Herbaceous, smoky, vegetal, spicy, citrusy. Have a sip of Pedro’s, a Nigerian ogogoro, and you’ll smell and taste each of these flavors on your palate. If you try Aphro, a Ghanaian akpeteshie, you’ll taste pineapple and passion fruit. Vusa, a South African vodka, is smooth, creamy, and just a touch sweet. Africans have been making alcoholic beverages as far back as the historical record goes; palm-wine in West Africa, banana beer in the Great Lakes region, mead in Ethiopia, and maize beer in southern Africa. These are the flavors that Daniel Idowu, director of Value Africa, is bringing to the UK, along with something even more important—the stories behind these flavors. Africans have been making alcoholic beverages as far back as the historical record goes; palm-wine in West Africa, banana beer in the Great Lakes region, mead in Ethiopia, and maize beer in southern Africa. For Idowu, a British Nigerian, African spirits aren’t just about expanding cocktail culture—they're showing a new side of the African continent, one that connects large cities where distilleries are to the vast countryside where farmers harvest the plants that go into these spirits to the rest of the Western world where there is little to no knowledge of what African spirits even are. Idowu has been sourcing spirits from Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, and South Africa for the past 3-4 years. In 2020 alone, he spent over five months in Africa, visiting the entire supply chain to learn first how each spirit is made and what makes it special. He visited not only the distilleries in large cities but the farmers in the countryside who are growing and harvesting the palm tree. He heard from locals how they like to drink the spirit as part of their lifestyle. “I have the most fun in the field looking at where the raw ingredients come from and how the products are distilled,” Idowu says. “You’ve got 70-year-olds who climb trees to tap the palm tree. They have so much experience and energy.” In cities like Lagos, Nigeria, Idowu connects with
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It was 1999. On televisions everywhere in America, an exasperated woman appeared to be shaking years’ worth of dust from a fusty, worse-for-wear mop. In the background came a bubbly ’70s voice, intoning catchy lyrics: “This old mop makes me shake; that old vacuum makes me ache; this old rag draa-aaa-aaags me down.” And then, a green cardboard box filled the screen, as a smiling woman and her daughter uncased a newfangled cleaning tool. “This box rocks: The radical new Swiffer sweeper. So simple to assemble,” said the narrator. The commercial cut to a dance-y cleaning montage with an equally catchy song about the new tool. And the rest really was history. The Swiffer had arrived, and the cleaning world would never be the same. From Our Shop The roots of the Swiffer are contested,
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You can Grow Your Own Way. All spring and summer, we’re playing in the vegetable garden; join us for step-by-step guides, highly recommended tools, backyard tours, juicy-ripe recipes, and then some. Let’s get our hands dirty. “Badenjan Sesame” eggplant from Kandahar; black Hungarian' hot pepper from Kiskenfelegyhaza, Hungary; tomato from Isfahan, Iran—combing through the seed catalog on the Experimental Farm Network website is like getting a crash course in genetic seed diversity. Since its inception in 2013, EFN has been on a mission to preserve and expand biodiversity in crops. Nathan Kleinman and Dusty Hinzco, who first met via the Occupy Wall Street movement, co-founded the nonprofit cooperative to facilitate collaboration in plant breeding. For them, seeds aren’t just a way to put food on the table, they support displaced communities, promote food justice, and ensure a better future for all. Even the sale of these seeds for profit—one part of their endeavor—is mission driven: The company uses sales to support research as well as distribution and growing. "It’s essential to get them into the hands of the people and communities from which they came," says Kleinman. This is in sharp focus at a time when war, famine, and environmental destruction threatens so many communities, forcing immigration and loss of homeland. Kleinman’s own ancestors hailed from Odessa in Ukraine, and he has spent the last few months combing through about two dozen varieties of seeds from the country: sunflowers and calendula from Odessa and squash from Kryvyi Rih (where Volodymyr Zolensky is from). “We will use them to grow these crops and multiply as much as we can to preserve them for when the war is over. Rematriation of seeds is an important part of what we strive to do,” he says. Over a lengthy conversation with Kleinman over the phone, it became apparent that the work of the seed-growers of EFN is not just commendable, it’s critical. Here, a condensed version of all we spoke about, from the origins of their movement to how they’re building seed hubs across the country, and the sometimes-murky ethics of seed collection. From Our Shop Arati Menon: How did your work in seed preservation and collaboration begin? Nate Kleinman, the co-founder of the Experimental Farm Network. Nathan Kleinman: The genesis of the project was in 2013; I had been doing hurricane recovery work with Occupy Sandy for about a year, and was attending a talk by Eric Toensmeier about combating climate change while conserving soil and preserving ecosystems. Part of what he spoke of was the struggle around developing perennial global grains, which are far more environmentally friendly than annuals—we need to grow more perennials to trap carbon in the soil. The primary issue is that people have been working in silos, being proprietary