Some games will just feel better During this week's Nintendo Direct, we found out that N64 games would soon be playable on Switch via Nintendo's online subscription. More importantly, we found out that Nintendo are making a new wireless N64 controller for use with the Switch. You can connect the Switch Pro controller to PC with or without a wire, so it stands to reason I'll be able to use this new N64 controller on PC too, right? Because if so, I'm gonna. I loved the N64 controller. Its middle stem fit my palm perfectly, it had a great D-pad, its Z-button was perfectly placed and satisfyingly clicky, and it introduced me and the world to the analogue stick. The best thing about the controller was that it seemed perfectly designed for the games released on the N64 console. Nintendo have always been good at making hardware and software which feel as if they're working hand in glove (except for the Nintendo Power Glove). I've played Mario 64 with several different controllers since, and it has never felt as good when not on an N64 pad. It therefore makes perfect sense that Nintendo want to recreate the controller so people can play those old classics as originally intended. That's not where my interests lie, however. I have very little appetite for playing Ocarina Of Time again. I imagine there are some emulation enthusiasts who feel differently, but that's not me. The newly announced wireless N64 controller in its box. Also pictured: some Mega Drive trash. Instead, I'm interested in using an N64 controller to play modern games. In particular, I want to use it to play the range of modern games clearly inspired by N64-era Nintendo. You can't tell me, for example that Yooka-Laylee or A Hat In Time aren't going to be instantly 15% better if played with an N64 pad. "But aren't those games going to be designed for more modern pads," I pretend I can hear you say. Sure, but this new N64 controller being an official Nintendo release all but guarantees it'll be adequately supported one way or another. Thing is, you can technically already use an N64 controller on PC. You could e
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. And improves the foxholes. Foxhole has made foxholes better. The Entrenched update for the massive, multiplayer sandbox war game adds a lot, but top of the pile is new building tools for crafting better bunkers, trenches, and frontline defenses. The update is live now, and there's a video introducing its many features below. Foxhole's world is now substantially larger than before, with seven new regions to the north and seven to the south. That includes new towns and villages, and enough space to support up to 3000 players in a single, persistent war. There are also 15 new uniforms so each type of soldier looks different, new tank classes, a better camera system and much more. But it's the new combat engineer activities that interest me most. You can now constr
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When you've played a lot of games, or seen a lot of films, or probably eaten at a lot of restaurants or generally oversaturated your life with one subject, it's easy to start making rules and codes for How It Should Be. I given a lot of games a hard time for being opaque and failing to explain themselves. And yet here I am, finally writing about Mech Engineer after watching and playing it for nine months, waiting for it to hit the point where I can almost, sort of, not exactly recommend it... but share my fascination with it. It's conceptually novel, for one. You're the AI director of an orbital mining station that crashlanded on Earth when some idiot humans opened an interdimensional portal and aliens poured through. They swiftly conquered the planet and are ravaging and terraforming its surface while you... retooled your mechs. Your job is to explore the ruined surface, locating and then clearing a path to the facility you can use to take your refugee humans off the planet. Most squares of the gridded planet are reachable, but all are hostile, and the planet only gets worse. Each has a different layout, conditions and resident aliens, but they're all positively teeming with nasties, making even a simple resource hunt through quiet areas dangerous. Those missions are entirely driven by you. There are no story missions or specific directions yet, and they don't work how you might have imagined them. There's very little direct control. A porthole gives you a top down display, upon which your mechs are a handful of green pixels in a sea of green pixels, shooting at other green pixels. And you know what? It looks great. The definition developers KiberKreker have wrung out of this monochrome style is remarkable, and the animations are excellent. If repairs are unaffordable, you can spread the damage around instead, trading one performance penalty for another. Your mechs can put out a tonne of firepower and the way aliens skitter about, lunge, drag you around, and pop open in a shower of dots carry the fights in a way that, say, the abstract spheres of Deadnaut sadly never did. When things are going are good, watching your team hold ballistic court is a welcome feeling of certainty. When they're bad, the panic rises despite the absence of any sound effects. Taking down a boss monster is often a huge tension breaker. But you probably won't take one down for a while. Mech Engineer describes its battles, not inaccurately, as "semi-auto". Not only are you limited to general "go here" or "focus fire here" orders, but your pilots will frequently ignore your orders. Morons. Half your battle screen is a readout of mech and pilot stats, much like Deadnaut. But even after many hours of play, I've little idea what many of them represent, much less how to prevent or reverse them going in the wrong direction. The battles move too quickly to register most of the feedback, and while I think this is a problem, I kind of understand it. It isn't about controlling your mechs, it's about designing and preparing them for whatever threats you're pitting them against today. Moron mitigation. Starter tips: keep heat down no matter what, and put protection above firepower at first. This was already enough to intrigue me, but Mech Engineer's real standout point is its outfitting. It's here where it uses simulation to establish the atmosphere and sense of responsibility that makes the game work despite its flaws. Long before your pilots can stomp on a giant alien laser sandworm, you have to fit that mech with an engine. That engine won't go in? Of course it won't, you haven't switched it on yet. It won't switch on? Well, you haven't put a piston in it, have you? How's it supposed to fire? Every engine in every mech. Pistons, injectors, the little panel and rod thingies in the nuclear one that I can't remember the name of. Slot 'em all in (you'll research multiple types) and then add your accessories. Experiment a bit to get the balance of pressure vs energy output vs heat tolerance and cooling that you need. Test them then fire them up before putting them in a mech, and then do the same for every weapon. A good mech game lets you mix and match weapons. Mech Engineer lets you configure every individual gun's performance to your liking. Each has 23 pips that can be freely swapped to boost its rate of fire, accuracy, penetration, weight, and energy consumption, plus for a cost can be loaded up with special ammunition (ammo itself is unlimited, but not the refit). A wee monitor above this interface offers a dynamic simulation of your current configuration. You can slide a little target to any range to see exactly how the gun will fare against different armours. The key to much of the game is here. The big guns are always tempting, but maybe this next fight would be better handled by cranking up the rate of fire on dual miniguns? Or you can configure the rocket launcher for low accuracy but triple shots, or reduce the weight of the cannon and load it with incendiaries. Research is simple enough. Gather nerds, point them at my latest crude drawing, and wait a few days. Good job, nerds. A few weapons do dramatically more damage if you simply don't rein in their energy consumption, letting you save up for that expensive high powered engine. But then you have to think about heat generation too, and damn, now you'll have to switch out the motors to less power-thirsty ones. And perhaps those can't support the weight so you'll consider taking off some armour. This next fight won't have many big hitters so maybe that would work... Where Mech Mechanic Simulator was a better simulation of the assembly process, Mech Engineer feels more like, well, what an engineer would be thinking about. The guy on the ship in Mechwarrior or Battletech who directs all the repairs and that. That's you now. But repairs cost resources. Sci-fi metals must be scavenged in missions, or occasionally found as the days pass. You must manufacture everything yourself, which eats them up fast, as do some refits, and most importantly in the long term, repairing and upgrading your base itself. Yep, you have to manage that too. Hydroponics, factories, recycling, hospitals, even a prison. You'll be taking in refugees, some wounded, and hopefully some more researchers and engineers, because every time you order a part, make a change, or even ready a mech to be examined, that takes labour. It's here where Mech Engineer's core design conflict looms. It's by nature a game about experimenting and tweaking, but there's only so much of that your engineers can do in a day before you have to move the day on. It does very little to explain itself, and punishes mistakes long before you figure out what they even are. Worse still, you only get one save. It's auto-save all the way, and everything is final. I acknowledge I've complained about this many, many times before but this one really stings because goddamn is Mech Engineer punishing. You will likely lose all your mechs multiple times before working out the basics, and with almost no explanation from the game at all, you may struggle to figure out how to start a mission at all. Ignoring orders quite often means blundering into whatever the hell this is. It's not good, I know that. The interface is big on dragging things to bays but small on telling you you're supposed to drag things to bays. Documentation has slowly, slowly been coming over the last few months, but it's still a trial and error struggle for a good while just to learn what you're supposed to be doing, let alone how to do it. But the thing is... I've put up with it. I hate games that waste my time, but I don't feel like Mech Engineer is. Part of that is because it's in early access, and I've seen it move gradually towards where it is today. It's at a point where I can write about it somewhat positively, with a very tentative "consider this game" recommendation. But part of it also has me thinking about how games that have fully documented explanations and "how to" text is one of the best things we all take for granted. I want to say, conclu
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While GOG say they "will not tolerate review bombing" Good news! Hitman: Game Of The Year Edition is now on GOG and 70% off. Bad news! The game requires an internet connection for so many singleplayer features that customers on the DRM-free digital store are real mad about it. At the top of Hitman's GOG store page, a note states that an "Internet connection is required to access Escalation missions, Elusive Targets or user-created Contracts. Story and bonus missions can be played offline." Further down the page, a slew of 1/5 star reviews point out that an internet is also required for features such as "unlocking weapons, items, outfits, starting locations and more." GOG's main selling-point as a store is that it offers games in a DRM-free form. If you are opposed to limitations being placed upon software you've legally bought, or worry about long-term ownership in the event of services shuttering, or if you just want to be able to play games without needing an internet connection, then DRM-free is an appealing option. The issue is that an increasing number of technically "DRM-free" games require an internet connection for all kinds of non-obvious features. Hitman among them. The reviews on GOG are alternately cross at Hitman developers IO Interactive for not making better offline options, and cross at GOG for putting Hitman on their supposedly DRM-free store. "The only worthwhile AAA stealth game in years (so long as you disable hints and X-ray vision) but over five years later, IO still refuse to implement a proper offline mode so bare minimum, you don't need to be online to unlock new equipment, starting locations, outfits, etc.," writes user HeavilyAugmented. "In other words, playing the game offline means you never unlock new content and you'll have to start with a default loadout of a regular suit and silenced pistol always." Writing on the store's forum, GOG representative 'chandra' responded to a thread about the complaints: Thank you for bringing this topic to our attention. We’re looking into it and will be updating you in the coming weeks. In case you have pu
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. And rebuilding a futuristic farm Is it still a Zachlike if it's not made by Zachtronics? Because The Signal State sure looks like a Zachlike. It's about solving logic puzzles inspired by modular synthesizers, which means you'll tinker with ornate machinery by twisting knobs and changing wiring. It's also wrapped in a post-apocalyptic story in which your actions will "change th
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. More major multiplayer games for Valve's handheld Valve's claim that the Steam Deck would run every game in your Steam library is looking more and more like fact. Yesterday Easy Anti-Cheat announced support for Linux and the Proton compatibility laters the Deck relies upon. Today, BattlEye Anti-Cheat followed suit, announcing they'd support the Steam Deck and Proton in a twe
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Okay, here we are: it is now autumn. I'm ready. I've folded my summer bedding away, pulled out the big duvet, and bought a bigger Thermos. And this is the nice part of autumn, when things are cosy and transitionary, before the feeling of death sets in. I was cheered by reading about your favourite autumn games this week. But anyway, what are you playing this weekend? Here's what we're clicking on. Alice Bee I am going to play that there Kena: Bridge Of Spirits and have a good fun time in a nice third-person action adventure. Also, I like games that give me cute little best friends so the Rot better be as cute as everyone says. Alice0 I need to plumb the depths of Thatcher's Techbase and ensure Maggie stays securely down in Hell. Colm I often race through games so that I can get onto the next one, but I'm really savouring Deathloop. I probably don't need to tell you how wonderful that game is. However, if I have time – and I'll whisper this in case the PC gods hear – I'm gonna try and sneak in a few hours of Lost Judgment on PS5, too. Shhhh... don't tell anyone. Ed Master Chief called and he wants me to test Halo Infinite, so I better take him up on that. And that's about it, really. Maybe some Antiques Roadshow to round off Sunday? I bet a Covenant rifle would sell for loads. Hayden I want to jump into Diablo 2: Resurrected and Kena: Bridge Of Spirits this weekend, so I'll need to somehow balance slaughtering demons and cuddling the cutest creatures to ever exist. If I don't leave the house at all, maybe I could finish off Deathloop too? Time to close the curtains and get settled in front of my monitor for a healthy weekend binge. Imogen My sister is visiting this weekend specifically because she wants to play some of the old PS2 games we used to obsess over as kids. So, a little Gauntlet: Dark Legacy and Baldur's Gate: Dark Alliance 2 is on the menu. I'm tempted to unplug her controller and try to convince her she's playing with me, you know, for old times sake. James I’m tempted to try Kena: Bridge of Spirits. It looks slightly more twee than I normally go in for, but also like a soothing salve to apply to my shooter-frayed brain. Sable is a looker alright. Katharine ActRaiser is something that's always been on my 'to play' list, and yesterday's surprise announcement of a new re
