The other day, I was on the treadmill, distracting myself with one of my favorite home decor podcasts”), and my attention latched on to something the hosts were chatting about: design crimes, specifically the ones they’d like gone in the new year. High on the list of offenders were karate-chopped pillows, overly styled coffee tables (ya know, the kind with no space to put down your drink), and matchy-matchy decor. I chuckled at most of them, but it did get me thinking: What “design crimes” am I guilty of in my own home? And is it an offense if it works for me? At the start of each year, design trends are on the minds of a lot of people. Which ones are we happy to turn our backs to? Which new ones will capture our imaginations (and wallets)? As a home editor, I’m obviously very invested, but I’m also firmly on Team Do-What-Makes-You-Happy. Trends expand our creative possibilities and rules give us a framework for action—to determine the height of your pendant light, for instance—but there’s nothing wrong with letting a trend (or many) bypass you completely, or taking a rule and stretching its boundaries. In fact, being constantly worried about making a mistake is often why so many of us don’t end up finishing up a space. So while every rule book tells you to hang your artwork at eye level, perhaps your ceiling is so high that doing so just makes your art look comical. And maybe having a TV over your fireplace is the only logical way to configure your living room. And pssst: dark colors can totally work in many small rooms. To celebrate this sentiment, I decided to make my own list of rules that I break—and asked my Home52 colleagues if they had any to add. So here they are. And here’s to the rule breakers among us. Separate warm and cool colors I’ve never been a stickler for an overly cohesive color palette, and I believe that combining warm and cool colors in a room actually keeps things interesting. My couch is grey (cool), and my throw pillows are in shades of olive, cream, brown, and rust (warm). My area rug is a c
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Headed to a party? Set up a pile of Linzer cookies (cut into hearts, of course), bursting with raspberry jam. A batch or two of millennial pink strawberry shortbread are also sure to please a crowd. But maybe you’re spending the night in with a face mask and a good bowl of pasta. You definitely need this single-serving chocolate and peanut butter number to finish off the evening. If you do have a date, bring out one big cookie after dinner—you can dive right into it with your hands. Who knows where the night will go from there? We do, however, know that any of these cookies will make your Valentine’s Day extra sweet. 1. Linzer Cookies A classic Linzer needs little introduction—cut them heart-shaped and fill with raspberry jam for extreme Valentine’s Day vibes, but apricot, peach, or plum jam would be equally tasty.
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Spring ushers in the best weather and the best spring veggies—asparagus, green beans, tender fresh herbs, rhubarb, ramps, cabbage, spring onions, baby spinach, and peas. As soon as I turn the page on our calendar to March (raise your hand if you still use a paper wall calendar), I can’t help but get excited about all of the sweet and savory springtime dishes to come. To kick off many weeks of 50-degree weather and finally getting to dry-clean your parka (that is, for our friends up north), these quick and easy spring dinner ideas will perk up your meal any night of the week. 1. Spring Weeknight Pasta Sing the praises of spring with this family-friendly pasta recipe jam-packed with seasonal specialties like radishes, asparagus, and peas. Recipe developer Eric Kim likes to add bacon for a salty, savory edge but you can leave it out for a vegetarian dinner. 2. One-Pan Chicken With Asparagus, Almonds & Miso Butter A weeknight spring dinner should be quick, effortless, and delicious. One-pan meals like this, which call for a pound or two of fresh asparagus, save the day. 3. Nigel Slater’s Minty Pea Soup with Parmesan Toasts This lighter dinner recipe doesn’t skimp on flavor, thanks to the abundance of in-season produce like fresh peas, lettuce, and mint. It’s the epitome of spring and the best part is, you can make it in advance, which saves time on busy weeknights. 4. Cheesy Spinach & Artichoke Frittata With Arugula I will never say no to breakfast for dinner, especially in a family-friendly format like a frittata. You can throw anything and everything into this big-batch egg dish, but take advantage of all of the spring produce available at every turn. 5. Pasta With Marinated Artichoke Sauce This three-ingredient recipe calls for jarred, marinated artichoke hearts, which gives you peak spring flavor anytime of the year. 6. Ramp Carbonara It’s ramp season, baby! Blink and you’ll miss them, so stock up while you can and turn them into pesto, pasta, or pesto pasta! 7. Sheet Pan Roast Chicken and Cabbage “A sheet pan supper suggests a lot: dinner on a single pan, vegetables cooked with proteins, side dishes with entrées, a complete meal requiring minimal fuss and clean-up. It’s the convenience of a crock pot in a fraction of the time,” writes recipe developer Alexandra Stafford. Fortunately, she’s mastered the art of a sheet-pan supper for early spring. Get all the warm and cozy feels from bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs with a nod to the upcoming season with roasted cabbage. 8. Vegan Lemon Asparagus Risotto Normally, it takes a lot of butter, a lot of chicken stock, and a lot of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese to make a risotto. But this one relies on robust vegetable stock and nutritional yeast to achieve the ultra-creamy texture. Plenty of fresh lemon zest and blanched asparagus bring this traditionally cozy winter dish into spring. 9. Martha Rose Shulman’s Quick-Braised Fish With Baby Potatoes & Greens You can find baby potatoes year-round but they’re really at their best during spring. Ditto for delicate herbs, asparagus, and green beans. Put them altogether for a complete spring dinner that is equal parts nourishing and delicious. 10. Lemony Halloumi With Snap Peas & Pea Sprouts “Welcome the season of leisurely brunches, rosé-filled picnics, and green vegetables galore with this vibrant salad that almost shouts, “Hello, spring!” This is the time of year when simplicity reins supreme,” writes recipe developer Asha Loupy. 11. Cashew Milk–Braised Cabbage With Crunchy Chile Oil Cabbage peaks around the curtain come St. Patrick’s Day, as if to say “Hi! I’m here! Remember me?” But for vegetarians who want the comfort of corned beef and cabbage without the meat, there’s this utterly flavorful, super charred preparation of braised cabbage for dinner. 12. Pesto Pasta With Green Beans & Potatoes The key to a bowl of pasta that makes you want to cry tears of joy is relying on simple flavors and in-season produce. For spring, that means a classic basil pesto tossed with the season’s shining stars: baby potatoes and green beans. 13. Creamy Watercress, Pea & Mint Soup Watercress deserves to be so much more than the garnish we’ve come to rely on. Here, it finally gets its chance to headline in this quick green soup for spring. 