with their seed. We figured if we developed a way to get people collaborating together in a broad-based, decentralized way, we might be able to drive innovation and get some of these perennial grains to a point where they’re available as viable options for farmers. It was really the experience of Occupy Sandy as a grassroots movement, which successfully mobilized thousands of volunteers very quickly for disaster relief, that made me think: What if we applied the same ethos and effort towards developing perennial agriculture? How have you gone about building seed hubs across the country? We knew early on that even if we identify climate change as an overriding issue of our times, there are also fundamental justice issues that impact how we eat and how we treat our environment and fellow human beings. We’ve worked with urban farms in Philadelphia doing what we could with historically oppressed communities. At the onset of the pandemic, we also developed a cooperative garden project, collecting seeds from companies and organizations and distributing them for free to anybody who requests them. The model from the beginning has been a decentralized one where we ask individuals and organizations to host local hubs in their community. All they have to tell us is who they serve, how they will serve them, and which seeds are important in their communities. Most organic small-scale seed companies have risen to the occasion, providing seeds. As of last year we have over 300 seed hubs. Where do you get your seeds from? We get a lot of our seeds from the U.S. Department of Agriculture seed collections, which, for a century and a half, have come from around the world. Few know that these seeds are actually available to anyone in this line of work; there are probably over a million varieties, and they are adding new things to it all the time. But much of the important work that the USDA does is dependent on adequate funding from the Congress, and that’s constantly in peril. Tell us about your work in cultural preservation. Something we identified early on is that most communities we were in touch with were seeking culturally important seeds. African-American communities were seeking okra and collards; Asian communities were looking for Asian greens, bitter melons, and long beans; Indigenous communities looking for indigenous seeds. So we began doing what we could to bridge the gap between prospective growers and seed companies. That realization helped to inspire one of our community organizers in Maryland to start a new farming alliance called UJAMAA. Originally a youth-led project aimed at supporting local black growers in South Maryland, the vision grew into a BIPOC-centered collective that intends to increase the availability of culturally meaningful seeds, with a strong focus on Black, Asian, and Indigenous crops. The idea being to provide opportunities and support for growers from historically oppressed and marginalized communities. You’ve mentioned rematriation efforts. Tell us more about it. My heritage is Eastern European Jewish, so I understand at a personal level what it’s like for a culture to be wiped off the map. I realized going through seed collections over the years, there were seeds from places that are hotbeds of violence and instability. One of the first I found were seeds collected in Kandahar in the mid-20th century. I’ve located seeds from Homs and Aleppo in Syria, a town in South Sudan… A major part of our mission is reproducing them and working to return to their communities. The process is called rematriation, because in most traditional cultures, women are the keepers of seeds. This is a long process that’s never that simple, but there’s so much need for it. There’s also a real need to continually get seeds from the wild,like native medicinal plants, because so many are at risk of loss from invasive plants and deforestation. How do you spread the good work? Ours is a collaborative industry: We trade seeds with one another and share notes, all working together to preserve biodiversity. We created EFN as an open source platform to facilitate that kind of collaboration and it’s still the foundation of what we do. At EFN anybody can host a project and sign up as a volunteer for a project. In a small garden at home you could be growing out seeds for a pathbreaking project, and it only involves some observation and patience and record-keeping. Some of our first volunteers are now growers who produce seeds that we sell in our catalog. We decided early on that we did not want to rely on grants and major donors, so we created a seed company to fund our work. It’s also a critical part of the work because it’s important to get them out there. There’s no point to
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If you speak French, oeufs-mayo holds no secrets for you: This portmanteau of an appetizer is no more complicated than uniting hard-boiled eggs and mayonnaise— the former halved, the latter dolloped generously on top.  “I always think of the traditional dish with the egg cut in half, from top to bottom, with the yolk on the plate and the mayo coating the white of the egg,” says author Dorie Greenspan. “But when I was at Le Paul Bert, it was upside down. I asked somebody why, and they said, ‘Because the yolk sticks to the plate!’”  