”, as the real stalwarts called it, was special: a semi-secret, with wildly sloping floors and a warren of small rooms that made it feel like a Dickensian relic (actually it opened in 1965).I understand. A tightly packed queue on a narrow staircas
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A Covid-compliant member of the Bafta film crew. All photographs by Sarah Lee for the Guardian Each guest presenter arrived in an allocated time-slot, did some interviews and had a solo photograph taken. Here we see Asim Chaudhry being interviewed David Oyelowo has a temparature check before being allowed to enter the Royal Albert Hall The set design inside the venue Priyanka Chopra arrives with her husband, Nick Jonas
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London, UKJoe Foyster takes advantage of England’s new lockdown rules as he receives a free haircut while having a pint at a pop-up hairdressing station Photograph: Anthony Upton/PA Yangon, MyanmarWomen walk under a rainbow during the Buddhist New Year, known locally as Thingyan Photograph: AFP/Getty Images Lake Baringo, KenyaA Rothschild’s giraffe stranded by floods is transported from Longicharo island to the mainland Photograph: AP Idlib, SyriaChildren hold donated lamps ahead of Ramadan at the al-Iman refugee camp Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
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How about this for perfection by North Texas softball pitcher Hope Trautwein: 21 batters faced, 21 strikeouts.Trautwein threw the perfect game Sunday, striking out all 21 Arkansas-Pine Bluff batters she faced in a 3-0 victory.It was the first perfect game in North Texas history and is believed to be the first perfect seven-inning game in the history of NCAA Division I, the elite level of US college sports, with every out being a strikeout.NCAA records list two other pitchers with 21 strikeouts in a seven-inning game, but neither of those was a perfect game. Alabama’s Alexis Osorio had a 21-K game against Fordham in 2018, and California’s Michele Granger did it against Creighton in 1991.T
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And with that, Hideki Matsuyama is the first male Japanese player ever to win a golf major.Quite interesting timing, particularly as anti-Asian hate crimes in the US have risen 150% over the past year, spurred on by conspiracy theories – spread by those in power – about the origins of Covid-19. The hashtag ‘Stop Asian Hate’ surged more than 5,000% just this past month, according to Google Trends.What does Matsuyama’s win have to do with America? At first, I contemplated this and thought: “nothing”. He is from Japan, with absolutely no ties to North America – outside of his Oakley sponsor. Many Asian Americans may feel more of a kinship with Tiger Woods than with Matsuyama, bu
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“Show me the way to the next whisky bar …” English audiences watching from today might find the words of Alabama Song – the earworm number from Weill and Brecht’s Mahagonny, covered by everyone from Bette Midler to David Bowie – especially timely, but for nearly a century Weill and Brecht’s satires have rarely felt less than topical. In this double bill it is The Seven Deadly Sins that hits its mark most surely, staged by Isabelle Kettle as an up-to-date story of double standards. It is, in many ways, what we’ve been waiting for from the Royal Opera this last pandemic year: a production conceived for filming, harnessing the company’s young artists team and making imaginativ
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This year’s Met Gala will be in September. The Costume Institute has announced its next big show. The subject: American style. Politics are involved.Credit...Melanie Schiff, via S.R. STUDIO, L.A., CA.April 12, 2021, 8:00 a.m. ETAll those people who said American fashion was dead and that the pandemic, with its bankruptcies and store closures, was simply the tolling of the final bell? The people who pointed to the anemic state of the digital New York Fashion Week, with its lack of big names and buzz, and said it was over? The people who said it was going to be sweatpants and Crocs from now on?Andrew Bolton, the curator in charge of the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, an
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A simple poached piece of smoked fish, some charred but tender purple sprouting broccoli, green lentils cooked until al dente and an anchovy-rich cream dressing that brings the whole dish together. There are a few different steps here, but they are neither complicated nor long, and you will be rewarded with a sumptuous, nourishing feast that also makes brilliant leftovers for a working-from-home lunch. Tuck in.Poached smoked haddock with grilled purple sprouting broccoli, lentils and anchovy creamBe brave when charring the broccoli – it will provide deliciously bitter notes as a counterpoint to the smoky fish and rich anchovy cream.Prep 10 minCook 40 minServes 4250g puy lentils750ml chicke
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In the Guide’s weekly Solved! column, we look into a crucial pop-culture question you’ve been burning to know the answer to – and settle it, once and for allFor every person who wouldn’t touch a true-crime podcast with a blunt instrument, there are thousands of others lusting after more fake doctors and fast-talking waitresses brandishing one vital clue. Six years after Serial sparked an explosion in the genre, listening to an NPR-voiced reporter treading old ground while a piano tinkles in the background has now been officially recognised as a highbrow pursuit. The problem is where to draw the line: is this investigative journalism or is it exploitation of real people? The idea that
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