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Now that's a precision shot Photo modes are undeniably in fashion now, so much so that I've just started assuming most major RPGs and third-person action games will have one built in at launch. I've never put in the time to get particularly skilled at lining up the best shots, but I'm always well impressed by those who do. It's a bummer though when a looker of a game doesn't have a way to really get up close and personal with its pretty cast and environments. Tales Of Arise, which just launched this month, doesn't have one yet, for instance. That's where the extremely nifty and very handy Universal Unreal Engine 4 Unlocker comes in. It's a mod that lets you toggle a free camera to take amazing screenshots in over 300 Unreal Engine games. Naturally, I took UUU for a spin to snap some shots of Tales Of Arise, since I've got it handy. That up top there is Arise's protagonist Shionne using a fire spell during a battle. After a quick and easy setup, UUU allowed me to freeze the game, disable the interface, and navigate around the scene to line up a shot I liked. It also let me advance time by just a few frames at a time so I could walk her through that casting animation to get a decent pose. Although I didn't get that into the weeds, UUU also allows you to use "hotsampling" to dynamically resize your game window to take shots at a higher resolution than your monitor supports. Not bad for an amateur screenshot-taker, if I do say so myself. (Though I clearly forgot to remove her cat ear cosmetic first, sorry.) It doesn't hold a candle to what other folks are able to achieve with UUU though. The mod's creator Frans "Otis_Inf" Bouma has posted lots of his own captures over on Twitter, which you can spot down below. Even more screenshots from the "Framed" Discord server of UUU users can be found in the Hall Of Framed. Some use additional tools like ReShade presets or depth of field changes to take some really wild screenshots, though not all of those are strictly taken with UUU, mind. The version of UUU I used is free to download and take for a spin yourself. If you're really into getting in the thick of it, Bouma has a version with the newest features like a camera track system over on his Patreon. Ta, PC Gamer. #KenaBridgeofSpirits (PC, own Unreal Engine Unlocker for camera/console tweaks/custom lights, Reshade) pic.twitter.com/hn6xDc19iS— Frans Bouma (@FransBouma) September 23, 2021 #TalesofArise (PC, own Unreal Engine Unlocker for camera/console/tweaks, reshade) pic.twitter.com/FhUnQofCQg— Frans Bouma (@FransBouma) September 11, 2021 The Ascent (PC, own unreal engine unlocker for camera & engine tweaks, reshade) pic.twitter.com/7WUUG1nygn— Frans Bouma (@FransBouma) August 7, 2021
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I'm still extra eager to set out on this trail Might And Delight's "tiny Multiplayer Online RPG" Book Of Travels has scheduled itself a new early access launch date after its most recent delay. As M&D previously reassured fans, it is indeed a shorter wait than I'd feared. Their cozy online RPG is now setting out into early access on October 11th, with plans to work towards a full launch in two years. Might And Delight say they've now squashed those three nasty bugs players found during the closed beta and are ready to commit to the mid-October date. They've pulled together a new version of their launch date trailer right here to prove it. Book Of Travels' RPG bits sound inspired by the stuff of pen and paper adventures. You'll create a character with their own quirks and flaws that affect how you'll play. You even have a freewrite text box on your character sheet to spin yourself a nice backstory. The magic of the world is created through special teas and tying knots, a nice and down-to-earth approach over the usual explosive fantasy stuff of other RPGs. The combat sounds high stakes but avoidable, perhaps fitting for a laid-back RPG. M&D lead programmer Jens Berglind got into some conflict specifics back in August during a Nordic Game Conference interview. As a former MMO enjoyer who's lately lost their appetite, I've been quite interested in M&D's take on what Book Of Travels' TMO elements will be like. Book Of Travels will have a symbol-based communciation system rather than text chat and will feature relatively rare meetups between players. It begs comparison to Journey, another beautiful, low pressure exploration game with infrequent player meetings. Even more so, as Thatgamecompany have also tried their hand at a sort of lite MMO. Sky: Children Of The Light is only on phones and Switches so far, so you'll have to forgive me mentioning it, but I've been playing over the last month to see if the mini MMO thing feels like what I want. It does, generally! I'm still a sucker for daily quests and activities and all, but it mostly strips out the need to min-max a character—a practice of hyper optimisation that I've just never had the stomach for in MMOs. I'm quite interested in seeing how M&D's mini MMO differs from TGC's. With at least two on the table, maybe I'll get my wish for tiny MMOs to be the next big thing. One particular online game feature that Book Of Travels is going to adopt is a seasonal structure. They've not gotten deep into specifics on exactly what each season (chapters, M&D are calling them) will contain, but in today's announcement post they do let on two important facts. Chapter Zero will run for the full duration of their early access period, which M&D say they're planning to be two years. It seems like a hefty estimate, though the line between a "full launch" online game that gets updated for years and one which technically begins in early access feels increasingly meaningless anyhow. During that two years, M&D say they're planning to add a slew of features, some of which being playable instruments, trip
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The gloves are coming off Handcop is a work in progress "fist person shooter" that's just as neat as it is horrifying. This wacky prodecurally-animated cop hand has three legs and chest hair for goodness sake. I can't decide if three "legs" is better or worse than three finger "arms". Oh, and of course officier Michael McWrist is running about carrying a giant gun. It's relatively early days for Handcop right now, it sounds like, but its wacky animations are already catching the internet's attention. Developer Jeff Ramos chatted about Handcop with IGN this week after his handsy detective gathered quite a l
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Just imagine the passive-aggressive notes "Dracula and Frankenstein are modern day 20-something flatmates who never
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Dracula is resurrected and so are these Game Boy Advance games Dracula's back from the dead again and so are four Castlevania games from the aughts. Three different vampire stomping adventures originally hailing from the Game Boy Advance—and one SNES—have made their way into a new collection on PC via Steam. Two Belmonts, a Graves, and a Cruz all get their time to shine against those undead baddies in Castlevania: Circle Of The Moon, Harmony Of Dissonance, Aria Of Sorrow, and Dracula X. Konami launched the Castlevania Advance Collection yesterday, complete with some modern conveniences for us PC players i
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Take a look at some fantastic castle ideas that you can build in Minecraft Want to build an epic Castle in Minecraft? H
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Don't leave Teacup, Potion Craft or A Winding Path in too long or the code will go all prune-y I love doing this column because it means a) it is the end of a working week (working hard or hardly working, amiright?) and b) I get to play something nice and (often) small, and usually a bit weird. I am also, as it turns out, really smug about the theme I discovered for this week. Last night I had a bath, so am ideally positioned to extoll the benefits of dunking things in water. May I present to you three brand new indie games: a frog's tea party, a potion workshop and a rainy walk. Potion Craft Who's it by? niceplay games, tinyBuild Where can I get it? Steam (Early Access) How much is it? £11/€12/$15 Potion Craft is another best Steam Fest demos alum now gracing the annals of this column. Out now in early access, it's improved upon the demo a lot (although does still have some kinks that I hope will be worked out before full release). In it, you are a potion seller, who moves into an abandoned shop building and opens it up to start making and selling your wares. People come into the front of house and ask for things. They might need a healing potion for their bad back, a frost potion to freeze a river, or poison - a lot of people ask for poison, actually... You then nip out the back and whip something up in your cauldron using the plants you've harvested from your garden, or bought from passing traders. In an unusual application of design genius, brewing and discovering recipes is played out on a kind of map, and different ingredients will let you travel in different directions. One kind of flower zig zags you to the left, while a funny looking mushroom sends you in loops to the right. You need to avoid hazards, which will fail your potion, and make it to the recipe spot. Getting bang onto it will make a stronger potion. Grinding your ingredients up first will increase their potency - and change or increase how far they travel on the map. You can save recipes so you can instantly brew something you have the ingredients for, but if you've run out then you can do the equivale
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. A new Korean drama that's effectively Battle Royale meets Zero Escape Listen up, escape room fans. There's a new Korean drama you need to watch. It's called Squid Game, it's on Netflix, and it's real good. It's a show about 456 down and outers - folks with no life, family or who are in huge piles of debt - who enter a deadly competition to win a truck ton of money to help them turn their life around. All they need to do is compete in six games. Easy peasy, everyone thinks. How hard can that be? Only the first of those games, a riff on the classic children's game Statues / Grandma's Footsteps / Red Light Green Light - involves running toward a giant automaton with motion sensors in her eyes, as well as a team of snipers waiting in the rafters to take down anyone who does stay perfectly at the right time. It's grim, but it's also the perfect blend of some of my favourite things ever: Zero Escape, Danganronpa and Battle Royale (the Japanese thriller, not the game genre) - and I implore you to give it a go.
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Follow this walkthrough of the Warrior Path to complete the Toshi's Love quest Stuck on the Warrior Path in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? You're not alone. The sheer number of portals and zipping between locations throughout the Warrior Path has led many a player to distraction and frustration. At least, until they found this handy walkthrough, which guides you carefully through every part of the Toshi's Love quest, through every combat area and puzzle, until you reach the end and defeat the Warrior himself. Keep scrolling to read our written and our video walkthrough of the Warrior Path in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits. On this page: Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Warrior Path walkthrough (Toshi's Love quest) Shoot the three crystals in order Reach the top portal The second crystal shooting puzzle Reach the hidden area Reach the bell and defeat the Warrior Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Warrior Path walkthrough (Toshi's Love quest) The Warrior Path in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits is one of three "Path" areas which lie beyond the purple barriers in the Village. These barriers cannot be passed through until you reach the "third act" of the game and gain the Spirit Dash ability. Once you reach this point and you're ready to complete the Toshi's Love quest, head to the southwest barrier at the Docks, and Spirit Dash through it to enter the Warrior Path. Below I'll walk you through everything you must do to reach the end of this path - but if you're more of a visual learner, you can watch the video above which shows me completing every step of this quest on Master level. Shoot the three crystals in order First thing you'll see on the Warrior Path is a giant archway with three crystal statues on top. You must shoot the crystals with your Spirit Bow in the correct order to activate the portal. To find the order, look closely at the stars in the sky just above each statue. You'll see some stars are brighter than the rest, and they'll reveal the following order: Shoot the left crystal; Shoot the right crystal; Shoot the middle crystal. Bear this mechanic in mind, because it reappears in another puzzle late
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Not that we have any clue what the game is yet After rebooting Lara Croft with 2013's Tomb Raider, Square Enix's Crystal Dynamics studio are now helping reboot another vintage hero: Joanna Dark. They'll be chipping in on Microsoft's mysterious new Perfect Dark, helping out the mysterious Santa Monica studio named The Initiative. Secrecy might be thematically appropriate for a game about a futuristic superspy but we don't know much of anything about it so all you can really say is "Yup, I guess they're doing that." When Microsoft announced the resurrection of Perfect Dark in December 2020, they didn't have much to say about it, simply saying it's "a secret agent thriller set in a near-future world". Apparently the world was mucked up by ecological disasters then megacorps stepped in to rebuild and it turns out megacorps are bad? I'd assume it's a first-person shooter still, but who knows. It does have guns, at least. Look, you can see one in the picture for today's team-up announcement: Perfect Dark update! We are partnering with Crystal Dynamics, the world class team behind character-driven games such as Tomb Raider, to bring this first-person spy thriller to a new generation. pic.twitter.com/EiqjU99wMa— TheInitiative (@TheInitiative) September 24, 2021 "The teams couldn't pass up a chance to work together," The Initiative added. "We're still early in development, but incredibly excited to use this unique opportunity to deliver on the vision for Perfect Dark!" It is unusual to see a studio owned by Squeenix collaborate with a Microsoft studio in this way but hey, I assume something secret is going on. Initiative studio head Darrell Gallagher was previously the head of Crystal Dynamics so perhaps he's getting the crew back together for one last heist. Perfect Dark was created for the Nintendo 64 by Rare, who are also part of Microsoft these days. They released a prequel on Xbox 360 in 2005 and the first game was remasted for 360 in 2010,
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. It's all very silly. Having survived the grey, po-faced gruntman domination of the 2000s, I love that games can still be very silly. Metal Dogs is a twin stick (sort of) shooter about sending heavy weapons platforms into irradiated future deserts to fight giant insects, ghost tanks, and robot hippos. Naturally, those heavy weapons platforms are strapped onto dogs.