14. Scallops & Peas With Mint Gremolata “Sweet, buttery, and luxe, yet not terribly expensive, [scallops] can be prepared in a variety of delicious ways, and—most of all— are incredibly quick to cook. Though they are great any time of year, I love this fresh, springtime preparation, which balances a trio of vibrant green vegetables with a simple gremolata made with lots of fresh mint,” writes Gail Simmons. Hey Gail, can you cook dinner for me every night? 15. Miso-Garlic Snap Pea Salad With Pecorino & Mint If this crispy, crunchy green salad doesn’t get you excited for spring, I don’t know what will. 16. Green Pasta Primavera The Italian-American pasta primavera gets a seasonal springtime spin with scallions, leeks, broccoli, green beans, and lots and lots of lemon. 17. Creamed Peas With Scallions & Little Gem Chiffonade I know I’ve waxed on about one-pot dinners and main courses for spring, but what about the sides to accompany something simple and satisfying like roast chicken or baked salmon? I got you. This French-inspired preparation makes use of fresh garden peas, Little Gem lettuce leaves, and scallions. 18. Roasted Shrimp & Asparagus Scampi Shrimp scampi is as classic as a little black dress or Frank Sinatra on vinyl. But there’s always room for improvement, right? Right. To eliminate some stovetop mess, we roasted the shrimp (rather than sautéing it in a lot of butter and olive oil. Oh, and we added asparagus because it’s spring and why not? 19. Cabbage Bake Come spring, cabbage is often overlooked compared to its vibrant seasonal neighbors like ramps and rhubarb. But give it a second look: Slice up a few cups of cabbage, toss it with South Indian and north African spices, and you’ll never pass it up again. 20. Radicchio & Pickled Radish Salad Spring radishes are paired with hearty winter radicchio for a year-round side salad. 21. Mushroom Stroganoff Depending on where you live in the country, it’s possible that there will still be snow on the ground. If you’re a few weeks away from blooming tulips and jean jacket-wearing days, make this cozy stroganoff that replaces the usual chewy beef for mixed mushrooms. 22. Chicken Florentine by Joanna Gaines Four cups of spinach are used for this creamy chicken recipe, courtesy of Joanna Gaines. 23. Pasta With Green Pea Sauce & Lots of Pecori
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Photo by Ty Mecham. Prop Stylist: Alya Hameedi. Food Stylist: Adrienne Anderson. We’ve teamed up with Manitoba Harvest—known for its commitment to high-quality hemp foods—to showcase a protein powerhouse: their hemp hearts. Manitoba Harvest’s hemp hearts are loaded with protein and omegas, and are free from preservatives, fillers, and artificial ingredients. Bonus: They’re grown without herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides, and have almost unlimited recipe applications. Meet the small-but-mighty shelled seeds we’re putting in and on everything, from smoothies to salads: hemp hearts. These soft, chewy seeds are a good source of protein, rich in ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) omega-3 fatty acids, and they’re a great way to add nuttiness and texture to any dish (especially when it comes to breakfast). Beyond morning meals, you can use them in just about anything—even to top something like this garlicky vegan flatbread—which we think makes them a must-have pantry staple. So, What Exactly Are Hemp Hearts? Technically in the nut family, hemp hearts are the shelled or hulled interiors of seeds cultivated from the hemp plant. A common misconception about hemp hearts, and hemp products in general, is that they can get you high. But while both hemp and cannabis come from the same plant species (Cannabis sativa), hemp seed foods don’t have any psychoactive effect on the body. As Manitoba Harvest explains on their site, "It’s like comparing mint and basil—they’re both herbs, but they’re used in very different ways for very different results." To separate the crunchy edible shells from the delicate interiors, hemp hearts undergo a dehulling process to expose the tiny centers. Mild and slightly nutty in flavor, hemp hearts pair well with just about everything, from baked goods to plant-based burgers.
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Photo by Saatva For the longest time, I’d never given much thought to my mattress. I’m not a bad sleeper by any means—once the lights go out once I put my phone down, I’m out like a baby and if I didn’t have a job to set my alarm for, I’d sleep until noon (or later). Fun fact: I once slept standing up in the middle of a casin
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Welcome to Freddie Bitsoie’s pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring seven staples stocking Freddie’s Indigenous American kitchen. I began experimenting in the kitchen when I was a kid. Maybe it was the PBS cooking shows that I loved, or maybe it was boredom that drew me, but I began to cook in secret when my family wasn’t looking. I started out with hamburger patties, working through trial and error—like a culinary detective—
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“Have you planted your garden yet?” is a question I frequently get in the spring. It always puzzles me, because to supply you and your family with fresh produce all season long, planting a garden is not a one-time thing, it’s an ongoing activity. For example, to be able to harvest your own lettuce from spring through fall, you need to seed a small amount at regular intervals—about every two to four weeks. Even in ideal weather conditions and with the best possible care, garden crops can fail. The more you diversify what you plant, and the more you spread it out over the gardening season, the better. It’s similar to smart investing, where a diversified portfolio is less likely to turn you bankrupt. Diversifying your garden is especially important if you are one of the many people who first started gardening during the pandemic, perhaps frustrated (and discouraged) by the failures. Weathered, battled-tested gardening veterans take crop failures in stride and diversify what they grow. Successful gardening is built on failures. But with the failures also come successes, and your garden will thank you for putting effort in year-round. Here’s a four-pronged approach that can help you make your gardening season more successful: If you didn’t keep gardening records last year, jot down what you can still remember, such as what you planted, where, and any problems or successes. This information will be helpful as a reference for this year and for also for all future gardening years. In your garden diary, recap which crops did well last year and which didn’t, and why. Sometimes failures are obvious—such as when the crop was decimated by a pest or a disease—and you might be able to take precautions against it (more about that below). In some cases, however, it’s not possible to identify what went wrong. That's okay! Last year—inspired by a friend who had brought me a large bag of plump fresh lima beans from his suburban garden—I tried to grow lima beans myself. Although the plants looked very healthy, tall and lush, there were barely any beans on them. I have no idea why and until I have figured it out, I won’t set myself up for another failure, so won’t plant lima beans again.