Her evocation of the restaurant famed for its adherence to tradition is no accident: Indeed, though almost criminally simple, egg-mayo is a stalwart bistro staple, a dish Paris-based food writer and stylist Rebekah Peppler says she’s “seen eaten more out than in.” “Oeuf-mayo is a bistro dish,” agrees French culinary journalist Emmanuel Rubin, “not a home dish.” To wit, the iteration from Paris’ Bouillon Pigalle is France’s most-ordered dish on Deliveroo (a British online food delivery company)—and the fifth most-ordered dish in the world. From Our Shop According to Priscilla Martel, the former chef-owner of French Restaurant Du Village in Chester, Connecticut, oeufs-mayo often appears as part of a larger whole known as hors d’oeuvres variés, a hodgepodge of appetizers including grated carrot salad, celery root with remoulade sauce, or cubed beets in a light vinaigrette.“The one at the Colombe d’or will make you cry,” she says. “They wheel it over like a cheese cart.” But if the bags of shredded carrots sold at my local Monoprix are any indication, French home cooks are adept at making carottes râpées. Oeufs-mayo, meanwhile, despite its simplicity, seems relegated solely to bistros. In my fifteen years of living in France, I’ve been ensconced in several French families, but never once have I been served the stalwart combination of hard-boiled egg and mayonnaise. Greenspan posits that perhap
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Good food is worth a thousand words—sometimes more. In My Family Recipe, a writer shares the story of a single dish that's meaningful to them and their loved ones. It’s just a bowl of noodles. A stockpot, in my case, because I don’t have the basketball-sized Tupperware bowl my grandma uses, but it’s still just a bowl of noodles, coated with the most stereotypically American of ingredients—Miracle Whip, mayo, a little pickle relish. It’s a bowl of noodles, but now it’s something more. It’s my deliverance, my emancipation from heartbre
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Photo by Julia Gartland This story was written by Noëlle de Leeuw. “Food, I think, is my favorite thing,” Nora Ephron once said to Vogue’s food critic Jeffrey Steingarten, during an interview in her Upper East Side kitchen, “When I go somewhere, I have no desire whatsoever to see a famous Renaissance painting. I only want to go to the market and I only
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Whether you live somewhere warm and sunny year-round or are looking to make the most of your summer, I think we can all agree that a grill is one of the most (if not the most) prized outdoor essentials. Sure, you can try to re-create the deliciousness inside with a grill pan, but your veggies, chicken, and hot dogs just won’t have that same char factor. (Unless you want to trigger your smoke detector—trust me, I’ve been there.) While a grill is an undeniable must-have, finding the best one for your space, budget, and arsenal of recipes can be overwhelming. That’s why we tapped six grilling experts to share their favorites. As chefs, authors, pitmasters, and bloggers, these pros don’t look at grilling as just a fun pastime; it’s an art. Not only do they use their grills for just about everything (pizzas, steaks, veggies—you name it, they grill it), but they also know that the smallest features can set a grill apart from the rest. Go ahead, take a look at their go-to options. And once you’ve found the model that matches your needs, don’t forget to pick up some smokin’ grill accessories. Photo by Wayfair 1. Weber 22 in. Original Kettle Charcoal Grill, $149 $139 When Andrea Chesman wrote The Vegetarian Grill in 1998, she made it a point to test her recipes on both gas and charcoal grills. And while gas models are known for their convenience and ease, her Weber Kettle Grill is the one model she continues to use decades later. “The grill is now more than 20 years old and still looks new on the outside; I have had to replace the grill grate once,” she shares. “The Weber Kettle Grill has a large enough cooking surface to meet all my needs, and charcoal burns hot enough to give foods a good sear.” Photo by PK Grills 2. PK Grills PK300AF Grill & Smoker, 799.99 $749.99 Grilling isn’t a one-setting-suits-all situation. While some recipes will taste delicious with a quick, piping-hot char, other dishes will do best when exposed to low, slow heat. That’s exactly why Blood Bros. BBQ’s Quy Hoang is such a fan of PK Grills’ PK300AF Grill & Smo
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Tenth Helpings is a humor column from our culture critic, Ella Quittner. I am a Child of the ‘Corn. I was born in 1991 in Long Island—not on, never on—and so I spent much of my youth perusing the Lisa Frank section of our local Rite Aid. Once every few months, I was permitted to buy a pack of stickers, with which I would decorate everything from the plastic-sheathed diary I toted around but rarely wrote in, to the wall of my bedroom closet. The rainbow leopard was a choice sticker, funky and chic, and a little bit scary. The hot air balloon also had chops; it got to its point rather quickly, and had the added benefit of fitting nicely in between the curvy heart and the shooting star, thanks to its top-heavy design. And I wouldn’t have kicked the oversized butterfly out of a three-pack. But there was no Lisa Frank sticker more powerful, more omnipotent, more thick with the potential of what life was and what, ultimately, it could be, than the unicorn. The unicorn was the holiest body, the most transcendent form I had ever seen. Conceptually, to me, it represented immortality, and visually, it was all iridescence and bliss. Slap one of those little fuckers on a binder, and suddenly, it did not suck to do math homework. From Our Shop At some point in the last three decades, I lost touch with that magic. Or something. I must have! It’s the only way I can explain my gut reaction just a few weekends ago, when I discovered a product called “mini funfetti unicorn pancakes” at my local Gristedes, and I wished, in that moment, to be shot directly into the sun. The Great Unicorn-ing of Big Grocery probably peaked around 