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Installing RAM is both one of the easiest steps to building a PC and one of the simplest ways to upgrade an existing gaming rig. In a physical sense, anyway. Just like installing an M.2 SSD, there are no power or data cables to worry about, and as long as your RAM sticks fit the RAM slots on your motherboard, ultimately you just need to push them in. There is room for error, though, hence why this article is going to continue beyond the introductory paragraph. See? RAM can be interesting. Before getting into the hands-on stuff, let’s start by making sure you have the right memory. At the time of writing, that almost definitely means DDR4 in standard DIMM format: this is the RAM type supported by all recent Intel and AMD deskto
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Humans are boring. All fleshy and feelings and Netflix. Like this quiz, robots don't have hidden agendas. Robots want to wish Paulie a happy birthday, and we want to entertain you for quarter of an hour. It's the perfect match. For this week's Mystery Steam Reviews both myself and Matthew had to choose three games have robot protagonists (or protagonists that have robot limbs or protagonists that ride around on mechs). Basically, if the game has a robot in it that you can control in some way, it was fair game. If you're new around these parts, you can see a full breakdown of the rules in the Mystery Steam Reviews Rule Bible™ below. Also, remember to boast about getting all six right in the comments. If you like this, then you may very well enjoy this week's episode of The PC Gaming Weekspot. We chatted about how good Deathloop is, I told Matthew about my time with Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, and we talked about that leaked Nvidia GeForce Now list. While you're here, why not have a lo
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The highest difficulty level is named "Austerity" Following a short delay caused by Tennent's Lager (actual true story), Margaret Thatcher has returned from Hell to menace us once more. Thankfully, one doomed space marine will stand up and venture into the tenth circle of Hell (aka the UK) to put the reviled British prime minister down for good. Thatcher's Techbase is its name, and Doom 2 is the game you'll need to play this free mod now it's out. It is quite the thing, and even has a custom soundtrack from Paradise Killer's composer. The new campaign sends us into a Hell festooned with Union Flag bunting to battle incarnations of Margaret Thatcher. Various demons wear her face, and the whole place is crammed with familar political posters and slogans, wee milk cartons replacing health potions (yes, absolutely the game says you "snatch" them), Silk Cut and Regal King Size cigarettes, and other cultural touchstones. Something it no longer features is Scotland's own Tennent's Lager. Instead, enjoy a delicious can of... Fennent's Lager, maybe? Mod director Jim Purvis explained on Twitter today that the Tennent's lawyers reached out this morn, asking him to remove their beer cans, which caused a wee last-minute delay to the launch. In return, they'll make a donation to the charities and organisations he suggests players help out. These include the Scottish Refugee Council, Stonewall, and the Hillsborough Justice Campaign, which Thatcher would surely hate, so that's good. "I know, I know - artistic integrity, parody work, not-for-profit, bla bla bla. I agree," Purvis added. "But if it gets
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ActRaiser Renaissance is a "complete graphical overhaul" What's up 90s kids, how would you like to jump back into a SNES platforming city-builder that was first released 30 years ago? Last night's Nintendo Direct had a surprising amount of PC news on offer, including the announcement that a remake of ActRaiser is available to play on PC right now. Named ActRaiser Renaissance, Square Enix say they've given the game a "complete graphical overhaul", as well as added some new features for players to try. Who knew 2021 would be the year we all flew back in time? Last week we got more Outcast and Jagged Alliance, now this. ActRaiser first launched for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1990. It plonks players into a world where a godlike being named The Master must fight his way through evil beings who've taken out civilisations. That's where the city-building comes in, you'll get to create and manage settlements to protect, you know, when you're not jumping around bopping bad guys. Square Enix say the remaster adds more detail to environments, characters, monsters and more, improving the 2D visuals. It also has new city-building segments and a new region, as well as a remastered soundtrack with 15 new songs. You can toggle back and forth to the old soundtrack if you'd like though. On top of that, there's a new RTS game mode too, Settlement Siege, in which you'll need to make deci
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Use these Minecraft tower ideas to create a stunning skyline Looking for a cool tower to build in Minecraft? This list is filled with exciting tower ideas that you can try out in Minecraft, with everything from a simple base to a magical Wizard tower. Take a look through all of these suggestions to get inspired, or follow along with one of the videos and get building right now! Minecraft tower ideas: Medieval tower Big Ben Simple tower Avengers tower Castle tower Wizard tower Paw Patrol Headquarters Me
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Where to find the Crystal Shards you need to craft new items in Hearth & Home Where do you get Crystal Shards in Valheim, and what are they used for? Crystal has existed as a resource in Valheim for a while, but like many crafting materials in this Early Access cult hit, it's only recently been given a use. The Hearth & Home update has added Crystal Battleaxe and Crystal Wall recipes, and now this previously purely decorative resource is in high demand. In this Valheim Crystals guide, we tell you how to get Cryst
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. How to solve the Incense Pots puzzle at the end of the Mask Maker Path Wondering how to solve the Incense Pots puzzle in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? If you've followed the Mask Maker path as part of the Toshi's Fear quest and you're stuck on these infernal Incense Pots, you've come to exactly the right place. There's not much to say here, so let's jump right into our walkthrough
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Where to find Thunder Stones, how to craft the Obliterator, and what it does once you have it. How do you craft and use the Obliterator in Valheim? The Obliterator was added to Valheim with the Hearth & Home update, and exists to address a recurring problem experienced by Valheim players in older iterations of the Early Access smash hit. Previously, there was no way to actually get rid of items you didn't need — which could include a surplus of crafting materials and even trophies made from the body parts of slain enemies. The Obliterator gives you the option to neatly dispose of all the inventory junk you don't want to display or store. On this page: How to craft an Obliterator in Valheim Where to get Thu
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Rise is still vaguely slated for a PC launch in early 2022 Though Monster Hunter Rise isn't even out on PC for months yet, Capcom have announced an expansion is coming our way. During last night's Nintendo Direct stream they revealed Monter Hunter Rise: Sunbreak, which will launch simultaneously on Switch and PC in summer 2022. Hey, at least that means while consoleers had to wait over a year for the expansion, we'll have it after only a few months. Have a peek in the announcement trailer. Capcom say Sunbreak has "an eerie new setting" with "an all-new storyline with m
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It's coming next month, but there's a demo you can play today Nier director Yoko Taro is making a new role-playing game in which everything is depicted through cards, and somehow it's not called Yoko Tarot. Story? There are cards for that. Combat? Turn-based card battles, of course. Travelling through the world? Flip over some cards, see what you find! It's called Voice Of Cards: The Isle Dragon Roars, and it's set to release this October. On top of that, a demo will be available later today if you fancy trying it out. I'm immediately drawn to the gorgeous cards you can see in the trailer below. There's some really lovely artwork here, I wonder if they'll end up making physical versions. Voice Of Car
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Rise, brothers, to venerate Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine as it celebrates its tenth birthday this month. Relic Entertainment and Sega have a surprise for us all too, turning the third-person ork-smasher into an 'Anniversary Edition' which includes all the DLC as well as bonuses like the soundtrack. That's all for free, which is nice. The Anniversary Edition announcement lists all everything thrown in: basically, a few weapons then a load of stuff for the multiplayer mode, including chapter skins and maps and the opportunity to become a Dreadnought. On the shinies side, you also get the full soundtrack, wallpapers, a ringtone, and other bits and pieces. Space Marine captured quite how chunky and absurd the holy warriors are, ab
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Multiplayer games just got a lot more Deck-friendly The Steam Deck has just broken through a major compatibility barrier: one that would have made it difficult for some of Steam’s most-played multiplayer games to properly function on the Valve handheld. Gabe and co. have Epic to thank for this one, though, as the latter’s Easy Anti-Cheat (EAC) tech is now extending support to Linux and it Wine and Proton compatibility layers. The same layers, you may recall, that the Steam Deck relies on to run games without native Linux ports. In other words, games with multiplayer c
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Learn how to find Slimes and make a Slime Farm in Minecraft Want to know how to find Slimes in Minecraft? Slimes can vary in size from annoying little blobs to giant monstrosities, but there’s one thing they all have in common. They all drop Slimeballs, which are extremely useful in Minecraft. This guide will take you through everything that you need to know about Slimes, including how to find them, what you can use Slimeballs for, and how to make your own Slime farm. On this page: How to find Slimes in Minecraft How to use a Minecraft Slime Chunk finder How to use Slimeballs in Minecraft How to make a Slime Farm in Minecraft How to find Slimes in Minecraft You’ll know when you’re near a Slime, as
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And a child-eating cannon Fuga: Melodies Of Steel is set during an anthropomorphic animal anime World War 2 in which your parents have been taken by the dog Nazis. Still with me? You and your fellow cat children find Howl's Moving Tank in a cave and set about getting your families back, with turn-based, RPG battles. You also discover at the end of the tutorial that your giant angry house has a "Soul Cannon", which is a gun that only fires if you feed it the soul - and permanently kill - one of the children. Still with me? I'm enjoying it so far. During battles, you choose which children to place at which gun position, and each kid brings their own particular weapon and skills. Battles play out on a time
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Breaking news: everything is normal and fine. Yesterday Halo Infinite developers 343 Industries mentioned during a livestream that they might need to delay this weekend's beta. Today they confirmed that's not the case, and posted an overview of what to expect. The test overview breaks down what times the beta will launch, but also during what times individual modes or matchmaking will be available. This image covers the basics: Here are the times in text form, including for BST timezones: BST Friday 24th September - 6pm to 10pm, then Saturday 25th September 1am to 5am Saturday 25th
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The riot shield was probably the most divisive item ever added to Counter-Strike - and now it's back. New update Operation Riptide, out now, introduces the defensive item to Counter-Strike: Global Offensive's casual mode, alongside major tweaks to Dust2, new missions, shorter matches, and private matchmaking queues. Ballistic shields were introduced to CS:GO's Danger Zone mode back in 2019, but Danger Zone is a very different beast. Now they're usable by counter-terrorists in casual hostage rescue matches, meaning you can use them in maps like you could back in the original Counter-Strike. The riot shield provides protection from bullets when held in front of you. When put away, it moves onto your back, and provides protectio
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A lot like old times, but the wrong old times Diablo 2: Resurrected launched earlier today, offering players the chance to relive the classic hack-and-slasher. But why recreate the experience of one Diablo game when you could recreate the experience of two? Resurrected is also experiencing a bunch of launch issues related to its online mode, just like Diablo 3 before it. Those issues include players being unable to see their existing characters, create new characters, or launch the game. Some might say essential features. Reports of characters being "deleted" started to appear on Reddit not long after launch. In most of the accounts, players would restart the game for one reason or another - often because t
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Turns out an old game still feels old sometimes Terrible news continues to pour out of Blizzard like pus from of a festering wound around a splinter you forgot about and left for way too long. You should really get that looked at. Still, they must be drawing some comfort from the fact that Diablo II: Resurrected is out today, one of Blizz's most beloved games of all time. Naturally, a lot of people will be excited for the remastered version. But if my tone is more immediately aggro than the last time I wrote about Diablerrected, that's because I was previously playing the beta through the rose-tinted haze of this game being very important to me and a big part of my childhood, and bonding with my older brother,
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. And tweak weapon balance too, I guess, whatever The primary function of ragdoll physics in video games, everyone knows, is to freak out and make people laugh. Everyone knows this. The technology was created explicitly to bring a subversive touch of merry mayhem to po-faced murdergames. Everyone knows this. But developers are wary of overdoing it or openly acknowledging this fact which everyone knows. This is why, sadly, Call Of Duty: Vanguard will indeed 'fix' the 'bug' which could make attack dogs turn into a giant maelstrom of limbs, teeth, and mashing meat noises, a phe
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It’s funny to think how different the use cases are for setting up two monitors for your gaming PC, compared to setting up three. A trio of displays lets you play in ultrawide with a wraparound effect that even most purpose-built ultrawide monitors can’t match, but while you can configure a dual-monitor setup to run games across displays, it doesn’t make nearly as much sense. With the borders of each screen running straight down the middle, most of the best ultrawide PC games would be nigh-unplayable. Still! If you can budget for it, two remains better than one. It’s an expanded but focused setup for when you’re playing a full-screen game but also want a browser tab, video, or streaming controls visible at the same time. Another benefit of using two monitors, even over three, is that you have much greater flexibility to mix and match the best gaming monitors. Triple-screen ultrawide play works best when they’re all of the same size, but if you commit to a dual-screen setup where only one screen is for games and the other is for just about anything else, you can pick and choose any sizes, resolutions and even orientations you want. Two identical displays? That works just dandy, but the steps below will apply to any combination, regardless of mismatched proportions and pixel densities, or even if you’ve turned one monitor sideways into portrait mode. You can also follow them to add a second monitor to a gaming laptop, provided yours has a spare display output. Here’s how to set up two monitors for gaming and multitasking: Step 1: Get two monitors. Again, these don’t need to be the same ma
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Looking for the best classes and builds in Diablo 2: Resurrected? The shiny new remaster is finally here, but the gameplay of Diablo 2: Resurrected will be very familiar to veterans. If you’re playing for the first time, however, the game’s complex character progression can seem overwhelming. The foundations of your experience are your choice of class, and the skill(s) you build around on that class. Each of Diablo 2’s seven classes features multiple talent trees that grant you new abilities and define how you approach the game. If you’re planning to play on Hardcore mode or push deep into Hell difficulty, you will want a quality build. Blizzard has not made balance adjustments to Diablo 2: Resurrected, so the long-established meta still holds in the remaster. Prepare for Hell with our guide to the best classes and builds in Diablo 2: Resurrected. Here are the best classes in Diablo 2: Resurrected: Paladin Sorceress Necromancer Amazon Druid Assassin Barbarian Paladin - Best class in Diablo 2: Resurrected With his holy magic and powerful auras, the Paladin is an incredibly powerful character both solo and in a party. Paladins have the luxury of both high damage and high defenses, easily picking up huge resists and max block chance (75%) with some help from their skill tree. As a result, Paladins boast two of the best builds in the game. Hammerdin The famous Hammerdin is considered by some to be the best all-around build in Diablo 2. This build maxes out the Blessed Hammer skill, which hurls magical hammers that spiral out around the Paladin. Hammerdin can clear monster packs with ease and deal with bosses effectively. Plus, the build