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Photo by Rocky Luten In 2022, Lunar New Year will begin on February 1. For My Shanghai author Betty Liu, it's a joyful celebration filled with family gatherings and edible treats. Most of these foods enjoyed during Lunar New Year in China, from egg dumplings to tatsoi to sticky rice cakes, are eaten to symbolize various well-wishes for the coming year. In this excerpt, Liu shares some of those Lunar New Year foods and their meanings. As a child, Lunar New Year meant family gatherings, the hustle and bustle of preparations for a delicious feast, and 红包 hong bao, “red envelopes filled with monetary gifts.” I didn’t think about it much beyond that, but as I grew older, having spent some of these holidays away from family, I began to appreciate how much this holiday was rooted in togetherness. The lunar calendar is based on the movement of the moon, a method of timekeeping used, in part, because of China’s agrarian society. The start of a new cycle, the Lunar New Year is perhaps one of the most anticipated festivals in China. Preparation starts days before the new year and festivities extend halfway into the first month. The migration is phenomenal—more than three billion people make their way home to celebrate with their families. The preparations for this holiday are some of my favorite memories from childhood: helping my mom with small tasks like washing vegetables, wrapping dumplings, and setting the table. The anticipation was an energy in and of itself: giddy and utterly exciting. On New Year’s Eve, guests are welcomed with cups of tea and fresh fruit. Places are set for those who cannot return home. Specific foods are served for their symbolism—anything to maximize prosperity. Fish, whose Chinese character, 鱼 yu, is a homophone for surplus, 余 yu, is served whole for fortune. Golden egg dumplings because they resemble gold ingots of a time past. Tatsoi, 塌棵菜 ta ke cai or ta ku cai in Chinese, in Shanghainese sounds phonetically similar to 脱苦 tuo ku, which means “warding off any bitterness for the new year.” 年糕 nian gao, “sticky rice cake,” is served because it contains the character for “year,” and the second character, gao, is a homophone for “high.” Together, “year high” symbolizes upward mobility in the coming year. 灶君 Zao Jun, the “stove god,” oversees all household activities. According to tradition, he checks in on the twentieth day of the twelfth lunar month and assesses the household. For this reason, everything is left in place until then. When he departs on the twenty-third or twenty-fourth (depending on the region) to report to 玉皇 Yu Huang, the “Jade Emperor,” families begin the pre–New Year ritual of cleansing the home, kicking up dust and shifti
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There’s a good reason why many people refer to kitchens as the heart of the home. Sure, they get a lot of foot traffic daily—from family dinners and intimate date nights to post-school study sessions—but more than that, they act as a microcosm for our daily lives, routine, and outlook. The forms our kitchens take—and the way they morph year over a year—says a lot more about us than just what color we’re loving lately. They reflect back on our priorities, our struggles, and our goals, both for our homes and our lives. For that reason, the expert-driven trends below for 2022 are really more than just trends. Granted, there are a few mixed in just for the pretty factor they provide but the majority of these new kitchen upgrades are a prime example of our collective shifting priorities amid life in a pandemic. From the return of color—and a reinvigoration of a positive perspective—to the prioritizing of natural materials and do-it-all finishes, they encapsulate a time and a place that we all hope is filled with more love, laughter, and yes, good food—just like a kitchen (and life) should be. Gone are the days where homeowners had to choose to forgo cabinets and display their wares on beautiful (but slightly impractical) open shelving or cave to a kitchen designed for storage but not style. These days, designers are focusing on crafting spaces that are both creative and utilitarian, giving home chefs the best of both worlds—a space that functions and looks good while doing it. In fact, Houzz’s 2022 U.S Kitchen Trends Study showed that the popularity of built-in specialty organizers is only increasing, with more than half of homeowners upgrading their space with storage solutions. “Having a decluttered and organized kitchen not only helps with function but also brings a sense of calm and order to a home,” says Carrie Delaney of Carrie Delaney Interiors. “People spend so much time in their kitchen, so thoughtful storage and organizational solutions are key. From spices and bakeware to simple things like the paper towel roll, getting creative with storage helps a kitchen both look and function better.” “Kitchens are evolving as our needs are,” adds Chad Dorsey of Chad Dorsey Design. “More than ever, clients are asking for hardworking kitchens that are high-performance without sacrificing on design. They want their kitchens to feel comfortable, with ample space to take them through the needs of their day. From having an intimate nook to work or sip a morning espresso to spacious, custom-made ranges and other appliances that gather families and friends to cook together.” Into 2022, designers and homeowners are taking every opportunity to imbue a space with personality, a perspective that will extend beyond cabinet colors and hardware finishes into bold, attention-grabbing countertop materials. Houzz’s study recently reported that over one-third of homeowners completing a home kitchen renovation or design chose to spl
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In October 2021, Edith’s, a Brooklyn eatery specializing in foods of the Jewish diaspora, announced on Instagram that they were planning to hand out cans of Dr. Brown’s Cel-Ray—the chartreuse celery-flavored soda that’s a staple in Jewish delis—to trick-or-treaters on Halloween. Elyssa Heller, founder and CEO of the restaurant, explained that she wanted to introduce more folks in the neighborhood to the drink. But there was a problem: As they prepared to place a large order of the soda from their distributor, Heller’s team discovered there was no Cel-Ray to be found. Missing celery soda might not seem like a big problem in the mid
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Bake It Up a Notch is a column by Resident Baking BFF Erin Jeanne McDowell. Each month, she'll help take our baking game to the next level, teaching us all the need-to-know tips and techniques and showing us all the mistakes we might make along the way. When your mother bakes like mine did, childhood is filled with no shortage of sweet memories: I grew up with warm loaves of bread, customized birthday cakes, and cookies so good they had a real reputation at school bake sales. But as soon as I moved aw
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Sleep Smarts is your guide to shut-eye—with trusty tips, product recs, and new routines for a better night’s rest. The murkiest memory I have from the
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We’ve teamed up with Blue Apron to keep dinner interesting—and stress-free as can be. Whether you’re a weekday vegetarian or all-around omnivore, Blue Apron’s ever-changing menus have recipes for every palate. Bonus: Every meal kit you receive is designed to minimize waste, with only the ingredients you need and packaging that can be reused or recycled. New Year’s resolutions are notoriously hard to keep. But there’s one resolution (or if you prefer, intention) that might be a bit easier to stick with, since it’ll help you save money and food—all while doing something good for the environment, too: reducing food waste at home. Tackling food waste is one of the most impactful things you can do to lower your carbon footprint. Plus, every person making a change, no matter how small, can help cut back on the staggering amount of food that is never eaten in the United States each year (up to 40 percent, according to the National Resources Defense Council). Luckily, preventing food waste doesn’t have to mean a huge lifestyle overhaul. Instead, it’s all about tiny habit shifts—including how you shop, portion, and store things. With that in mind, here are seven low-effort tips and ideas for reducing food waste in your kitchen in the new year and beyond. 1. Know your habits Whether it’s cucumbers that liquify before you use them, greens that melt in their plastic tub, or a container of sour cream that grows fuzz, there are likely particular foods that you throw out repeatedly. Pay attention to what ends up in the trash and use this to guide your choices at the grocery store. Maybe next time you buy the smaller container of sour cream or a whole head of lettuce (they stay fresh longer) instead of the bagged variety. Or perhaps you’re just not the type to make salads at home. Don’t feel guilty—we’ve all aspirationally bought ingredients we didn’t cook—but recognizing and changing your food waste weaknesses can help you reduce waste in the future. 2. Don’t buy meat without a plan We recommend shopping with a list to prevent