2018, when every conglomerate from Kellogg to General Mills had a rainbow-hued offering on shelves. Which is not to say that there’s been much of an ebb. Today, the following unicorn-flavored products are available within a several-mile radius from my apartment: a Betty Crocker Unicorn Cupcake Kit, Snack Pack’s Unicorn Magic Pudding, Little Debbie’s Unicorn Snack Cakes, Funfetti Unicorn Vanilla Frosting, Bang’s Energy Rainbow Unicorn Drink, Key Food Two Bite Unicorn Cupcakes, and the aforementioned mini pancakes, dispatched directly from Satan. And as I stared down at those tiny, tiny, pancakes, I realized that I couldn’t do anything about it. But I could try to understand it. Empathize with it. Become one with the trend. Maybe, just maybe, rediscover the magic. That night, in the bath, as I idly traced the outline of a psychedelic hot air balloon against the wet wall, I considered my path forward. It was clear. I would taste every single unicorn-flavored item I could get my hands on. I would eat those processed snacks until I bled pink and blue, until I burped confetti, until I was the ‘Corn and the ‘Corn was me. And then, perhaps, I could never think about it again. Here are my field notes: The flavor “unicorn” is never mea
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This article is part of an interview series called Ladies Who (Wear) Lunch, an exploration of the intersection of food and fashion. According to family legend, my first real word was appetizer (just ask my mom!), so it’s only fitting that food would follow me throughout my life. Folding napkins for my mom’s catering company in our family dining room as a kid evolved into part-time restaurant jobs in college, which led to a few failed food blog attempts, and eventually landed me in a graduate program founded by the original glamazon master chef herself, Julia Child, that then launched my career in food media. I don’t remember ever wanting a career in food, but looking back it seems this path was pretty inevitable. In a line of work without a real “uniform”—though I guess you could argue that blue light-filtering glasses are pretty necessary for those who stare at computers all day—I’ve curated my own work wardrobe and it involves lots of food, a food-iform, if you will. To name a few highlights: a shirt covered in Italian aperitivi, a strawberry patterned jumpsuit that I refer to exclusively as my “fruit suit,” and a pink gingham turtleneck covered in ants and strawberries. But the piece that kicked off my ever-growing collection of culinary adornments is a white beaded bag with beaded 3-D fruits attached to the front made by New York City-based brand Susan Alexandra. The woman behind this fruity glory is Susan Korn, a jewelry marker turned Bead Queen whose designs make me feel like a very fancy kid in the best way possible. What started as a small operation she ran out of her Chinatown apartment has exploded into a whimsical, bead-filled empire complete with a bedazzling flagship store where she regularly hosts dinner parties, pop-ups, and other community events. Korn staged a full-on Susan Alexandra musical produced for New York Fashion week featuring her incredibly talented group of friends, and her first fashion show was held in an actual bagel shop with all the models dressed as old school waitresses. Of course, there’s also the regular collaborations with direct-to-consumer food brands like Fishwife and Handsome Brook Farms, a colorful line of homewares, and so much more. I sat down with Susan to chat about how food inspires her, from the designs she creates to the meals she makes. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. Photo by Alistair Matthews MADISON TRAPKIN: ​​Can you describe your ideal lunch date? Where are you going, what are you eating, who's with you, and what are you wearing? SUSAN KORN: My ideal lunch date is sitting in a beautiful flower-filled field, and I think I'd be in the South of France. I'm wearing a really beautiful, flowy, comfortable dress, because I love anytime I can wear dresses. I'm thinking it's like 83°F, sunny, beautiful, lush, full of lavender and fig trees. The meal needs to reflect where we are, so we're going to be drinking a beautiful natural wine from a lo
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Photo by Castlery If you didn’t get a chance to shop the major Memorial Day sales last month, you’re in luck—the July 4th sales we’re seeing are even better. There are tons of great deals and discounts on furniture, bedding, and decor (some even up to 70 percent off), and many of them have already started ahead of the holiday. This means you can actually enjoy the long weekend instead of scrolling through endless s
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You can Grow Your Own Way. All spring and summer, we’re playing in the vegetable garden; join us for step-by-step guides, highly recommended tools, backyard tours, juicy-ripe recipes,
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We’ve teamed up with the audio innovators at Sonos to present Groove With The Seasons, a video series that showcases experts creating memorable hosting moments with the help of Sonos speakers. Unlike my mother, I simply was not born with the gift of a green thumb. For her, tending to our backyard garden and caring for countless house plants comes naturally; for me, keeping an unfussy philodendron alive is quite the accomplishment. Architectural designer and engineer Vionna Wai most certainly falls in the green-thumb category—her New York City apartment is an oasis of lush leaves and vines. And it’s no wonder: She’s also a pro
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Sure, you can probably find a peach at the grocery store year-round. But it’s probably not very good—it lacks flavor, is likely a little mealy, and certainly not juicy. Grab a sweet