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Diablo 2's Runewords are a key component of the gear system - here's how they work Trying to wrap your head around Runes in Diablo 2: Resurrected? Runes are the cornerstone of Diablo 2’s gear system. As there are no balance changes in Diablo 2: Resurrected, longtime players will be familiar. If you’re new, however, this system will look entirely unfamiliar, even if you’ve played Diablo 3 or Path of Exile. There’s nothing quite like Diablo 2’s Rune system in the ARPG genre. If you’re having trouble wrapping your head around the quirks of Runes and Runewords, we’re here to help. Runes Explained In Diablo 2, many gear pieces will drop with one or more sockets. You can fill those sockets with Gems, Jewels, and Runes. Each of these socketable items provides different stat bonuses depending on the type of gear they are socketed into. Runes, however, have some additional properties that make them uniquely powerful. Runes in Diablo 2 each have names, like Nef, Tal, or Shael. On their own, Runes provide stat bonuses to gear. However, combining certain Runes in the correct order on normal rarity gear will transform the item into a powerful Runeword. These potent items carry over some of their base stats and take on the properties of the Runeword embedded within. Runewords can ONLY be created from normal (white name) quality items with EXACTLY the required number of sockets to create the word. For example: take a normal scimitar with two sockets and insert the Runes Tir and El to create the Steel Runeword. This version of Steel you’ve created will keep the base stats (damage, attack speed, attribute requirements) of the scimitar, and gain: 20% Enhanced Damage +3 to Minimum Damage +3 to Maximum Damage +50 to Attack Rating (chance to hit) 50% chance of Open Wounds 25% increased Attack Speed +2 Mana on kill +1 Light Radius As you can see, this is a massive power upgrade over a basic Scimitar. Steel in particular is a great early game Runeword, as the bleed effect from Open Wounds provides a lot of free damage that will scale with your character’s level. Runewords create
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Find the best spot to hunt down items and experience in Diablo 2's endgame Looking for the best farming spots in Diablo 2? An ARPG would be nothing without a grind. The grind in Diablo 2 is the foundation of the genre’s last 20 years. The genre-defining classic has seen very few changes for the remastered version, Diablo 2: Resurrected, so veterans of the original will have their strategies in place. If you’re a new player looking to optimize your character after beating the game though, you’ll need to know where to farm your gear. First, a quick explanation of how these zones have been selected. Zones in Diablo 2, like in most ARPGs, have an area level. Most monsters in that area will be at the area level, while Champion and Boss monster packs will be one and two levels higher, respectfully. The highest area level in Diablo 2 is 85. Monsters in level 85 areas have a chance to drop any item in the game. So, players looking to farm top-end gear will pick a level 85 area that suits their build, load up on magic-find, and go to town. Our list includes every level 85 area in Diablo 2: Resurrected, plus a couple of other areas you might target before deep endgame. Here’s every level 85 area
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Sit. Stay. Good listener. This week on The Electronic Wireless Show podcast I was inspired by the extremely cute little monsters the Rot, who are you besties in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, to ask Matthew and Nate about their favourite animal companions in video games. You will probably be able to predict some of their answers. Others, not so much. A big digression about trains and commuter rage this week, as well as a shocking update from Matthew re. the farewell fizzy drink tour. But most exciting is that the Cavern Of Lies is replaced this week by a Cavern Of Announcements! Yes, we have very special news indeed, and you have to listen to at least two thirds of the podcast to find out what it is. But it is genuinely incredible. You can listen on Spotify, or above, or go straight to Soundcloud where you can download it for later. You can also now discuss the episode on our Discord channel, which has a dedicated room for podcast chat. You can also get the RSS feed here or find it on iTunes, Stitcher or Pocket Casts. Music is by Jack de Quidt who is very kind to animals. Don't forget to buy your Cavern Of Lies t-shirt. Links Nate likes the robot horses in Horizon Zero Dawn, leading to a discussion about whether Cortana from Halo is an animal companion (we decide no, but that she would be if she chose an animal shape to appear in instead of being a naked woman). Far Cry 5 has a nice dog. Nate has used hundreds of captive tortoises as a defensive line in RimWorld. He also explains some of the terrifying pets one can have in Dwarf Fortress (see: The Basement of Curiosity). Matthew, predictably, mentions Sir Lora the Squirrel in Divinity: Original Sin II, as well as your excellent horse pal Roach from The Witcher 3. Recommendations this week are the South Korean survival horror show Squid Game, Italian rock band (and Eurovision winners) Måneskin, and the Vtech Kidizoom, a camera for your young children so they can take terrifying photos of pigs. Congratulations and thanks to Apex Legends for being awarded the first and only RPS Big Oats Award.
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Where to find Tar for crafting Darkwood items in the Hearth & Home update. Where can you find Tar Pits in Valheim? Tar is a new resource introduced in Valheim's Hearth & Home update. It's a versatile crafting resource that you'll need before you can make many of the update's new items, including Darkwood furniture and building materials, Raven and Wolf Adornments, and — last but never least — the hot tub. On this page: Where to find Tar Pits in Valheim How to gather Tar in Valheim How to craft with Tar in Valheim Where to find Tar Pits in Valheim Tar Pits are exclusively found in the Plains biome, which is the fifth and (currently) final biome you should expect to explore in the latest Early Access iteration of the game. However, before you hare off into one of the most dangerous parts of the map, it's worth noting that Tar Pits won't spawn in any area you'd already uncovered prior to updating the game with Hearth & Home. Valheim's developers have strongly recommended starting a new save to play with the new features, and this is one of the reasons why. Tar Pits are fairly easy to spot when you come across one. The land in the Plains biome is dominated by golden-green grassland, and Tar Pits stand out as a dark brown spot on the landscape with (of course) a pit of black liquid in the centre. How to gather Tar in Valheim Before you can collect any Tar, you might have to deal with some Growths. Growths are a new enemy type that spawn exclusively around Tar Pits, but you may recognise them as they're very similar to the Blobs you fight in the Swamp biome: they have a similar leaping attack and also inflict a Poison effect. The best way to dispatch them is with flaming arrows: Growths are resistant to piercing damage but weak to fire, and it's safer to take them out from a distance rather than letting them surround you. Defeated Growths drop a little Tar, which at least makes up for your trouble. Once you've dealt with the Growths, your Tar farming operations can begin in earnest. You can harvest Tar by simply picking it up from resource nodes found around the Tar Pits.
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Darling it's better down where it's wetter A new Sea Of Thieves content update heralds the start of a new season today, encouraging pirates to plunge overboard and explore the beautiful halls and mysteries of the Sunken Kingdom. All sorts of coral-y PvE surprises await, with Shrines to quietly explore and Treasures to plunder by force. As beautiful as the game's water is from above, I'm very keen to see more from below. So, Shrines are the gentler addition for people who'd rather not fuss with the game's still
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The wildest bait and switch moves you ever did see Ever since Chorus first broke out of hyperspace during Microsoft's Xbox Series X showcase last year, Fishlabs' enigmatic space shooter has been a tricky thing to pin down. The first trailer gave us a taste of its high speed combat and third-person battles, but its deep, ominous narration, hints of a mysterious cosmic power, and that final image of a planet being sucked into a black hole almost looked like it was verging into horror territory rather than plain sci-
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Following the deaths of popular music bots Groovy and Rythm Discord has started testing official YouTube integration, rolling out a new feature named Watch Together which, well, allows users watch YouTube vids together. It comes just a few weeks after Google's lawyers shut down several third-party Discord bots with a similar function. Watch Together has reportedly been enabled in a limited number of Discord servers for now, with plans to roll it out to everyone by the end of October. According to The Verge, the feature first began testing last year before returning now as Watch Together. They say Discord have re-prioritised it due to the recent music bot shutdowns. You can test Watch Together right now in the Discord Game Lab server. An announcement there says it's currently in the "experimentation phase", and there are channels to provide feedback on the feature if you fancy giving it a go. To try it, hop into a voice channel and select "start an activity", near the button you'd click to stream your screen. From there, you can select Watch Together and create a playlist of YouTube vids (by searching YouTube or pasting links) that folks in the same channel as you can watch at the same time. Bear in mind that you might see YouTube ads, however. The Verge says Watch Together is only available in certain Discord friends and family servers for now, and will be followed by a larger beta in the coming weeks. They claim that Discord plan on launching the feature for everyone by the end of October. It seems like a decent enough replacement for the excellent music bots, Groovy and Rythm, I suppose. They allowed Discord users to listen to music together by playing songs from the likes of YouTube or Spotify. Unfortunately, Google filed a cease and desist notice claiming Groovy was violating their terms of service by "modifying the service and using it for commercial purposes", so the bot-makers shut it down. I'm still gutted that Groovy isn't around anymore. We still have a channel in the main Discord server I frequent titled "DJ Requests", full of memories of the dumb songs my friends and I would get Groovy to play to annoy each other. One of my mates tried to put a song request in just the other day (we were after the Pirates Of The Caribbean soundtrack for reasons I ca
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We chat to Arise producer Yusuke Tomizawa about the series’ new start Bandai Namco's first Tales Of game, Tales Of Phantasia, weighed in at a previously unheard of 48MB when it released in 1995. That's a mere wisp of data nowadays, but a veritable beast for a Super Famicom game cartridge. The cost of these high capacity carts, combined with westerners' ho-hum attitude towards RPGs at the time, likely axed any chance it had of being translated. Later Tales games have had better success in the west - 2003's Tales Of Symphonia was arguably its first breakout hit outside Japan - but the series as a whole has always seemed to exist on the fringes of the JRPG dynasty. While the Tales games certainly have a following outside Japan, western JRPG fans still tend to gravitate toward Square Enix's Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest games, or Atlus' Persona series. But the Tales series' low-key existence is seemingly coming to an end thanks to the recently released Tales Of Arise. With its bright, eye-catching visuals and its uniquely frantic battle system, it turns monster slaying from a chore into an addiction, and has won the hearts of many curious newcomers in the process (including yours truly). With this influx of new blood, Tales might stand a chance of grabbing a throne at the heart of the JRPG genre. I recently talked to Arise producer Yusuke Tomizawa, who worked hard to tailor the adventure for a new Tales audience as much as its established fans. He explains how Arise's development went down a long, risky road, but it paid off in excellent review scores, happy fans, and a refreshing new directi
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Here's how to activate the Power Crystals to open the Storehouse Door Puzzled about how to open the Storehouse Door in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? The smallest area of the game, the Storehouse, is also one of the more confusing and puzzle-dense areas of the world - and the confusion isn't helped by the fact that you've just been given a new power and must quickly learn how it works in order to get through the Storehouse in one piece. Below we'll walk you through exactly how to activate the two Power Crystals and open the Storehouse Door in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits. You'll find both a written and a video walkthrough of the Storehouse puzzle below, so what are you waiting for? Let's dive in. How to open the Storehouse Door in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits After freeing Taro's spirit in the first "act" of the game, Kena is tasked with finding and helping a legendary Woodsmith on the western side of the Kena: Bridge Of Spirits map. To get there, she first has to get through the Storehouse and open the door to the other side. Thankfully in the Storehouse she meets a spirit called Hana, a close friend of the Woodsmith, who shows Kena how to summon and use a Spirit Bomb to activate the old technology in the Storehouse. For more information on the Spirit Bomb, check out our Kena: Bridge Of Spirits abilities walkthrough. To open the Storehouse Door, you must first activate two Power Crystals on the raised platf
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The game has been wobbly since the Evolution update If you've tried to play Apex Legends over the last week or so and noticed that things have been pretty slow, you're not alone. Since the game's Evolution Collection event launched last week, the battle royale and its servers have been struggling, and Respawn Entertainment have been tinkering away to try and sort it all out. Yesterday, they issued a patch to resolve a number of bugs and improve stability, but having played a few matches myself last night, it seems we're not out of the woods just yet. Shortly after the new Evolution event went live, Respawn tweeted that players were struggling to load into lobbies. A few hours later they thought they'd managed to resolve the issue, then realised something was still broken, before claiming they'd fixed it again. But this was just the start of a week's worth of problems. The server issues persisted over the next few days and into the weekend. The devs said that an "unusual amount of players" were timing out when trying to load into lobbies, and, as one of those players, it was rather annoying. I could get into Apex's menu screen alright, though the load times were a little higher than usual. But after joining with my pals, it was a gamble as to who'd receive a server time out and get booted to the home screen before we could load into a match. Respawn tried "ramping up" their server capacity, but at the weekend they were still seeing "roughly three times the normal rate of disconnect errors." Fast forward to Monday this week, and they released another patch aimed at fixing teleporting, packet loss and lag. They also advised players to remove any animated banner poses they had equipped, which was linked to a crash issue. The crashes should be resolved now though, because last night they released another client-side patch to fix numerous bugs and disconnect problems. They also pushed some server-side changes that should've helped with any poor performance players were experiencing. Alas, I played some Apex last night, and it did not feel fixed. When I first launched it after these changes my entire game looked like it was running in slow motion. My framerate had died a death, and my game was properly chugging - and this was in the menu screen! I hadn't even tried getting into a match. It took restarting my PC to make the game playable, but even after that I suffered from a bit of lag. I'm not the only one struggling either, a number of players have reported that they're still experiencing disconnects, getting stuck in endless matchmaking queues, and seeing similar FPS issues as myself. It's a shame when this sort of thing goes on for so long. Apex is one of my go-to social games in the evening, so here's hoping things start to improve more soon. At the very least, Respawn have extended the amount of time players can jump into the battle royale's ranked maps. You know, if you can find a game in the first place.