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We’ve teamed up with Apeel to highlight our favorite avocado recipes for every time of day. Apeel is plant-based protection that locks moisture in and keeps oxygen out, which makes for longer-lasting produce and helps reduce food waste. When the just-ripe avocado you bought a few days ago is quickly approaching an unappetizing level of brown, sometimes slapping it on a piece of toast is all you’ve got time for. But what if you could extend the shelflife of that precious green fruit? Think of all the possibilities: delicate avocado dumplings in a savory tomato broth, Genius-approved guacamole, savory avocado-stuffed French toast, and even dreamy vegan chocolate mousse. To accomplish all of this without multiple trips to the grocery store, you’ll need to grab a few Apeel-Protected Avocados. Apeel’s plant-based protection extends the shelf life of avos, giving you more time to experiment in the kitchen with this versatile ingredient. To help you make the most of your avocados, we’ve rounded up 13 of our best avocado recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert (yes, dessert!). 1. Avocado Crab Rolls Move over lobster, there’s a new roll in town. This recipe doubles
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Photo by Maurizio Leo The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer turned bread expert (and Food52's Resident Bread Baker) Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather a lot of butter on. Today, a sourdough version of Danish kanelstang. If you’ve ever baked pain d’épi, which is a classic French baguette made to look like a stalk of wheat, you’re familiar with the charm of rolling, snipping, and twisting, yielding a baked good that livens up any dinner table. Instead of scoring the dough with a razor blade and letting it rise straight up, the bread is cut with scissors into alternating petals. The Danish kanelstang (which translates to “cinnamon stick”) has the same vibe as the pain d'épi, but just filled with sugar, butter, and warm spices. Think American-style sweet cinnamon roll with fancy French shaping—a mix of flavor and aesthetic that’s perfect for a morning or afternoon treat. Use your sourdough starter Typically, kanelstang is made with commercial yeast, but in my version, I went with 100 percent natural leavening. With most sweet baked goods, I tend to make a dedicated levain to ensure minimal sourness and ample yeast activity (for more rise). However, in testing, I found this kanelstang tasted fantastic and rose sufficiently well when I simply used my ripe sourdough starter in the mix. And while you could always make a dedicated levain if you’d like (I’d go with 100 percent all-purpose flour and a quick 3- to 5-hour ripening time), it’s hard to beat simply waking up in the morning and, with little to no planning, starting a dough and ending up with a delicious snack later in the day. Just be sure you use your sourdough starter when it’s ripe, meaning it has fermented for some number of hours (for me, that’s ov
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Photo by Courtesy @Igrobflo on TikTok The internet loves little more than to gawk at the culinary horrors of TikTok, and the latest one making the rounds features “Sleepy Chicken,” which involves cooking chicken breasts in a neon sea of cough syrup. The online articles about it gasp at the dangers of the supposed trend, interviewing doctors about the potential harm and making vague allusions to how widespread and horrifying it is. (And to be clear: Do not do this—it is not a great plan from a poison safety standpoint.) But none seem to demonstrate any actual evidence that people tried to cook their chicken in cough syrup and actually ate it. At least one person cooked the dish: The original video demonstrating sleepy chicken came out in 2020, from what is clearly a satire account—in another video, he grocery shops dressed as a banana and tries to pay in “banana cash.” His pioneering recipe for sleepy chicken involves measurements such as “four thirds of a bottle,” techniques like pouring the used cough syrup back into the bottle, and instructions to boil for “five to thirty minutes.” The finished dish includes obviously still-raw chicken, now an iridescent bluish-green shade. It did not include footage of anyone eating it. Like the time Gen Z took heat for not believing birds are real and the whole “TidePod challenge” era, little evidence exists that anyone has actually consumed sleepy chicken. Certainly, as the doctors interviewed by horrified writers at the NY Post and Newsweek explain, it would be a terrible idea: cooking concentrates the medicine making it easy to take too much. And anyone who lived through the “robotripping” era of drugs (which, unfortunately, was a real thing) can tell you: it is a no-good, very bad idea. Thankfully, nobody seems to be truly ingesting the disgusting “Sleepy Chicken” and if you search TikTok with t
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Photo by Rocky Luten. Prop Stylist: Alya Hameedi. Food Stylist: Anna Billingskog. The world's largest chicken wing hangs from a hook outside of a Hooters in Madeira Beach, Florida. According to a blog post published by national chain restaurant Wings & Rings, the wing weighs half a ton and hangs from a 14-foot-tall crossbeam, over three buckets of hot sauce. It is a replica of a drumette made from plastic, and when I called the establishment to inquire about why, the woman who answered the phone said simply, “It’s just a gimmick, a joke.”
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Photo by Getty Images I’ve been an insomniac since I was in sixth grade. Sleeping through the night has just never come easy for me, no matter what I do. I do all the sleep hygiene things you’re supposed to: no caffeine after noon, no alcohol three hours before bed (I mean most of the time), exercise, go to sleep and wake up on the same schedule, no screens. But I’ll still myself awake at 3 am, trying desperately to avoid checking the alarm clock and repeating the mental calculation of how much sleep I can get if I just managed to fall asleep right now and how tire
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Here at Food52, we love recipes—but do we always use them? Of course not. Because once you realize you don't always need a recipe, you'll make your favorite dishes a lot more often. Today: Whether you grew up on your bubbe's kugel or you have no idea what kugel is, you can (and should) make a perfectly sweet, family-friendly casserole that will have you noshing in no time. Noodle Kugel is a staple in Ashkenazi Jewish culinary traditions, but if you haven’t attended any Ashkenazi Jewish celebrations, you might not have encountered one before. Even if you are familiar with kugel (acceptably pronounced both "coogle" and "kuggol"), and I sure hope you are, it’s entirely possible that you’ve never tried it before. And you are not alone. And also, you are in for a joyful surprise. These are the actual, real life, semi-coherent responses of first-time noodle kugel eaters after their initial taste: “It’s like sweet macaroni and cheese.” “Egg noodles plus corn flakes plus soft stuff plus crumby.” “Soft, warm, gushy, lightly sweet.” “It could be a side dish, or a dessert, or a breakfast.” 
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Malt is a shape-shifter. It comes in the form of a powder. And vinegar. And syrup Sometimes it's a milkshake; other times it shows up in New York City bagels, and then—poof—it's a vinegar, and then it's back—but this time it's in our beer and whiskey. So what actually is malt? As it turns out, malt refers to grains that have undergone a process that makes them sweeter and give them qualities that aid in the fermentation process. They are used as the base for countless things we enjoy everyday—candy and milkshakes included: What Is Malt? Malt is a cereal grain, typically barley, that, once sprouted, is dried (in a process called malting). Once dried, malt is often ground into a slightly sweet powder, interchangeably referred to simply as malt or sweet meal. It tastes sweet because before the grains are dried, they’re soaked in water to allow them to germinate, then the germination is halted with hot air. Without getting too deep into the science, a sugar called maltodextrine is developed in addition to the sucrose and fructose already existing in the grain, making it sweet to taste. Photo by Emily Hilliard In addition to the sugars, enzymes are developed that aid in fermentation processes, hence its popularity in the beer and whiskey industries.The result is a sweet, protein-rich, fermenting substance that’s used in baking, vinegar, enriched flour, distilling liquor, and milk beverages, to name a few.