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We’ve teamed up with the audio innovators at Sonos to dream up your next afternoon project: an easy-as-can-be herb planter. Head outdoors and take the Sonos Roam with you—this portable, waterproof speaker will be your sidekick as you DIY, plant, and prune your way through the summer. When you’re looking to add a little home-grown flavor to your cooking, herbs are the easiest way to spice things up. This summer, bring the outdoors inside with an easy-to-make planter box that will freshen up your space (and your meals). Planter boxes are ideal for folks who don’t have room for an expansive garden because they allow you to grow a lot of herbs in just a little space. In fact, even though I have several raised beds in my own garden, I always grow herbs just outside my kitchen window for ease of picking while I cook. For this DIY project, I’m turning a simple wire basket into a customizable planter and I’m making sure I’ve got the perfect soundtrack throughout the process (thanks to my portable, outdoor-friendly Sonos Roam, the perfect herb-to-table companion). Think: fragrant Mediterranean herbs suspended from your kitchen ceiling, edible flowers waving to you from the windowsill when it’s time for happy hour sips—this is small space, personalized planting at its finest because if you have a spot to hang it, you’ve got a place to grow a garden. So cue up your favorite playlist and get ready to make a simple yet stylish herb box that can be customized to move to the beat of your own gardening goals. Photo by MJ KROEGER. PROP STYLIST: MEGAN HEDGPETH. FOOD STYLIST: KATE BUCKENS. When selecting a basket for your creation, look for one that is at least 5 to 8 inches deep (this will allow room for roots to grow) and make sure to choose food-safe or stainless steel baskets to avoid toxic coatings leaching into your soil. Herbs are the perfect garden plant, whether you’re an experienced grower or a total newbie to planting. They’re quick-growing, easy to care for, and have the
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Photo by Knoll When my partner and I redesigned our kitchen a few years ago, we spent countless hours picking out a backsplash, choosing a new faucet, conceptualizing lighting designs, and combing through every single slab of marble out there to find one with the best veining. One decision, however, was quick and painless: picking seating. It seemed like every stylish kitchen we admired (read: dominated our Instagram feeds) had featured these particular cantilever chairs, and just like the rest of the world, we were hooked. Admittedly, we didn’t know much about the design’s history, so I dug deeper into the backstory of what’s become one of the most popular dining chairs of the 2020s. The story of the chair starts in Germany, at the famous Bauhaus design school. Miraculously, in just 14 years of operation, the Bauhaus produced a handful of interior design’s most enduring thought leaders. One such student was Marcel Breuer. The goal of his work, which aligned with the central teachings of h
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Photo by James Ransom “Do you want to carve or plate?” Matt asks me as we roll the service cart into the aisle. We set up the cart earlier the way we learned in TWA flight attendant training: We rolled silverware into white napkins and placed warmed dinner plates beside them on the second rack; the serving bowls of chateau potatoes and white asparagus sat next to the silver gravy boats of Bearnaise sauce; and in the center, the showpiece that a TWA first class dinner was famous for, a double chateaubriand. “Said to be created by Montmireil, personal chef to Viscomte Chateaubriand, the Great Writer and Statesman of the Napoleonic Era,” the menu boasted. Matt and I have been on either side of TWA first-class dinners since 1978. The only difference tonight is that we are serving this meal to friends in my loft in Providence, Rhode Island. And neither of us has worked for TWA since 1986 when a labor strike ended our careers. Since then, Matt has gone on to a career as a flight attendant with American Airlines and I have written over a dozen books. And now, 25 years later, we are reliving relive the Golden Age of Flying by recreating those long-ago dinners for our loved ones. We fall into our roles easily, as if no time has passed. From Our Shop I wanted to work a TWA first-class dinner one more time, an idea born while I wrote my memoir Fly Girl about my years 35,000 feet above sea level. “I’ll carve,” I say, and just like that, time vanishes. Instead of two middle-aged people dressed in black, me with my original name tag pinned to my dress, serving eight friends, we feel like two twenty-somethings again, in our snappy Ralph Lauren uniforms on a glamorous 747 flying somewhere over the Atlantic. Funny how a perfectly cooked chat