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The dastardly multiplayer invasions of Deathloop are some murderous hijinks. But not everybody wants to see a player-controlled assassin with vicious human instincts pop up as they sneak through their time loop adventure. That's fine, say developers Arkane, you can simply switch to single player mode, which will replace player incursions with periodic visits from an NPC Julianna who is (let's be diplomatic) a less feisty opponent. I am here to ask, nay, beg: do not do this. Leave it in Online mode. Welcome malice, embrace pain, receive with warmth that sudden mortal stab in the back. You are strong and capable of overcoming such things. I'm not just giving you an ego boost here. As the tenacious Colt, the fight is fixed in your favour. In the excellent single player story, Julianna remarks how the infinitely recurring Colt only needs to get things right once, yet his Eternalist enemies have to stop him millions of times, every time. The same feeling extends to multiplayer, where Julianna's frailty is clear and purposeful. For starters, Colt has two extra lives while Julianna has zero respawns. You're already tougher. Equip the right trinkets and slabs (like the Shift power and speedy sprint trinket) and you can easily become faster too. Invading Juliannas will often spend the opening minutes of a foray just looking for their quarry, or setting up an ambush. But not if you find her first. You're hesitant. I understand. Being invaded as a relaxed enjoyer of single player games is like receiving a hefty dose of horse stimulant in the middle of a silent art gallery. But that sudden spike of adrenaline can spark a sense of focus and grit. You're forced to play slightly differently. As soon as I hear Julianna's taunts on the intercom, I stop whatever I'm doing to go sort out the antenna. Because, aha, killing Julianna isn't even necessary to complete your objectives, you only have to escape safely into the tunnels. Arkane's dense, intricate level design means that an exit is never far away. You can make it. Even if you don't like the shooting match that often results from an invasion, you can still play this game of hide and seek. Keep moving. The tension of the hunt is its own reward. Or you can always sprint as fast as possible towards your rat tunnel, kicking and shoving every enemy along the way, in a bid to swiftly escape with whatever loot you've attained. Slipping away from a wolfish Julianna is sometimes more satisfying than gunning her down. And you know what? In Online mode, it won't always be another player anyway. NPC Jules still shows up from time to time. Part of the secret sauce is you won't know whether this invader is a human maniac with proximity mines and a lust for blood, or a slightly wobbly AI with a cute habit of getting stuck on world geometry and loudly broadcasting her position with grumbles and swear words. You can figure it out, of course, especially in the NPC Julianna's dottery moments. But that initial feeling of unease is a potent spice. Just the possibility that this is a human, with unpredictable behaviour and familiarity with the maps, is enough
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Splendid snowy survival sandbox The Long Dark will launch the much-anticipated fourth episode of its story campaign on the 6th of October, developers Hinterland Studio have announced. Named 'Fury, Then Silence', episode 4 of the 'Wintermute' campaign sees one of our protagonists captured by murderers sheltering from the strange superfreeze in a prison complex. Have a peek at that in the new trailer below. "A murderous gang of convicts has captured Mackenzie," Hinterland explained yesterday. "Desperate to escape one of the darkest corners of Great Bear Island, he must somehow survive his fiercest enemy yet. Can Mackenzie recover th
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No external GPU support, though While Valve haven't been overly secretive with the Steam Deck, there are still plenty
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Previously due this month, now due ??? Fantasy sports management sim Blood Bowl 3 is delayed again, with the early access launch now pushed out of September and into the nebulous future. The official word is that after beta feedback, they realised yeah it wasn't ready. They say, "our teams are more committed than ever to make Blood Bowl 3 the most comprehensive and polished instalment in the series yet." Yeah go on, please do that. Blood Bowl 3 is Cyanide Studio's third
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Brew yourself a cup of something special Step on in and please don't mind the badly-labelled vials I've left lying a
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As you might expect from a game set on a desert planet, Sable has a lot of sand. You traverse it on your floating motorbike as the titular character, a young woman who's part of a nomadic culture where adolescents leave home to complete their Gliding. During this gap year of sorts, the Glider does odd jobs and explores the world until they figure out what they want to be for the rest of their life. Sand is a feature. But as they say, sand is coarse and rough and irritating, and it gets everywhere. Each individual grain of sand is small, but a pinch of sand in your bed will change how you feel about your entire sleep experience. There are an unfortunate number of small, annoying things in Sable that add up to a constant grate on your skin. Which is itself annoying, because large swathes of Sable are good. It looks as fabulous in the flesh as it did in those early trailers and animated GIFs, with an art style inspired by European comics and particularly the artist Moebius. The world is traced in delicate, almost wire-frame lines, and there is a continuous day and night cycle. As you explore and map the various areas of your desert home, you see the world around you take on a different character at different times of day. At night, with everything bathed in a blue-grey wash, I drove directly into the moonrise at the same time as coming upon a graveyard of wrecked spaceships. It was eerie - creepy, almost - and alien. In the day, those same ships turned out to be a mix of rusted metal and bright colours, and the whole place felt more mundane. There are a lot of appreciably weird bits like that in Sable. Lots of big strange statues, a fossilised forest, a landscape of what look like dragon skeletons, and a whole area of deep valleys around a group of towering rock spires. Among it all you'll find the scattered remains of an ancient civilisation that predates yours, with huge mechanisms that you can still use today. There are also more of those wrecked ships scattered around, for you to break into and strip of scrap metal. They're almost puzzle-dungeons, where you have to turn on different switches and get over moving platforms to find breadcrumbs about a disaster that happened hundreds of years ago. Sable's environmental storytelling is subtle and the writing in general is great. At heart, it's a neat story about self-discovery, and you get little titbits about that from most people you meet. Sable herself could easily be a blank slate on which you could write your own feelings, but in dialogue with other characters you get snatches of Sable's inner thoughts, and descriptions of how she feels about certain people, places and things. She's smart and a bit sarcastic, and I like her. I had an impetus to make the right decision for her at the end of her Gliding. Which is a shame, because by the time it got to that point I just couldn't be arsed. Sable is a game that doesn't want to hold your hand. It gives you a hoverbike and an open skyline and says: "There you go. Do your Gliding, then." But your bike is rubbish and the other tools you get to explore don't really help. Your bike is
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Time-looping murder puzzle Deathloop sure seems like it's worth putting on repeat. For all the usual action romp reasons that Arkane are good with, but also for some of its sillier bits. Kicking baddies off ledges sounds like it's the real backbone of Deathloop's comedy. Colt has one damn powerful boot and, according to a new chat with Deathloop director Dinga Bakaba, it's all thanks to Arkane's choice to scrap most of their melee combat system. Here's why Colt traded arm day for leg day. In a new chat with Noclip, Bakaba talks
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. The appeals phase has certainly begun The legal battle between Epic Games and Apple continues as it seems that both are probably willing to cut the proverbial Fortnite baby in half. Earlier this month, the court ruled that Apple must allow third-party payment systems, which was apparently not enough for Epic, who decided to submit an appeal last week. Now, Apple have inform
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Lots of good sci-fi has made up languages, but I don't think many could claim their fictional languages were developed through song. Enter Jett: The Far Shore. It's an upcoming interstellar adventure made by Sword & Sworcery developers Superbrothers with Pine Scented Software, in which a team of scouts take off in their jetts to explore an uncharted planet. Better yet, it features its very own language that sound designer Priscilla Snow developed after finding meaning in the gibberish words she used to form the game's music. While the initial plan was never to have their own in-game language, the Jett team now have a dictionary around 2000 words strong, and I had a chance to talk to them about how it all came to be. "We didn't want Jett's story to be recognisably the world we know," creative director Craig Adams tells me. "From the start, there was always this idea of a planet like Earth, but something got scrambled and the societies didn't pan out exactly as we know them today. What does that space program look like? And what motivates those people?" They wanted a relatable-enough experience where characters were grounded, and not too cartoon-ish. But as the ideas for Jett became more and more ambitious, one battle the devs chose not to fight was voice acting. "Had we gone down that road, not only would that complexity have overwhelmed us, but we would've been back in that world making a snappy English script that would've lost some specialness," Adams explains. Now, creating an entire fictional language is also a pretty ambitious undertaking, but it wasn't part of the initial plan. At first, Adams brought in a couple of friends, one who speaks Arabic and one who speaks Inuktitut, and had them record a number of lines that the devs could play with. "What we had as temporary coverage was a bunch of Arabic and a bunch of Inuktitut which we put into blenders and rearranged," he tells me. "So you're hearing the dialogue, you're hearing the heart and soul of a person but in a language you can't perceive. And it was promising, I liked what we were getting out of it, but it had a limit to the quality, and so we had to develop what our next step was gonna be." Artwork and designs for Jett: The Far Shore, by Craig D. Adams, Sam Bradley and Dustin Harbin for Superbrothers. Meanwhile over in the sound department, the Jett team were looking into choral music. They wanted the characters to sing, so composer Andrew Rohrmann (who previously worked on Oxenfree) had been cooking up synthetic voices. But there was a limit to how much they could do with this sort of sound design, and yet again they needed someone to solve a pretty specific problem. Enter sound designer Priscilla Snow. She came to the attention of Adams and Rohrmann because, not only was she familiar with the type of choral singing they were after, but she has family history with shape note and Sacred Harp singing, one of the oldest forms of American social choral music. "I had gotten a message from Andy because he had seen a Tweet I had made about my relation to the shape notes singing master who's in my family," Snow tells me. "So he sent m
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Will you craft your men, or will someone else craft your world? Last time, you decided that fiddling with environmental objects (henceforth known as fiddlebits) is better than rocket jumping. A toughie there, no doubt; I thank you for your careful deliberation. Next up, we're settling an issue of whose hand shapes game, whether you're getting hands-on with your mens or having someone else lovingly handcraft the entire world for you. What's better: unit designers, or handcrafted art? Unit designers I have spent long hours in Stellaris designing many spaceships to fill my fleet with complimentary and contrasting roles. I have grand visions of how they counter my foes, imagining my choices of weapons and carriers and countermeasures will lead to masterful manouvers and tricky traps. Oh, how foolish they will feel when they attempt to fall upon my backline and are torn up by flak! I am fairly certain that every unit I have hand-designed is worse than the game's auto-complete suggestions, and my decisions have led to the deaths of billions of citizens. But it does make me feel like a galactic mastermind. Buddy, I'm not even sure what a picket ship is. I adore designing my own units. Give me a pool of perks, weapons, attributes, or whatever and I will happily tinker and coo and probably forget what I was supposed to be doing. The dress-up fun of character creators combined with the belief that actually, what I'm doing is really important. Sometimes it is. Often it is! And I'm just bad at it. That's fine; I'm having a grand old time. Especially if it's a game like Impossible Creatures letting me make daft animals. The edges of this are blurry. Do your handcrafted vehicles in physics sandbox Besiege count as "units" if you only have one? Does customising units in XCOM or even characters in RPGs count? I suppose you could make a case for it, if you want to. Do you want to? I'll certainly let you try, though it's not me you have to convince. Handcrafted art Hylics is possibly the prettiest video game series. Modelling clay and real hands smoosh together in one dreamy look oozing vibes. Also, sometimes oozing melting fleshing. I adore it. It's gorgeous. The first-person spellcasting animations with gloved hands conjuring clay oddities are supremely cool. Some of the very best-looking games, these, made largely with stuff you played with as a kid. The Dream Machine! Lumino City! Beeswing! So many games with clay and cardboard and paper and paints and pencils and wood and rubbish! I adore dioramas, dollhouses, and stop-motion animation, and hugely respect the craft behind them. The best time I've ever had at EGX was sacking it off to visit the dollhouse show elsewhere at the NEC, cooing over tiles, houseplants, handbags, vegetables, and so many other tiny familiar objects. I bought a miniscule tiny corkscrew made of ebony and titanium from a man who insisted it would outlast my mortal body. Tiny handcrafted things are a shortcut to wonder by turning the mundane into the magic. Combining that with the Merlin-grade wizardry that is video games can be truly wondrous. A mu