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Photo by Mark Weinberg The best kitchen tips are usually passed along from friends, or parents, or—if you work in an office with an always-bustling test kitchen—from colleagues. And such is the case with perfectly cooked hard-boiled eggs. We all learned to cook them from someone, somewhere; they're personal, they're nostalgic, and also pretty genius. But make no mistakes—they can be finicky, and, when hard-boiled, a real pain to peel. Enter one of our own, Blake, with his trick for the perfect way to peel perfect hard boiled egg, gleaned from the kitchen of Blue Hill where he used to work. We tried his method immediately, and tested it a whole bunch of times, and we've never looked back. What followed was a whole new world—and some massively upgraded deviled eggs, egg salad, and protein-packed snacks. So, here, without delay, is the absolute cleanest, most pain-free way to peel a hard boiled egg, no blowing or wooden cane required. Peeling the perfect hard boiled egg starts with cooking eggs, of course. Cook your eggs however you like—in a pot of boiling water with a splash of vinegar
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I’ll be the first to admit that Valentine's Day sometimes feels like a Hallmark holiday. Why do we need just one day to show the people in our lives how much we love them? And if it isn’t even a “real” holiday, why is getting a dinner reservation on February 14 so hard? But, even through these gripes, I love Valentine's Day—the candy, the sweet gift exchanges, and the sentimentality of it all. I’m a sucker for nostalgia and it’s the perfect time to show your favorite people that you care about them. Whether you’re looking to make a big romantic gest
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About a decade ago, Jennifer Samuels would spend the months of Carnival in New Orleans furiously baking, baking, baking. Even though La Dolce Nola, which she owned, was a gelato shop, there was one thing every year that helped keep things going: King cake. "It went really, really well," Samuels said. Back then, she was making cakes with flavors that seemed "a little out there," beyond the traditional cinnamon and brioche locals know and instead reached for fresh strawberry, lemon curd, and Nutella. Though the gelato shop ended up closing, her obsession with finding
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Whether you’re hosting a Game Day party or a casual cocktail party with friends, kick off the festivities with appetizers galore—think: spinach-artichoke or buffalo chicken dip served with pita chips, air fryer chicken wings with blue cheese dipping sauce, pigs in a blanket, deviled eggs, and cheesy pull-apart bread. And when all else fails, you can’t go wrong with a colorful array of crudité and sourdough crackers. 1. Virginia Willis' Deviled Eggs There are a million variations on deviled eggs on the
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Every week in Genius Recipes—often with your help!—Food52 Founding Editor and lifelong Genius-hunter Kristen Miglore is unearthing recipes that will change the way you cook. This overachiever is really two Genius Recipes, and will revolutionize your cooking in so many ways. It will give you a freezable sauce that—in a single step (blend)—can instantly bring life to any dinner that needs it. And it points to the place you’ll want to unleash that sauce first: a one-pot chicken soup that isn’t just brothy, restorative, and cold-curing in the ways that all good chicken soups are
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There are so many beautiful flowers, but we humans certainly have a special relationship with tulips. And when we love something, we want to hold on to it for as long as possible. After the tulips have finished blooming, we want to see them bloom again the year after… and the year after that. In locations with cold winters, tulip bulbs can stay in the ground after the bloom. The foliage withers and slowly disintegrates and you wouldn’t know there are tulips in the soil until they poke their tips out again the next spring. In locations with sweltering hot summers and mild winters, however, tulips cannot survive. For that reason, some people dig up the tulip bulbs after the bloom and store them in the refrigerator to mimic the cold period that tulips require.
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The babka I grew up with was bad. It was dry and crumbly and full of trans fat. It came from a grocery store in the same suburban strip mall as my orthodontist Dr. Diamond's office and, in our household, counted only my parents as fans. I never would've dreamt of sharing a photo of it—all stale and nubby next to the bagels on the top shelf our fridge—on Instagram. Today's babkas, however, are runway models and pageview guarantors. They're one part buttery dough, one part chocolate chunks, and one part air. They're twisted, striated, and marbled; streusel-topped, syrup-soaked, and ice cream sandwich'd. They're plastered all over the Internet, the starlets of Smitten Kitchen (2007 and 2014), Bon Appétit (2016), Food
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Photo by Rocky Luten Welcome to Playing Favorites, a new monthly series that puts our most beloved tools and gadgets front and center. Check in each month as our favorite cooks, authors, designers, and experts share what they reach for over and over again. From the dust-buster that misses nothing to the blender that tackles anything and the packing cubes that make travel a cinch, it’s the one time when playing favorites is a good thing. I began my journey to declutter the volumes of paper I’d amassed like I do most daunting tasks: with e
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Photo by Rocky Luten For quite a few years now, bedroom design has erred on the side of light and bright—you know, white walls, creamy drapes, minimal art and decor—but I happen to think that’s far from the only way of doing things. Last year, I painted the back wall of my bedroom in a deep, brownish gray (Otter Tail by Behr, to be specific), and I loved it so much that I knew I’d likely never go back to a bright white bedroom. With two coats of paint on just one wall, my bedroom immediately felt more like the sanctuary almost everyone is reaching f
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Owning a Dutch oven is proof that you’ve made it. No matter what else is going on in your life, you can come home to a dependable piece of cookware that will cook soups, stews, braised meats, and bread better than any other piece of equipment in your kitchen. My Le Creuset Dutch Oven is one of my prized possessions. It’s bright orange—a color I intentionally chose because it’s the brand’s signature hue—and has a gold knob, that I swapped myself and never looked back. Who needs a dining room tablewhen you have a Le Creuset Dutch oven? (Don’t answer that, I know how it sounds.) Of course, Le Creuset isn’t the only brand that makes dutch ovens. Nowadays you have your pick from established kitchenware brands like Emile H
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Photo by Ty Mecham First Things First is a series chronicling the morning beverage routines of some of our favorite people. What can you learn about a person from their coffee mug collection? If that someone is Aaron Polsky, the Los Angeles–based founder of ready-to-drink cocktail company LiveWire Drinks, you’d rightfully surmise that he’s a loving cat dad with an affinity for rock and roll, Larry David’s bristly sense of humor, and old-school Nintendo games. But then, as you make your way toward
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Photo by Rocky Luten A new year is often a time for reflection—and your friendly Food52 recipe contest community moderators have been doing our own sort of reflecting, and looking back at all of the past contest themes. If you are new to our recipe contests or a veteran contestant who wants to take a walk down memory lane, check out these past contests that we loved: Your Best Late Winter Tart (Sweet or Savory) A&M Smackdown / Your Best Peach Pie or Tart You Best Mash-Up Recipe But in our lookback, we were really most struck by our very f
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Welcome to Real-Life Renos, where we’re pulling back the curtains to the home renos we just can’t get enough of. Tag along as our favorite designers, chefs, and cookbook authors welcome us inside their spaces and share the behind-the-scenes stories behind their transformations. We’ll explore their takes on sustainable living, how they express their identities through design, how they create beautiful spaces that center around accessibility—and so much more. At the height of the pandemic last year, my partner Casey and I bought a second home. We had always dreamt of owning a place we could escape to on the weekends, as so many in the city long to do. We began our search just prior to the outbreak of COVID.