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It’s the season of strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, peaches, nectarines, and watermelons—oh, I could go on. All this is to say: It’s the season of dessert. In the interest of eating as much of this as possible, while spending as much time in the sun as possible, we’ve gathered our 35 easiest summer sweets, all 100% Genius–approved. Over the years, every recipe made our own Genius Kristen Miglore go, “Whoa!” for one reason or another. Think: lemon juice to thicken no-churn ice cream, or a one-ingredient chocolate mousse, or a deep-dish pie that comes together in 10 minutes. Whoa. How many of these can you make between now and September? 1. Atlantic Beach Pie This pie takes every shortcut in town and doesn’t apologize for it. Instead of making butter-based pastry from scratch, you turn to Saltines. And instead of making a stovetop custard, you combine sweetened condensed milk, lime juice, and egg yolks. And instead of making meringue, you whip cream. 2. Slab Pie If you don't have a pie pan but do have a sheet pan, you're in luck with this crispy-edged slab pie. Martha Stewart uses a foolproof, food-processor dough and fills it with anything from sour cherries to peaches. more genius...for your ears 3. No-Bake Nutella Cheesecake Oh, Nigella, you know us so well. Her cheesecake stars a buttery crumb crust with a Nutella–cream cheese filling and plenty of toasted hazelnuts on top. “Don’t be tempted to let the cheesecake come to room temperature before serving,” Nigella writes. “It slices and tastes better with a bit of fridge-chill on it.” 4. 10-Minute Lime Cracker Pie Like a Key lime pie, but it comes together in 10 minutes, and gets served out of a casserole dish (yippee!). You can thank Ritz crackers, which give this pie its creamy, cakey structure. Besides that, all you need are sweetened condensed milk, heavy cream, and lime juice and zest.
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Photo by Getty Images Have you ever known the acute panic that comes from calling your favorite takeout place only to learn the line has been disconnected? Faced with the prospect of never tasting the world’s best—that’s right, best—chicken shawarma ever again, you may slip into denial, as I did. Maybe you drive by the shuttered storefront a few times, desperate for signage indicating this is only temporary. Then you begin ordering shawarma after shawarma, hoping someone else miraculously makes it exactly the same—garlicky, redolent of lemon and warming turmeric
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Nickel & Dine is a budget column by Rebecca Firkser, food writer, recipe developer, and expert budgeter. This time, Rebecca is teaming up with our friends at Walmart to share tips for easy summer entertaining, featuring her signature flavor-packed, time-saving recipes plus a few of her must-have hosting items from Walmart—order ‘em online for pickup or delivery. I’d like to shake hands with whoever was the first to sell pre-made pizza dough. Though not particularly complex to make from scratch, DIY pizza dough is time-consuming (mostly due to rising and resting) and sometimes, there simply aren’t enough hours in the day. And even when I do technically have the time I don’t always want to wait—there are far too many tasty treats to be
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Photo by Ty Mecham Here are our top 5 dishes disguised as sandwiches! In our latest recipe contest, we asked our community members to share their best dishes disguised as a sandwich. The entries were playful and creative. It was a tough process—not really, we love sandwiches—but we narrowed the field down to five recipes you're going to want to try at your next lunch. 1. Biftec Encebollado Sandwich with Mayo-ketchup Sauce by Juan Carlos Ponce This sandwich combines sweet and savory with just the right about of textural crunch to make a successful meal disguised as a sandwich. The mayo-ketchup mixture works well with the sweet plantains and the onions and steak were a flavorful base for the sandwich. 2. Spicy Smoked Salmon "Bento" Bagel Sandwich with Cucumber Salad by Joni Goldbach It may seem like there are a lot of moving parts for a simple san
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A couple years ago, outdoor spaces were largely a “nice to have” on home wishlists. Sure, it would be lovely to clink glasses on a balcony, or spill out onto the patio on a summer night, but other features often won out. Most of us have come to realize that an outdoor space—particularly one that’s attached to your house—can be hugely impactful on mental health, our ability to socialize, and creating a home base that really ticks all the most important boxes. It’s no wonder, then, that landscape and outdoor design firms have been inundated with projects, transforming once-neglected yards into oases for relaxing, gathering with loved ones, and simply living in—much like we do inside our homes. While chatting about this idea of creating outdoor living spaces with Kevin Lenhart, ​​landscape architect and design director at Yardzen, he mentioned that “social front yards,” were an emerging trend among their clients—and I was intrigued. So, What is a Social Front Yard? The name sort of speaks for itself here, as it’s a front yard intended not just for ornamentation and showing off the greenest grass in the neighborhood, but also making it clear from the sidewalk that you’re not closed off to friendly conversation. Most backyards in the U.S. serve the purpose of a private gathering space, while our front yards remain pretty strictly decorative, but the pandemic opened up the idea of expanding outdoor living spaces into the front yard, too. “People were getting cabin fever in their houses during quarantine,” Lenhart says, and “this put a lot of pressure on
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You bought too many eggplants. Or, you have an extra one that you have no idea what to do with. Or, your family always makes the same dish and you want to switch it up. That’s where these 35 recipes come in handy. From yogurt-y dips (hello, Saturday picnic) to chocolate cake (yes, seriously), these are some of our favorite ways to use one of summer’s favorite vegetables fruits. From Our Shop 1. Mapo Eggplant There are layers upon layers of savory, spicy flavor in this tofu-eggplant hybrid dish, inspired by Sichuan mapo tofu. Both elements get stir-fried in a wok, then simmered with peppercorns, chili powder, doubanjiang, soy sauce, wine, dark soy sauce, and sugar. 2. Eggplant & Shishito Phyllo Pie “Layers of thin, flaky phyllo hold a filling of tender charred eggplant, blistered shishitos, and fragrant chard,” writes recipe developer Pierce Abernathy. This savory vegetarian pie is a summer stunner that’s perfect for feeding a crowd. 3. Burnt Eggplant & Tomato Tahini Rather than using up the remains of a jar of tomato sauce for pasta, whip up this delicious dip that meshes roasted eggplant, tahini, and homemade (or store-bought