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Learn how to make and activate a Beacon in Minecraft Want to know how to make and activate a Beacon in Minecraft? Beacons have two very important uses in Minecraft, as they give you status effects whilst also emitting a beam of light that can act as a waypoint marker to guide you and your friends home. This guide will walk you through everything you need to know to make and use a Beacon in Minecraft, including how to get a Nether Star, which is one of the ingredients you will need. On this page: How to make a Beacon in Minecraft How to build a Pyramid for the Beacon in Minecraft How to activate a Beacon in Minecraft What status effects do you get from the Beacon in Minecraft? How to change the colour of the Beacon's beam in Minecraft How to make a Beacon in Minecraft To make a Beacon in Minecraft, you need to gather 5 pieces of Glass, 3 blocks of Obsidian, and a Nether Star. Glass and Obsidian are relatively easy to obtain: smelt sand in a furnace to get Glass, and pour a bucket of Water over Lava to get Obsidian. Remember that you need a Diamond or Netherite Pickaxe to mine Obsidian. To get a Nether Star, you need to defeat the Wither, which is a boss mob. When you kill the Wither, it will drop one Nether Star, which is only used when making the Beacon. To make a Beacon, you need to combine these ingredients in the following order: However, you can’t just place it down and use it. First, you need to build a Pyramid, which is your first step towards activating the Beacon. How to build a Pyramid for the Beacon in Minecraft To activate a Beacon, you must place it on top of a Pyramid. The Pyramid must be built from Iron, Gold, Diamond, Netherite, or Emerald blocks. You can use a mixture of these if you don’t have enough of a single type of block. You must make the Pyramid with between one and four layers. The taller you make the Pyramid, the more effects you can gain from the Beacon. The size of the Pyramid also increases the range within which you can gain the status effects. To get the most out of your Beacon, you should make a 4-level Pyramid. For the base layer, place your blocks in a 9x9 square. Then, place a 7x7 square on top, followed by a 5x5 square and then a 3x3 square for the top layer. When you have constructed the Pyramid, place your Beacon on top of the centre block on the top layer to activate it. If you don’t have enough blocks to make a Pyramid with 4 layers, you can remove the bottom layer to make it a slightly weaker Pyramid. For example, if you only have enough blocks for 3 layers, you can make the base layer the 7x7 square and then keep building up to make a 3-level Pyramid. However, this will remove some of the possible bonus effects. How to activate a Beacon in Minecraft When you place your Beacon on top of the Pyramid, it will light up. However, you will not gain any status effects straight away. There’s one more step that you need to complete first. Interact with the Beacon to bring up its menu. This will list all of the status effects that you are able to activate. Select a primary power (and a secondary power if
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Magical teens save the world, duh Get In The Car, Loser! begins as all RPGs about young protagonists with magical powers do—just a lot more bluntly. The world is being threatened by the evil Machine Devil and the Machine Devil cultists, and apparently no one is going to save it if not your plucky party of heroes. So hop on in the back seat, you dork. Get In The Car, Loser!, a free game written by Christine Love of Ladykiller In A Bind fame, is now fueled up and headed out on its self-proclaimed "lesbian road trip RPG". "Three young attendees of the local Academy of Order and one renegade angel from the D
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The world is your rainbow Oh rejoice, a Sims 4 update that's all for me. Maxis have just dropped a free update which
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Happy 10th anniversary Dark Souls! Here's to you, Sin the Slumbering Dragon. And to you, Crossbreed Priscilla. Chin-chin! Oi, not to you Ornstein, or to you, Smough. How did you even get in, anyway? This is an invitation only event for bosses who have cuttable tails. There's a tinge of sadness to this celebration, though. Cuttable tails were all the rage back in the original Dark Souls but now they're lost to time, never to be seen again, just like the tails you cut off themselves. Although a part
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I went hands-on with roughly an hour's worth of Marvel's Guardians Of The Galaxy last week, and I have come away pleasantly surprised. I'll ad
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Plus tweaks Skye and Kay/o, and Fracture is in competitive rotation If you play Valorant, you undoubtedly know one of those Jett players. The sort that will very un-tactfully launch all three of their smokes in a messy line so they can dash into or out of fights, bamboozling their teammates just as much as the enemy team. It should be a little harder for these speedy knife-slingers to perform such daft feats in the future, because Riot Games have taken away one of Jett's smokes, and they've nerfed her knives to boot. Patch 3.06 arrived in Riot's tactical FPS last night, giving tweaks to a handful of characters. First up, Jett has lost one of her smoke charges, so she'll only have two going forward. The devs say that having three smokes "contributed to a sense that she could get away with using them at any time, have more to spare, or spam them without much thought." Hopefully, Jett players will think a bit more about where they launch them now. Jett's ultimate ability, Bladestorm, has also been tweaked. When she uses this, she basically gets to throw five very fast and very precise knives that will murder someone with one hit to the head. Left click throws them one at a time, while right clicking will shotgun all five at once in a less precise action, and getting a kill with either method would reset the knives, giving her all five back to throw again. Now, shotgunning the knives will not reset them, because the developers want to encourage the high-precision gameplay, rather than the low-risk-low reward option. She has one tiny buff to counteract that though, and that's that the burst-fire knives will now do the same amount of damage as the slow fire. Previously, each burst knife dealt slightly lower damage, and it was confusing trying to figure out how much damage you actually did. These are interesting changes, mostly because I've found that the shotgun-like knife burst was never that useful in the first place. Even up-close, the knives have a tendency to fling off in weird directions and miss your enemies. I'm all for making Jett players be slightly more tactical tho
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Golden leaves, pumpkins, moist vibes, and yes Halloween too Today brings the autumn equinox and the start of the season where things, like, fall. It's a good season! I will always mourn the end of summer but I relish the brief window to hike through golden forests, swimming through shoals of leaves in rivers, cosy up around bonfires with cocoa, and break out the warm duvet again. But while we wait for the season to properly kick in, I'm curious: which autumns in video games do you enjoy? Yes, Halloween included. Lieve Oma captures the best of autumn: a walk through the woods with someone you love. We're off out with our grandma to pick penny bun mushrooms (porcini), and have a bit of a natter along the way. It's a game I can almost smell. I have much of the same planned for my own autumn, though I'll probably not pick mushrooms because I don't trust my judgment and do prefer my guts to be inside me. But this game is very nice. It's $3 on Itch. I do also enjoy autumn in Stardew Valley. It captures the feeling that autumn is lovely but bittersweet because it wi
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Learn how to spawn and defeat the Wither boss in Minecraft Want to know how to spawn and defeat the Wither boss in Minecraft? The Wither is one of the most formidable enemies in Minecraft, and is one of only two boss mobs that can be encountered in the game. If you’re ready to fight the terrifying monster then gear up and read on, as this guide will walk you through everything that you need to know to find and beat the Wither in Minecraft. On this page: How to spawn the Wither in Minecraft How to defeat the Wither in Minecraft Wither boss battle phase 1 Wither boss battle phase 2 What do you get for defeating the Wither How to spawn the Wither in Minecraft To spawn the Wither into your world, you need to create a specific structure using Soul Sand or Soul Soil and 3 Wither Skeleton Skulls. You can find all of these ingredients in the Nether. If you want to access the Nether quickly, check out our list of Seeds to find the ideal world for a Nether rush. Once you have the items you need, place them in the following shape: The Wither will not spawn unless the last block that you place is one of the Wither Skeleton Skulls, so make sure that you save one of them until last. As soon as you place the final skull, the Wither will spawn into your world and the boss fight will begin. Grab any armour, weapons, potions, and food that you want before you place the last skull and start the fight. How to defeat the Wither in Minecraft Like the Ender Dragon, the Wither has a health bar that you must whittle down to zero. When the Wither reaches half health, its behaviour will change slightly, splitting this battle into two phases. Wither boss battle phase 1 Phase 1 begins when the Wither first appears in the Overworld. It will slowly get bigger until it explodes in a fiery burst, which damages everything around the Wither and kicks off the fight. During the first phase, the Wither will hover around and search around for any players and mobs other than undead. When it finds a target, it will lock onto it and fire Wither Skulls from its three heads. Upon impact, these Wither Skul
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Happy 10th anniversary, you leeches So, thought you’d take all your great Lordran chums out for a drink to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Dark Souls, did you? Bad times, pal. Sure, they’ll take care of any everlasting dragons you happen to have hanging around on your lawn, but when it comes to a night on the bevvies, they might well be the sorriest bunch of cheapskates since Final Fantasy 8’s GFs. Consider this your one and only warning before these fantasy grifters clear you out for the month. Great Grey Wolf Sif Absolute chancer, this one. Will deliberately suggest you go somewhere that doesn’t let dogs in then stare at you sadly through the window, pawing the glass. You’ll feel like a monster, go outside, and pour at least three pints into her bowl. Carries an impractically gargantuan sword in her mouth at all times, which is her handy excuse for why she can't carry her shitting wallet anywhere. Likely Damage: At least three pints. At least. Gravelord Nito Complete buzzkill. Will follow you to a rave and get stroppy when the DJ doesn’t have any Elliot Smith and then sulk in the corner listening to Interpol on his Airpods. Is made of approximately 50 bajillion thick skulls but can’t get it through any of them that he’s being a massive downer. Yes, we know, we’re all going to die mate. Just drop it. Likely Damage: The entire day, honestly. Seath the Scaleless Seath the penniless, more like. Seath the skint. Seath the scrounge. Seath the suspiciously in the pissers every time it’s their turn to get a round in. Seath the “spend millenia researching the secret to immortality just so I can flounce for all eternity”. Seath the sponge. Seath the secretly loaded but also secretly bitter about the whole ‘war against the dragons’ thing so decided to take his personal reparations out on you, specifically, one IPA at a time. Seath the shit. Likely Damage: Six IPAs, all the shots, and a couple of tinnies back at yours while he whines, at length, about his scales. Ornstein and Smough Ornstein and fucking no, more like. Likely Damage: Non
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. They're still investigating another possible stutter source, mind New Arkane Studios sneak-o-shooter Deathloop is a good'un, but the PC launch was marred by technical problems which caused the framerate to stutter for many players. One week later, they've put out a patch which should fix the stuttering for many folks playing with a mouse. However, you might not find the game hunky-dory now, as they say they're still investigating another potential stutterorama. Always tricky when multiple issues create similar-looking outcomes. Hotfix 1.708.4.0 launched yesterday evening.
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. I spend roughly 90% of my free time watching what the YouTube algorithm offers me. I've not been radicalised yet, although I do now refer to any shopping I buy as a "haul" and end all my conversations by thanking Skillshare. To my surprise, the algorithm has recently started throwing indie games my way. Hero's Hour is among the most interesting it's shown me: a strategy RPG in which you construct armies of pixelated fantasy beasts who then have automated battles. In Hero's Hour, you stomp around an overworld, build your hometown and venture out to explore new regions. It's turn-based and
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Adding big blue men called Mutoids Phoenix Point's fourth DLC is due on October 1st. Corrupted Horizons adds a new corruption mechanic which can sap the will of your squad, as well as new Mutoid soldiers, pictured above. The Mutoids are immune to corruption, can learn any class's skills, but are unable to heal. Corrupted Horizon's biggest new enemy is the Acheron, a four-legged strider that heefs corruption around a level. Units affected by corruption take a hit to their willpower, and as attacks stack your units can become unable to use some of their abilities. Mutoids, meanwhile, are immune. Grown directly from Mutagens, one of Phoenix Point's resources, Mutoids are soldiers that can learn any class's skills, including those of the enemies you encounter. To counter that strength, they can select fewer skills at each level, reach max rank faster than humans, and are unable to heal when wounded. The idea is that, as you progress through a game, you're force
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. I feel as if the header image successfully conveys the appeal of Joe Richardson's work. He makes point-and-click adventures which take real Renaissance paintings, animate them in cut-out style (think Monty Python), and juxtapose them with modern vernacular. His next game was announced today. It's called Death Of The Reprobate, and there's a trailer showing both pointing and clicking below. Richardson referred to the game on Twitter as the third and final isntalment of his "Renaissance point and click triptych." The previous two games were Four Last Things and The Procession To Cavalry. In her Procession To Cavalry review, Alice B appreciated its writing, though not without caveats. Richardson's writing is both warm and appreciably dark in its humour, and given to asides and footnotes like those you'd find in a Terry Pratchett book. But at the same time, not every joke can land. The couple of times when the fourth wall was broken, for example (with Richardson appearing as God, as creators are wont to do when they show up in their own work), rubbed me decidedly up the wrong way. Calvary, probably unavoidably, features a lot of poking fun at the church and messianic figures alike, but I did sometimes feel like the poke was more like an elbow being dug into my side. Although the third of a series, Reprobate promises a standalone story. There's no release date as yet, but you can read more about it over on Steam.