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Barrel-aged beers are popular right now: Fans stand outside of some breweries the day before a bottle release for the chance to snag the special, and often limited, liquid. Some collectors may try to buy them online in sales that sell out in seconds. Many breweries require patrons to enter a lottery for a chance to buy releases to make it a little fairer. A majority of these 12- to 25-ounce beers sell for $20 to $100 a bottle, and end up reselling for hundreds or even $1,000 on secondary markets. But it wasn’t always like this. Back when Chicago’s Goose Island entered one of its first batches of Bourbon County Brand Stout—the beer that kickstarted the barrel-aged stout style—into the Great American Beer Festival in 1995, the competition didn’t even ha
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Photo by Rocky Luten Reading books about stone soup, and green eggs and ham were entertaining and fun when I was young, but as a Korean-American kid who grew up eating westernized suburban fare and injeolmi toast from my birth country, they barely resembled my culture and definitely didn’t reflect my family’s dinner table. Still, I never questioned the lack of representation and the implications it had on my understanding of my own culture until I read Bee-bim-bop! last year as a full-grown adult. It’s a beautiful
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After two weeks of drinking sleep-inducing herbal teas, I have never been so tired in my life. Flavor aside, these teas knocked me out. Like in the middle of the workday and during my pre-bed yoga practice (sorry, Adriene). Drinking tea before bed is said to have a calming effect, improve sleep quality, and overall give you a restful sleep. Here’s the thing: I haven’t had a bad night’s sleep since 1995 when I was a nocturnal newborn. I’ve slept through phones ringing in the middle of the night and literal trees falling down (the norm during snowy Connecticut winters). I didn’t think I had any sleep problems that needed fixing, especially from just an eight-ounce cup of bedtime tea, but I was wrong. As I worked my way through 54 different caffeine-free
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Photo by Rocky Luten I can’t remember the first time I tried Chardonnay, which I’m sure is due, in part, to the fact that it was so bad I blocked the tasting experience from my memory. Chardonnay is one of the white wine varietals that’s pretty ubiquitous. It’s guaranteed to be one of two, maybe three reliable white wines available at a wedding. It’s a variety that, in a sea of intimidating wine lingo on an extensive drinks menu, is familiar and approachable. At a liquor store three blocks from your college campus, you’ll be hard-pressed to find Sancerre or Txakoli (not a problem for the 19-year-old with a fake I.D. that hasn't heard of Txakoli), but you’ll have your pick of Chardonnays under $15. All of this is to say that Chardonnay and I have taken more than a few walks around the block and we never got along. It was easy for me to write off Chardonnay entirely. That is, until I was introduced to unoaked Chardonnay. The characteristics that I dislike in a glass of Chardonnay—those buttery, oaky, rich vanilla notes—are polarizing. You either love ’em or you hate ’em. If you’re in the anti-buttery camp allow me to offer you a good time with unoaked Chardonnay. Unoaked vs. Unoaked Chardonnay If Chardonnay is the popular sorority girl who everyone knows, unoaked Chardonnay is its ar
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Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more. Today: Get to know a tropical tuber you might have been missing out on. If you thought Jerusalem artichokes were confusingly named, it turns out tropical tubers might be even more perplexing. Taro is a root vegetable, but it’s not one that typically shows up in the average American grocery store. What Is Taro? In Roots, Diane Morgan explains that “taro” is the common name for four different root crops: 1) malanga or American taro (Xanthosoma sagittifolium); 2) giant swamp taro (Cyrtosperma chamissonis); 3) false taro or giant taro (Alocasia macrorrhiza); and 4) true taro (Colocasia esculenta).  True taro is what we are talking about today, but even once we’ve established that, the nomenclature can still be bewildering. Taro goes by a number of different names (satoimo, elephant’s ear, cocoyam, etc.), which is not all that surprising considering that, like all things, taro has its own name in every different place that it’s grown and that taro is grown in more than 40 countries. It's actually one of the world’s oldest cultivated plants, as Morgan elaborates: “References suggest that it has been domesticated for over five thousand years in tropical Southeast Asia, cultivated even before rice or millet.” Taro is sometimes referred to as "taro root," too, but while we're getting technical, the part of the plant we eat that is grown underground (the leaves and leaf-stems are edible, too) is not the roots, but rather the corms
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Just as appetites are growing for ancient wheat flours like spelt, Kamut, and einkorn, so too is consumer demand for naturally gluten-free flours like buckwheat, sorghum, and teff—albeit a bit more slowly. Little by little, whether they have gluten intolerances or not, bakers are beginning to appreciate the unique flavors presented by gluten-free alternatives. The result? Tastier loaves of gluten-free bread. 1. Stock Up on "Short" & "Long" Flours “Gluten-free isn’t a fad diet, and it isn’t a diet that lacks,” said Naomi Devlin, the U.K.-based author of River Cottage Gluten Free. “It potentially could be a diet that has a lot more flavor and diversity in it.” Despite being seemingly everywhere, gluten is found only in three cereals: barley, wheat, and rye (plus hybrids like triticale). On the other hand, gluten-free grains and cereals are far more numerous: buckwheat, teff, millet, corn, sorghum, rice, lentil, chickpea, almond, quinoa, amaranth—the list goes on. Unlike the more standardized bleached all-purpose wheat flours available en masse at grocery stores, gluten-free flours each have their own flavor profiles, capabilities, and limitations. “The way I break flours down is into long and short flours. I think of them as a kind of spectrum, with short flours like corn and rice being crumbly and dry; and long flours like oat and buckwheat being stretchy, binding, and capable of holding a shape. Teff is somewhere toward the long end. In the middle, you have things like quinoa, millet, and chestnut,” said Devlin. “[For gluten-free breads], you’re often looking at combining a long flour with a short flour in order to get the benefits of both. You want the short flour to dry out the crumb of the bread, and you want the long flour to provide stretch and chew.” Most gluten-free recipes will call for a blend of different flours to achieve the desired texture and flavor. In addition to providing structure and elasticity to doughs, gluten helps retain moisture in wheat-based sourdough loaves. Without it, gluten-free breads tend to go stale
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Photo by Ty Mecham The other night, while scrolling through social media, I came across a video of someone releasing a jar full of 1,500 ladybugs into their home. My initial reaction was something along the lines of, “Oh my gosh, why would you do that?!” Growing up, hundreds of ladybugs moved into our house every winter, swarming the windows and forming little clusters in the corners of every room. In response, my family spent a lot of time trying to get them out of the house. To watch someone release them indoors on purpose? It just seemed wrong! Digging a little further, I found a number of houseplant enthusiasts who swear by the practice, regularly setting hundreds—sometimes thousands—of ladybugs free in their homes in the name of… pest control. Obviously, I had a lot of questions: What, exactly, do they control? Do you really need that many of them? And, most importantly, does it actually work?! I reached out to a few bug and gardening experts for answers—here’s what they had to say.