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Photo by MJ Kroeger. Prop Stylist: Sophia Pappas. Food Stylist: Kate Buckens. We’ve teamed up with our friends at Line 39 for a guide to stress-free entertaining any night of the week—just add wine. All of their wines are crafted in California with care, from bright, lightly earthy Pinot Noir to Rosé that’s bursting with strawberry flavor, and beyond.
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No Space Too Small is a column by Laura Fenton that celebrates the idea that you can live well in a small home. Each month, Laura will share her practical findings from years of observing how people live in tight spaces, and her own everyday experiences of living small—from the hunt for the perfect tiny desk to how to manage everyday clutter. I’ve lived in eight different apartments since I arrived in New York City more than twenty years ago, and they’ve all been variations of small, tiny, miniscule, or petite. In one studio, my bedroom, livin
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Photo by Rocky Luten I like my apartment, but the longer I spend in it, the more I notice its middling little flaws. I’m not about to tear the place down to the studs (I doubt my security deposit would cover that, anyway), but I’m always in search of easy ideas that don’t require a year-long renovation or all my money to complete.
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One of my favorite ways to celebrate the Fourth of July is with a killer dessert table. When I was younger, I'd always make a beeline for the blueberry pie my mom would pick up from our favorite bakery in Florida, which was topped with at least two scoops of vanilla ice cream. Today, I'm still a blueberry pie fanatic, but I've also added a handful of other sweet and simple treats (think: tarts, icebox cakes, no-churn ice creams, and cookies) to my repertoire so that I can satisfy any craving. From a super-colorful tart starring the season's best fruits to chocolate-dipped mint ice cream sandwiches you can make days ahead of time, here are 23 easy dessert recipes to keep bookmarked for the Fourth of July holiday. 1. Fre
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Welcome to Best of the Test, a thoroughly tested, expertly vetted, only semi-serious product recommendation series. Join us as we sleep with a dozen different bed sheets, make gallons of ice, air fry all the wings, and more in pursuit of the very best things to buy. I am the type of person who reaches for an ice-cold drink even in the middle of winter. No seriously, no matter the weather, I’ve always got something cold in my hands—water, coffee, sweet tea, matcha. Now that temps are rising and outdoor entertaining is hitting its peak, having a full stash of ice ready to chill several drinks at once is more of a must-have than a nice-to-have. Just one problem…okay, two: 1) My refrigerator doesn’t have a built-in ice maker, a
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Juneteenth (June Nineteenth) marks the date in 1865 when the news of emancipation finally reached Galveston, Texas. On this day, over two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, nearly 250,000 enslaved people were freed.  Although America’s history has and continues to be blemished with senseless acts of violence, brutality, and inequality toward the Black community, today, Juneteenth serves as a national day of remembrance and honor. And in a historic moment, on June 16th, 2021 the United States Senate unanimously passed a bill to make Juneteenth a federal holiday.  Through joyful celebrations and soulful traditions, Juneteenth allows us to make space to pay homage to our ancestors by acknowledging their struggles and perseverance. And at the
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Photo by Julia Gartland There’s something soothing about following directions for baked goods, knowing that the final product will turn out just right if you abide by the precise measurements. I love to bake everything from elaborate birthday cakes to buttery biscuits to fudgy brownies, but sometimes I get a little lazy when it comes to using the appropriate ingredients (who doesn’t?). For example, when I see that a recipe calls for cake flour instead of all-purpose flour, I tend to turn my cheek and proceed with all-purpose, not wanting to make a last-minute run to t
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When it comes to quick ways to completely make over a room—with no remodeling involved—wallpaper easily rises to the top of my list. It’s a transformation you can accomplish in a weekend, and oftentimes, it doesn’t even require professional installation. With the range of colors and patterns out there, it’s a great way to bring dimension, layers, and interest to a space. While the earliest wallpapers (or painted decorative papers) date back to China, not too long after paper itself was invented, its extension, wallpaper borders, are relatively more recent, originating in the 1700s. If you’re unfamiliar with the use of wallpaper borders, they’re essentially thin strips of wallpaper meant to be used as accents instead of complete wall applications.