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. The PC Health Check app is back for all Microsoft have put their PC Health Check app back online. The simple tool is designed to tell you whether Windows 11 is compatible with your computer, but it was pulled offline back in June when it kept telling people with modern PCs that they couldn't run the new operating system, with little information as to why not. It's more recently been available to members of the Windows Insider program, but it's back now for all. When first taking the PC Health Check offline, Microsoft admitted in a blog post that the app "was not fully prepared to share the level of detail or accuracy you expected from us on why a Windows 10 PC doesn’t meet upgrade requirements." A lot of the problems related to Trusted Platform Module version 2.0, or TPM 2.0. The feature is a required part of Windows 11's security systems, but it's not present on all motherboards. To make matters more confusing, some motherboards which do support it still don't have the feature switched on in the BIOS. Confronted with a TPM2.0 issue, the PC Health Check app would only say that the user's processor was not supported by Windows 11. All my dreams are coming true. The revised version of the PC Health Check app however will give a message that says "TPM
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Visit Tokyo for a deadly game next Tuesday Following its debut on PlayStation 4 and Switch in July, Square Enix plan to bring Neo: The World Ends With You over to PC on the 28th of September. That's next Tuesday, day dudes. It's the sequel to an RPG from the Nintendo DS in 2007, set inside a colourful and weird version of Tokyo where young'uns get drawn into a deadly game.
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Rotting away in the great Blackreef After getting a taste last week, both myself and Matthew have spent the last few days in Blackreef. We've been enjoying doing the same things over and over. Yeah, Deathloop is pretty good. Before we chat about our looping adventures in Arkane's FPS, we discuss the recently leaked Nvidia GeForce Now list. You're not going to win any prizes for guessing that some of these games will come to PC, but the prospect of others is a little bit more exciting. I mean, I know I could really g
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Testing out 4v4s this Thursday, and 12v12s next week If you're not too busy Deathlooping, Kena: Bridge Of Spiriting, or Diablo 2: Resurrecting this weekend, perhaps you'll have a spare moment to drop into Halo Infinite's next technical preview. Between Thursday and Sunday, players registered as a Halo Insider will have a chance to try out the sci-fi FPS's 4v4 Arena mode. But that's not all! 343 have announced that the following weekend, Insiders can jump into another tech test, and have a crack at the game's 12v1
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A blast from the past, but not necessarily in a good way Call Of Duty: Vanguard's multiplayer feels familiar, have I been here before? Yes, in the past, but also in the future. Despite its World War II setting, Vanguard's open beta has me thinking back to the days of Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare. Having played a sizable chunk of it now, I'm not kidding when I say that it's like the Modern Warfare lot LARPING on a WWII set. For some this will be good. For others this will be bad. For me? It needs Warzone. One thing's for sure, boot technology clearly hasn't changed between WWII and modern day. Movement feels incredibly similar to Modern Warfare: slides, crouches, sprints, I'd be hard-pressed to tell them apart
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. The not-so-secret cow level isn't as hard to find as you might think Looking for the secret cow level in Diablo 2: Resurrected? The cow level became Diablo 2’s worst-kept secret in the decades following its release. This infamous hidden zone contains armies of halberd-wielding Hell Bovines that swarm players, plus the goofily named Cow King boss. The cow level is a fun little side area to run, and it will of course be present in Diablo 2: Resurrected. If you missed out on the original and don’t know how to find the portal, we’re here to help. How to access the se
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The best Crossbow loadout for dropping enemies with a single shot in Warzone Looking for the best Crossbow loadout to bring into Warzone? It's certainly a unique option to consider in a game all about firearms and high tech weaponry. Still there's fun to be had when wielding this modern take on a medieval weapon, and it's more than capable of one-shotting enemies if you have the skills to wield it. Just don't take the Crossbow into Warzone with the expectation of dominating. It's a novelty at best, and you should be using the best guns in Warzone if your goal is to win. Here's the best Crossbow loadout in Warzone: Cable: 28-Strand Cable Arms: XRK Thunder 200 Lb Stock: FORGE TAC Speedtrak Bolt: FTAC Fu
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With five silly games, including Drawful with animation You've got a checklist for Halloween: peeled grapes (eyeballs); cold spaghetti (worms); 12-foot skeleton (skeleton); 25 metre bolt of black cotton (costume). But wait, what will people play? Friendo, you're in lucko. Jackbox Games have announced that The Jackbox Party Pack 8, their latest collection of funny party games, will launch on October 14th. It'll pack five games, from murder mystery to a new version of fan-favourite Drawful, this time having players animate their drawings. Jackbox have explained the Pack's five games in blog posts. Drawful: Animate expands the popular draw-o-guessing game to make two-frame looping animations based on supplied
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The devil doesn't play fair, and neither will you Everything about Rogue Lords is very Halloween-y. It's an upcoming gothic roguelike in which you, the devil, send disciples out into the world to wage war with demon hunters and cause general mischief in the mortal world. Having played a bit myself, I already feel the need to start carving pumpkins and hanging up fake cobwebs around my house. It reminds me of all the spooky animated films you see on the telly throughout October, which makes sense because the developers at Cyanide and Leikir Studios tell me the game's art style is partially inspired by Tim Burton films. Now I know Tim Burton-inspired things can be a little polarising, but playing Rogue Lords is
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Here's everything that you need to know to make a Book in Minecraft Want to know how to make a Book in Minecraft? Books are very important, as you will need them to enchant your armour and weapons with various effects. You can also make pretty bookshelves to spruce up your home, if you aren’t interested in becoming an all-powerful wizard. This guide will walk you through everything that you need to know to make a Book in Minecraft, including how to get Paper and Leather, which you will need. On this page: How to make a Book in Minecraft How to get Leather in Minecraft How to get Paper in Minecraft How to use Books in Minecraft How to make Bookshelves in Minecraft How to make a Book and Quill in Minecraft
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Learn how to put together the best possible Sangonomiya Kokomi build in Genshin Impact. Want to learn how to create the best build for Sangonomiya Kokomi in Genshin Impact? Kokomi has been present in Genshin Impact since August's V2.0 update as an NPC, but a playable version of the character is now available as part of the Drifting Luminescence event (running from September 21st to October 12th). Sangonomiya Kokomi is the leader of the Sangonomiya Resistance, a group opposed to the decrees of the Raiden Shogun in her capacity as Archon of Inazuma. Given that Kokomi is pretty much a mermaid, she's unsurprisingly a Hydro Catalyst wielder. Like her nemesis, Kokomi is a limited-time character, so read on below for
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Want to learn about all the boss fights in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? There is a grand total of 16 boss fights (that is, fights with big boss health bars at the top) in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits - and like everything else in Ember Lab's marvellous action-adventure game, each one offers some true spectacle. If you're looking for a list of all the boss fights and some advice on how to beat each one, you've come to the right place. Keep scrolling to check out all 16 bosses in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, presented in the order you'll face them. Obviously, major spoilers follow. You've been warned. Kena: Bridge Of Spirits boss fights: all 16 bosses in order Including both minibosses and true story bosses, there are 16 boss fights in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits (17 if you count the
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Several high-level execs have been subpoenaed The US government's Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) are investigating Activision Blizzard over the company's handling of sexual misconduct and harassment allegations. This comes just two months after the Call Of Duty publishers were sued by a State department for alleged workplace harassment, discrimination, and retaliation. Now, The SEC have subpoenaed a number of high-level executives, reportedly including CEO Bobby Kotick, and have requested internal documents relating to the allegations. According to The Wall Street Journal (watch out for the paywall), the SEC have launched a "wide-ranging" investigation into Activision Blizzard. They allegedly wa
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Here's how to solve the Fishing Shrine puzzle in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Wondering how to restore the Fishing Shrine in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? Each of the other Shrines in the Forgotten Forest of Kena: Bridge Of Spirits are guarded by enemies, but the Fishing Shrine is guarded by a puzzle. And at first glance this puzzle may be a confusing one, because you may not even realise that a puzzle needs to be solved. Follow the steps below to learn how to restore the Fishing Shrine in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits! How to restore the Fishing Shrine in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Fairly early on in the story of Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, you're sent on a mission to collect three relics belonging to Beni and Saiya's brother,
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So you want to kill a Colt? Then you’ll have to learn to think like one As I pass the eroding façade of a fisherman’s hut, a beret-topped goon strides by in the opposite direction, casually swinging a machete. They’d be conspicuous were it not for the fact that there are no fishermen in this village anymore. If anyone were to bother putting up a welcome sign, it’d read ‘Population: Goons’. They like me, though. This thug’s two-tone mask might be impassive, but the voice beneath it betrays starstruck awe. “Julianna,” they say. “It’s an honour, really.” “Shut the fuck up,” I hiss under my breath. “I’m in disguise. If the player hears you, we’re both mince. And thanks.” This
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Collect artifacts, solve puzzles, and sneak around mysterious ruins De-Exit is an upcoming voxel puzzle platformer where you play as a skeleton person investigating strange happenings in the afterlife. You died and landed yourself in the in-between part, not quite heaven and not quite hell, but it's clear that something is a bit wrong. You'll need to explore ruins, collect artifacts and figure out why spooky goo is trying to engulf parts of the world. It's a bit Zelda-y and a bit Tomb Raider-y, but if both those games were filled with cubes. During a Q&A, developers SandBloom Studio said that part of the idea behind De Exit is to show the different ways that people think about death. They compare it to the
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I wonder if it has a matching hat and gloves Do you ever see something in a game and think, "Man, I wish that was real"? And I don't mean magic or spaceships because obviously those are great, but a specific item that would just be so cool to have. I want the scarf from Scarf, an upcoming puzzle platformer about a little blue dude trying to get home. This character has a firey red scarf that does dragon things! When you double jump, it turns into little dragon wings! 10/10 winter wear. Scarf is the debut game from Spanish developers Uprising Studios. Parts of it remind me of Journey, except instead of just vast deserts, you get to explore underwater zones and lush green areas too. Right, so back to the dragon scarf. Sometimes, it turns into a wiggly dragon to show you the way, and also you can pet it. Then when you get more abilities, the scarf will do more cute dragon-y things! An absolute delight. The plot of the game is that some naughty souls have stolen the key to your home, and are using magic to create worlds you need to puzzle your way through. There's no combat, just adventure and exploration. While some puzzles involve your neckwear, others involve finding big pretty orbs that change the environment around you. One of these orbs is able to part water, so when you pick it up you can go wandering through the sea, watching it move around you as you go. It's very nice-looking water too, the kind that really makes you wanna go for a swim. Scarf is set to release sometime this year. Uprising Studios said they're at the "bug-squashing phase" of development, so hopefully
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The devs want to deliver an "eco-conscious" message Endling is going to break my heart. It's a game about a mama fox trying to look after her pups in an unpleasant future where forests are being destroyed, pollution is rife and these poor animals have been hunted to near-extinction. It's sad, because it really doesn't seem to distant a future from real life, but that's kind of the point. Endling looks gorgeous and poignant, the sort of game that seems important to play, even if it does break my heart. The game starts as a sort-of linear side-scrolling adventure, before turning into more of a sandbox experience. Your main goal is to look after your little fox babies, and you'll need to venture out from your fox hole to find food for them. Then as the game progresses, you'll need to go to new areas to find other places to take shelter too. It looks similar to Shelter, a game about a mama badger looking after her own cubs. At first your fox cubs are pretty helpless, leaving you to venture out on your own to catch mice and rummage through trash to bring back food. But once they grow up a little, they'll start adventuring with you. One of your other objectives in Endling is to find one of your cubs that was stolen too, so you're constantly fueled by the need to survive, protect and save your babies. The cubs don't stay helpless though. They'll each get their own ability to help their mum out. Lose a cub, however, and you'll lose access to that skill. Lose all your cubs, and it's game over. To crush your heart even further, each instrument you hear in the soundtrack is linked to one of
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You need to be an Xbox Insider Program member for now, though One of the cool things about the official Xbox Series X/S wireless controllers – if we’re using a dramatically expanded definition of the word “cool” – is that they can pair to both the console and a Bluetooth-enabled PC or laptop, then switch between both sources with a double-tap or hold of the pairing button. In what could be good news for owners of older, Xbox One-era wireless controllers, Microsoft are now rolling out a firmware update that brings this same quick-switch functionality to the more aged pads. The announcement post specifically names “Xbox One controllers with Bluetooth support, [the] Xbox Elite Wireless Controller Series 2, and Xbox Adaptive Controllers” are compatible hardware. Once the update is installed, it should be possible to connect the controller between to both a host device using the Xbox Wireless protocol (i.e. an Xbox) and a second Bluetooth source, i.e. your PC or laptop. Once both are connected, double-tapping the pairing button will switch between the two almost instantly. Obviously you can’t play games on two devices at once, but this could be handy for, say, playing on a gaming laptop while using your Xbox to stream TV in the background. Or just finishing a game session on console and immediately starting another on PC without having to manually re-pair? Either way, it’s nice that older wireless Xbox controllers are getting the upgrade; it’s not too hard to imagine Microsoft keeping it as a Series X/S controller exclusive so folks with multiple game machines are pressured to upgrade their pad. And support for the more inclusive Xbox Adaptive Controller is always welcome. However, the firmware update isn’t available to everyone yet. It’s currently part of the Xbox Insider Program, which is essentially a giant beta test for upcoming Xbox features. It’s free to join, and you can do so on PC by installing the Xbox Insider Hub app from the Microsoft Store, but if you do so just to update your wireless controller, remember that the firmware won’t be the