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Photo by ROCKY LUTEN. PROP STYLIST: VERONICA OLSON. FOOD STYLIST: SAMANTHA SENEVIRATNE. We’ve teamed up with Blue Apron to keep dinner interesting—and stress-free as can be. Whether you’re a weekday vegetarian or all-around omnivore, Blue Apron’s ever-changing menus have recipes for every palate. Bonus: Every meal kit you receive comes with exact amount of ingredients you need plus a handy recipe card with step-by-step photos and even a wine pairing recommendation. When it comes to New Year's Eve celebrations, I can take them or leave 'em. I'm just as happy to go out and celebrate with a group of friends as I am to spend the evening solo on the couch in my matching pajama set with a good movie and a mini bottle of Champagne (falling asleep before the ball drops, of course). I much prefer New Year's Day, when the resolutions I made the night before are fresh and full of promise. But while the upcoming year may be a blank slate, I can't say the same for my kitchen—all that holiday cooking, cocktail mixing, and party hosting takes its toll on that space after two straight months. That's why every January I take a weekend to reset my kitchen. This not only helps me refresh my cooking mindset (and get me excited to try new dishes), but it also helps me settle into a routine for the new year. From cleaning out the fridge to sharpening your knives, here are five things you can do to hit the reset button on your own kitchen space. 1. Do a Fridge & Pantry Clean-Out No matter how hard I try, my refrigerator and pantry always seem to be a mess after the holidays. Spices thrown into the cabinets with no sense of order, half-eaten bags of snacks, an old piece of ginger or citrus nearing complete dehydration in the back of the fridge—these are my cues that it's time to do a big clean-out. I'll note what non-perishables I have stocked (so I don't double up on my next grocery
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"Banchan is very important to me," says Sunny Lee, who leads the banchan program at the Korean restaurant Insa in Brooklyn, New York. "It has a very long history in Korea." Banchan means side dish in Korean, but in reality it's a bunch of small dishes filled to the brim with pickles and the like that scatter the table at lunch or dinner. And if you've ever eaten at a Korean barbecue restaurant, or somewhere more traditional, you'll know them by their multitude, and that they all somehow fit together: often different kimchis and beans, or sprouts and tiny fish to snack on before and with a meal. I asked Sunny, and Michael Stokes, Insa's chef de cuisine, to give me a lowdown on banchan, and how its history details much of Korea's itself. Sunny and Michael incorporate ingredients into their banchan that you wouldn't normally see—for instance, locally grown kale—mostly because they try to source many of their ingredients regionally, to reflect the indigenous vegetables of the city and New York State and to give the food a homey vibe, to remove it from the restaurant setting. And while a lot of Korean restaurants never change their banchan offerings (kimchi is kimchi is kimchi), Insa's rotates seasonally to showcase what's growing at that moment nearby, with techniques and flavorings that aren't replicated again and again. "A lot of people think that banchan is just kimchi, but actually less than half is kimchi," Sunny says. A lot of people think that banchan is just kimchi, but actually less than half is kimchi. Sunny Lee, who leads the banchan program at Insa in Brooklyn, NY And this approach, they say, actually more accurately reflects how banchan has been made and consumed throughout its history. "During the Joseon period, 1392 AD to 1897 AD, the branches of the Six Ministries—basically governmental departments—were tasked with procuring foods from the eight regions of Korea each month," Michael explains. He goes on to tell me that specialties from each region were highlighted on th
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Photo by Bobbi Lin Look into any millennial’s home and you’ll spot a bunch of green plant babies from teeny-tiny air plants to short stalks of bamboo. Indoor plants aren’t a new trend; they’ve long been a way for people to connect with nature and bring the outdoors in—and the word “plantfluencer” has become part of our dail
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Photo by Margaret Eby Maybe you’ve never heard of bread cheese, let alone pizza bread cheese. Maybe before you saw the package in Trader Joe’s you assumed it might mean cheese on top of bread, or bread stuffed with cheese, or maybe bread that has been somehow transmogrified into cheese. But no: Bread cheese, also known as juustoleip
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Photo by Julia Gartland “What’s your go-to night cheese?” My fiance’s best friend, Billy, asked us one night when we were hanging out in their small Astoria apartment. “Night cheese?” I asked. “Yeah, night cheese. Like what cheese do you eat in the middle of the night?” he asked. For all you cool cats and kittens who are in the know, you’ve probably guessed that Billy was referencing the scene from 30 Rock, which depicts protagonist Liz Lemon sprawled out on her couch, tucked under a fuzzy blue blanket. Beside her is a medium-sized wooden charcuterie board covered with an assortment of different cheeses. “Working on my night cheese,” Lemon sings to herself, to the tune of “Night Moves” by Bob Seger, before her solo dairy date is interrupted by her boss, Jack Donaghy (played by Alec Baldwin), knocking at the door. But it’s not just a funny sitcom joke from the mid-2000s. Night cheese is a great idea. When you want something that’s savory before bed, why not cheese? I turned to the experts for their take on the best cheese to snack on as you’re singing to yourself underneath a heated blanket. For starters, what exactly qualifies as a good night cheese? If you’re snacking post-dinner but pre-bedtime, think of what will go well with your preferred nightcap. “The perfect night cheese is something more spreadable with a hint of funk and strength but not so strong that it will overpower my glass of bubbly,” says Mary Chapman, owner and cheesemonger of The Cheese Shop of Portland. If your preferred nightcap is a responsible glass of water or a cup of sleep-inducing chamomile tea, you have options, but I like to think that a firm cheese with a slightly grassy flavor would nicely complement your wind-down routine. Night cheese isn’t just about flavor, just like you wouldn’t buy a pair of jeans only because they’re on sale—it has to be both practical and of the moment. Cheddar is easier than a soft, runny cheese, for example. Plus, think about your nig
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Photo by James Ransom Even if you don’t know the difference between a touchdown or a field goal, or offense vs. defense, you can appreciate a good batch of chicken wings at a Super Bowl party. After all, you came here for the snacks, right? To kick off your game day festivities, we’re sharing our favorite wing sauce recipes, from the sticky sweet to the fiery. When you think of chicken wings, buffalo sauce is probably the first thing that comes to mind, right? A generous coating of Frank’s RedHot with a cool ranch dipping sauce on the side is obviously what the Super Bowl is really about. Pro tip: Food52’s Creative Director Kristen Miglore (and resident Genius) thinks that garlic confit enhances the flavor of buffalo sauce even more, so try incorporating a few cloves puréed roasted garlic. Mark Bittman’s go-to recipe for Buffalo Chicken Wings starts with wings broiled in the oven until crispy. While the wings cook, he makes the sauce using hot sauce, melted butter, sherry vinegar, and minced garlic. As soon as the wings are browned and crispy, toss them with sauce and broil for a few minutes more. If you’re not into super spicy wings, the game isn’t over. You can whip up a finger-licking sauce that won’t have you running to the fridge for a glass of mi
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Photo by Bobbi Lin The most fun I’ve ever had in my life—better than a trip to Disney World or eating a "Cheeseburger in Paradise" at Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville—was building my wedding registry. Choosing fine china, overpriced picture frames, and luxurious glassware for other people to buy me has been, to this day, the peak of my existence. Choosing bed sheets on the other hand? That’s on par with waiting 28 minutes for the next Q train at Times Square on a Wednesday night... at 10:45pm. Don’t get me wrong: I love a comfortable, neat bed and am firmly Team Flat Sheet, but when it comes to actually picking bed sheets—white sheets, to be specific—the options are, and I don’t mean to be dramatic, literally endless. I didn’t know much about what I was looking for in a “good” sheet set, so I thought “let’s start with thread count”! I knew that the higher the thread count was, the better the sheets would be (or, at least I thought this was the case). My fiancé and I went to every major department and bedding store comparing how sheets felt and still found ourselves totally lost. I knew it was time to turn to some experts in order to shop my way to a better night’s sleep.