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Photo by James Ransom We’ve teamed up with Walmart to help you pamper your pooch. Order online or via their app to shop your go-to pet supplies, groceries, and other household items, then select delivery or in-store pickup for a seamless shopping experience. Not too long ago, my boyfriend and I brought home the best—and most time-consuming—addition to our apartment: a spunky, cuddly French bulldog named Oswald. Nicknamed Ozzie, this little pup with the biggest personality is both hilariously stubborn and eager-to-please, and in turn, we
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Photo by Julia Gartland Back in March when Food52 released a one-off vintage Dansk drop, some of the most coveted items were the pitchers in cool teal, chili red, and even a rare kumquat. There were only five total, which means they sold out in a snap. But there’s good news for all those of you that didn’t get your hands on one. An archival reissue of the iconic pitcher is now available—and there are plenty to go around! The Købenstyle pitcher, which was first unveiled in 1955, is often one of the first vintage Da
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Photo by Julia Gartland As the temperature rises, our collective palate starts to shift towards light and refreshing kinds of beverages. Enter: soju, the beloved national liquor of choice in Korea that should be on your radar. For a long time—at least in the U.S.—soju was primarily associated with Korean barbecue joints and Korean restaurants in general. But it’s now popping up in liquor stores across the country, with a selection of brands and flavors. This fragrant and crisp liquor is easy to drink, yet will still surely give you a buzz. And now, lik
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Photo by Julia Gartland Dinner just got a lot more expensive: the Consumer Price Index (CPI) showed that supermarket and grocery store prices went up by almost 11 percent between April 2021 and this year, with predictions slating it to rise further (it rose by 1.3 percent between March and April alone). Surprisingly, food for home consumption grew even faster than restaurant prices. While the CPI doesn’t have a specific measure of the prices at farmers’ markets around the country, many vendors feel the squeeze of gas prices and ingredients acutely.
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Coffee stains are a fact of life if you weren’t born with the balance of a gymnast. Since I drink coffee almost every day and have no sense of balance to speak of, the number of times I’ve spilled coffee on myself, or something in my immediate environment, numbers in the thousands, if not more. And since these coffee stains usually happen to me in the wild—on the train, in the middle of a restaurant meal, or en route to run errands—I usually don’t have the option of tossing something in the washing machine until the end of my day. Not to mention, if stain removal were just a matter of doing a load of laundr
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Photo by Julia Gartland We’ve teamed up with Walmart to transform your summer gatherings, one affordable dinner at a time. Order online or via their app to shop your go-to groceries, reusable tableware, and other household items, then select delivery or in-store pickup for a seamless shopping experience. I’ll be honest: grocery shopping is not my favorite activity. I enjoy cooking and picking out what I’ll eat for the week, but the act of going to the store (and lugging all the food home) is one I put off quite frequently. When I’m no
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Photo by James Ransom Pizza has always been one of my major food groups. My dad would treat me to post-game pies to get through hours on the soccer field as a teen, and years later, I would take myself out to get over a hangover with dollar slice combos too often to count when I lived in Manhattan. I'll travel far and wide for a good slice, but lately, one of my favorite places to get pizza is somewhere I don’t have to travel to at all: home. My life changed when my dad got a pizza oven recently. Now, I don't think I'v
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