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Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more. Today: We've been stocking up on fresh herbs to get our spring fix. Next up, marjoram. Marjoram is like a thumb. (Stay with me here.) Earlier this week, I gave my daughter a preschool level anatomy lesson and explained the names we have for different fingers: thumb, pointer finger, and so on. Then I got cocky and added: “You have one thumb on each hand, and thumbs are fingers, but not all fingers are thumbs.”  My daughter got a little lost, but because you're not three-and-a-half-years-old, you might already know where I’m going: Marjoram (Origanum majorana) used to belong to its own genus, but now it belongs to the same genus as oregano (Origanum vulgare). This means that all marjoram is now a type of oregano, but just as all fingers are not thumbs, all oregano is not marjoram. It’s an herb that you can find year-round but is mainly in season during the summer, fall, and winter months. It’s known for its sweet, spicy flavor that is mild compared to oregano. But marjoram is its own herb, damn it, and we are finally giving it the spotlight that it deserves.  What Does Marjoram Taste Like Marjoram looks similar to oregano, which is perhaps not surprising since they are so closely related, but there are differences in flavor. As Deborah Madison explains: “Marjoram’s flavor lacks the oiliness and abrasiveness of oregano. Marjoram is more delicate and floral than oregano. It is sometimes called 'sweet marjoram' and for good reason.” Even if you think you're not familiar with marjoram's flavor, you’ve likely had it in its dried form. Dried marjoram often shows up in herb blends like za’atar and herbs de Provence. By comparison, oregano is in season from late fall through early spring and has a more pronounced flavor than marjoram. Italian oregano is milder than Greek oregano, which brings even more of a kick to pizza sauce, grilled pork or chicken, fish, and egg dishes. How to Store and Prep Marjoram Store fresh marjoram in the refrigerator: First wrap it in a damp paper towel or tea towel, and then loosely wrap that bundle in plastic wrap or tuck it inside of an airtight container. When you're ready to cook with your fresh marjoram, separate the leaves from the stems (1, above), and then chop the leaves (2, below) as directed and proceed with your dish. Start using more marjoram now, but continue to do so as warmer weather arrives, too. We often consider basil, one of marjoram’s relatives in the Mint family, to be the herb of summer, but Deborah Madison pushes us to consider using marjoram in place of basil “with many summer foods, from tomatoes to zucchini to corn.” Health Benefits of Marjoram You should first and foremost consume marjoram because it’s delicious. But it doesn’t hurt that it’s touted for having antimicrobial properties and anti-inflammatory benefits too. In its fresh or dried form, sweet marjoram
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I have never been a beer person. I’ve tried and failed (or, rather, it failed me). I’ve sipped fruity IPAs that are supposed to taste like a dichotomy of bitter sunshine or juicy pineapple mixed with volcanic ash (all I tasted was ash), Oktoberfest beers to get back to my German roots, and light summer ales (or maybe they were lagers…what’s the difference anyway?). I all but swore of the category altogether, opting for hard ciders at breweries and literally anything else at a restaurant or cocktail bar. That is, until a painfully exhausting day when I helped my sister and her husband move into a new apartment. We were bone tired, hungry, dehydrated, and in desperate need of a cold drink. We grabbed lunch at a nearby brewery where I ordered an 8” cast iron skillet of baked macaroni and cheese and the only hard cider that was on the menu (this is, for the record, my ideal last supper). “Kelly, do you want to try this porter?” my sister offered. “You might like it! It’s not bitter,” she added. My fiancé and mother concurred—”you actually would like it,” my mom urged. “I’ve been telling you for years that you’d like porters or stouts,” Evan, my fiancé added. I pursed my lips, skeptically held out my hand, frowned at the foamy dark liquid set in front of me, and took the smallest sip. I was told I needed to drink more than a ¼ teaspoon of beer in order to taste anything. Fine. I took a regular-sized sip. And then I tried it again, this time drinking what could only be described as a giant gulp. It was smooth in texture, void of any bitterness or hoppy flavors, and tasted like a mocha milkshake. I polished off not one, but two five-ounce tasting glasses. Porters have made me into a beer believer. Here’s why. Porters vs. Stouts Even if, like me, you failed every math class since freshman year of high school, you’ve probably heard the phrase “Every square is a rectangle, but not every rectangle is a square.” Same goes for porters and stouts: all stouts are porters, but not all porters are stouts. Stouts have been, historically, considered to be a sub-category brew within porters that are darker, stronger, and generally more full-bodied. Both are made with a combination of malts and grains, and may be brewed with other ingredients like oats, lactose (milk sugar), or coconut to give them a more dessert-like finish. But What Do They Taste Like? For starters, they don’t taste like pilsners or pale ales. But their appearance can be deceiving. “For some reason, people tend to associate dark beers like porters and stouts with heaviness, high alcohol content, and intensity. But in reality, the porter and stout umbrella offers a wide range of styles from the super "light" bodied and easy drinking dry stouts to the strong, dessert-like "pastry" stouts (and a whole lot in between),” says beer professional Anne Becerra. Some of the misconceptions are warranted though, says Steve Gonzalez,
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Photo by Walmart The Home Edit has been one of my low-key favorite Netflix shows. Clea Shearer and Joanna Teplin are bubbly and approachable; the show gives us a look at their famous clients’ McMansions; and there is tons of practical advice on editing, categorizing, containing, and maintaining everything from clothes and shoes to laundry and kitchen essentials. But, as much as I follow through on Shearer and Teplin’s
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When you want a healthy breakfast that is totally vegetarian-friendly, we’ve got you covered with nearly two dozen recipes (many of which are vegan!). In some cases, you’ll find tha
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Photo by James Ransom I hate to be the bearer of bad news but, there’s been another recall. The good news is that all of these recalls are proof that the right systems are in place to detect recalls and alert consumers. The bad news is, this time, it affects Dole salad mixes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that there is not one, but two, separate Listeria outbreaks linked to packaged salad mixes, one of
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Sometime around the 12th century BCE, Troy fell to the Greeks. As the Roman poet Virgil recounts the story, the mythical hero Aeneas then fled his ravaged city aboard an uncooperative s
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