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A bridge over troubled waters Atmosphere can feel almost superfluous in video games at the moment. Despite its very obvious importance, there’s sometimes an assumption that if the more mechanical parts of a game serve their purpose - and do so reliably - then elements like immersion, environment and art style are merely contributors to a solid product. But my view is to the contrary; I think it’s usually those elements that turn a game into a phenomenon. This is very clearly proven by Kena: Bridge Of Spirits. The first game by animation studio Ember Lab, Kena: Bridge Of Spirits is an action-adventure set in a mystical village troubled by spirits with unfinished business. These souls, traumatized by events in their lives, are now unable to pass on. Kena, a spirit guide, is responsible for helping them find their way to the afterlife, while on her own journey to a sacred mountain shrine. During her travels, Kena encounters an elusive species called the Rot - spirits reminiscent of the soot sprites in Spirited Away - who help her clear the 'corruption' that's spreading throughout their forest home. One of the most striking elements, made abundantly clear on starting the game, is Kena's art
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Here's the full selection of Hats available in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Looking for a list of all the Hats in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? Yes, you can find Hats for your bouncy little spirit friends in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, and you can purchase these hats at Hat Carts in order to dress your Rot army up exactly how you'd like. Have you ever heard of anything so sickeningly adorable? I sure haven't. Below you'll be able to take a look at every single Rot Hat in the game, along with their cost in Gems and some information on how these cosmetic items can be procured at a Hat Cart. Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Hats list Below is a screenshot of all 51 Rot Hats in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, so you can see what each hat looks like while worn by a Rot. Here are the names of each Rot Hat, along with their cost in Gems: Autumn: 10 Gems Pot: 10 Gems Baseball: 10 Gems Mushroom: 10 Gems Whirly Bird: 10 Gems Butterfly: 10 Gems Beetle: 10 Gems Ladybird: 10 Gems Feather: 10 Gems Acorn: 10 Gems Stinky Fruit: 10 Gems Flower: 10 Gems Pinecone: 10 Gems Purple Mushroom: 10 Gems Yellow Mushroom: 10 Gems Clover: 10 Gems Bow: 10 Gems Egg: 10 Gems Cowboy: 25 Gems Pumpkin: 25 Gems Sunflower: 25 Gems Bird's Nest: 25 Gems Squash: 25 Gems Sun: 25 Gems Star: 25 Gems Crown: 25 Gems Pancake: 25 Gems Halo: 25 Gems Deer: 100 Gems Fishing: 100 Gems Frog: 100 Gems Taro: 100 Gems Cat: 100 Gems Dog: 100 Gems Fox: 100 Gems Bunny: 100 Gems Samurai: 100 Gems Mask: 100 Gems Ox: 500 Gems, only 1 can be purchased Taro's Mask: 500 Gems, only 1 can be purchased Hana's Mask: 500 Gems, only 1 can be purchased Adira's Mask: 500 Gems, only 1 can be purchased Toshi's Mask: 500 Gems, only 1 can be purchased Sibling's Mask: 500 Gems, only 2 can be purchased Rusu's Mask: 500 Gems, only 1 can be purchased Zajuro's Mask: 500 Gems, only 1 can be purchased Hunter: 500 Gems, only 1 can be purchased Mask Maker: 500 Gems, only 1 can be purchased Warrior: 500 Gems, only 1 can be purchased Dinosaur: 500 G
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Here are all 41 achievements in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Looking for a full list of all Kena: Bridge Of Spirits achievements? There is a grand total of 41 achievements to collect in Ember Lab's beautiful and incredibly enjoyable action-adventure title, and they run the gamut in challenge. Some require you to simply play through the story, so you'll unlock them either way eventually. Others require you to go out of your way collecting or setting up particular combat encounters to complete them. Below you'll find a full list of all 41 achievements you can earn in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, along with a few bits of advice on how to unlock some of the more challenging ones. Warning: major spoilers follow! Roughly half of these achievements are story-related. I've listed them at the bottom of the table so you can view the other achievements without seeing the story spoilers if you so wish. Achievement How to unlock Good as New Restore a Flower Shrine. Restoration Master Restore all of the Flower Shrines. Curse Collector Open all Cursed Chests. Zen Master Meditate at all Meditation Spots. No Stone Unturned Find all of the Rot. Hat Collector Collect all Rot Hats. The Last Stop Deliver all Spirit Mail. Skillful Spirit Guide Unlock all ability upgrades. Say Cheese Capture a picture in Photo Mode. Master Spirit Guide Beat the game on Master difficulty. Between the Eyes Destroy a Shield Sticks enemy without breaking his shield. Weigh Them Down Destroy a Moth enemy with a Bomb. Return to Sender Destroy a Mage with its own bomb. Rot Commander Use 5 Rot Actions in a single combat. Piercing Blow Hit 3 enemies with a single Rot Infused Arrow. Quick Draw Hit 3 critical hit spots in 3 seconds. Bow Master Hit 3 enemies with a single Multi-shot. Sharpshooter Destroy an enemy by shooting a Bomb out of the air. Triple Threat Destroy 3 enemies with a single parry. Triple Tap Destroy 3 enemies with a single Dash attack. Found a Friend Hero Rot joined your team. Haikyo Discovered the Village. Into the Woods Discovered the Forest. Hunter in the Forest Learn
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Learn the best ability upgrades to prioritise in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Want to learn more about Kena's abilities and upgrades in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? Early on in Ember Lab's story-driven action-adventure game, you'll learn more about how you can use Karma to upgrade your abilities. Each of these abilities are well worth getting, but some are definitely worth prioritising over others, because they'll help you make quick work of nearly any enemy with some practice. Below we'll walk you through every ability an
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Use these maps to find every collectible in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Looking for a map of Kena: Bridge Of Spirits which shows the locations of all collectibles and hidden areas? Well, you're in luck, because I've spent a painstaking number of hours hundred-percenting Ember Lab's marvellous story-driven action-adventure game, and during my travels I jotted down the exact locations of every single Rot, Hat, Flower Shrine, Meditation Spot, Cursed Chest, and Spirit Mail in the game. Below you'll find ten maps of variou
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If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy. Here's how to clear Hay Piles in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, and why it's important Wondering what to do with Hay Piles in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? You'll find Hay Piles scattered about various areas of the Kena: Bridge Of Spirits map, and it's very unclear at first glance what you're meant to do about them. And it is important that you do something, because sometimes these Hay Piles must be cleared in order to reveal something valuable inside, such as a Rot to add to your growing army of adorable spirits. Learn how to destroy Hay Piles in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits below! How to collect Rot inside Hay Piles in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits If you see a Hay Pile in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits with some glowing particles floating from the top of it, that means there's something beneath that Hay Pile - nothing as large as Spirit Mail or a Meditation Spot, but more likely a Rot to collect. The only way you can get to that Rot is by clearing the Hay Pile. But how do you do it? These are just about the strongest Hay Piles ever to exist in a game; they're resistant to light, heavy, and charged melee attacks, along with attacks from your Spirit Bow, and even your Spirit Bomb. Here's the answer: to destroy Hay Piles, you need to use a Forest Tear. If you see a Hay Pile, there's always gonna be a Forest Tear not too far away. Activate the Forest Tear to temporarily return the Rot to their powerful true form, and then move the Rot over to the Hay Pile and have them attack it with either a spin or a slam attack. This will obliterate the Hay Pile, allowing you to find what is buried beneath it. If something goes wrong, don't worry - the Forest Tear is resuable, so just go back and try again. It's worth noting that not every Hay Pile has something hidden inside. Many are empty. But this information is definitely worth noting for the times where the Hay Pile is actually hiding something noteworthy such as a new Rot. As you'll know if you've read our Kena: Bridge Of Spirits abilities and upgrades walkthrough, it's important to grow your number of Rot over time because it allows you to unlock greater powers to use in combat. So breaking Hay Piles is actually important
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Here's where you can get the Bow in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Wondering how to unlock the bow in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? The bow is an extremely useful part of Kena's toolkit, not only as a powerful weapon but also as a traversal tool, as it can be used as a grappling hook when fired at particular blue flowers dotted about the landscape of Kena: Bridge Of Spirits. Read on to find out where, when, and how to unlock the bow so you can get it as quickly as possible. How to unlock the bow in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits If you've read our spoiler-free primer on how long it takes to beat Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, you'll know that the game is divided roughly into three "Acts". The good news is that you will unlock the bow a short way into the first Act. All you need to do is follow the main story, which will see you being led through the forest by twins Saiya and Beni on a search for their missing brother, Taro. Quite early on in your search, the twins will tell you to go find someone called Rusu, who lives in their lookout at the top of some cliffs. Cue a lot of climbing and battling of monsters - including one particular boss fight against a Kappa in a cave. If you reach this point, you're about to unlock the bow. Once you've defeated the Kappa, ascend the lift out of the cave and you'll be brought to the top of the cliffs. Follow Saiya and Beni and you'll encounter Rusu, who in a beautiful cutscene will teach you how to harness your powers to turn your spirit guide's staff into a bow which can fire energy arrows. After the cutscene you'll immediately get a chance to try out your newfound bow s
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Use these tips and tricks to help Kena reach the Mountain Shrine Looking for some top tips on beating the puzzles and quests of Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? Ember Lab's sumptuous-looking action-adventure game, Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, throws you into a bright, beautiful, and bittersweet world where Kena, a Spirit Guide, is trying to reach a sacred mountain shrine. But first she needs to cleanse the lands of corruption and uncover the mystery of how nature came to be so unbalanced in this part of the world. Kena is a tough game at times, filled with dangerous combat segments, tricky platforming areas, and numerous puzzles you must complete with the help of your spirit friends, the Rot. This beginner's guide to Kena: Bridge Of Spirits will walk you through some top tips which will help you conquer (and enjoy) every aspect of Kena's journey. Here are our top Kena: Bridge Of Spirits tips: Make use of all your abilities in combat Learn how the different collectibles work Come back to old locations once you're stronger Make it a challenge Don't underestimate the boss battles Follow the white painted arrows Enjoy the story! Make use of all your abilities in combat Kena, the soft-spoken and kind-hearted Spirit Guide, only has a single weapon: her ancestral staff. But hidden within this staff and within Kena is a myriad of powerful and unexpected powers, and as you unlock more of them I'd highly en
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Here's how to find all the Spirit Mail in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Looking for all the Spirit Mail in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? One of several different types of collectible in Ember Lab's story-focused action-adventure game, Spirit Mail can be collected and delivered back to certain houses in the central Village in order to unlock new areas and gain rewards. But finding them is often far easier said than done, and these puzzles don't get easier just by changing the difficulty level. Below we'll walk you through where to find all 10 Spirit Mail locations in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, so you can get to work purifying the land of the corruption which has spread across it before you arrived. After you've collected each Spirit Mail you can then see on the map the house in the Village to which it must be delivered. All Spirit Mail locations in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits: Spirit Mail 1: Village Centre Spirit Mail 2: Cliffs on the way to Rusu Mountain Spirit Mail 3: Near the Water Shrine in Forgotten Forest Spirit Mail 4: Near the God Tree Shrine in Forgotten Forest Spirit Mail 5: Right-hand side of Storehouse Spirit Mail 6: Below the Forge in Fields Spirit Mail 7: House above Village Heart Spirit Mail 8: Next to Village Heart cave entrance Spirit Mail 9: Mask Maker Path in Village Spirit Mail 10: Warrior Path in Village If you want to see exactly where the Spirit Mail can be found (along with all other collectibles in the game), check out our Kena: Bridge Of Spirits map guide! Using those maps alongside this walkthrough is the easiest way to find all 10 Spirit Mail, and will speed up how long it takes to complete the game and earn all its achievements. Spirit Mail 1: Village Centre Go up the stairs next to the Hat Cart in the Village centre. Just opposite the barred off house on the left are some steps leading to a house on the right. Go up the steps and round the left side of the house. There's a drum which you can order the Rot to move. Place it on the circle drawn on the ground next to the house wall, so that you can jump onto the drum and then through the gap in the roof. Collect the Spirit Mail in the house, then order the Rot to move the barrier in the house doorway. Start here! Spirit Mail 2: Cliffs on the way to Rusu Mountain Partway through the climbing segment of the path up to Rusu Mountain (just before the broken bridge), you have to jump across to a small platform, and then jump again onto a series of ledges which form two paths. One path goes straight upwards into a cave mouth, the other heads around to the right of the cliff face. Take the right-hand path round, and you'll find a small area with a Spirit Mail inside. Start here! Spirit Mail 3: Near the Water Shrine in Forgotten Forest Warp to the Water Shrine in the Forgotten Forest. Use the Forest Tear to destroy the corruption behind the ruins on your right as you warp in. Behind the corruption is a block of stone which you can direct the Rot to move. Place it down next to the cracked wall between the Warp Shrine and the Hay Pile. Climb up to the new platfor
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Learn how to change difficulty level and unlock Master Spirit Guide Want to know how to change the difficulty level in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? Or perhaps you simply want to figure out which difficulty is right for you before you get stuck into playing? Kena: Bridge Of Spirits offers a choice of four different difficulty levels which change the game up in various ways to make Kena's journey safer or more perilous, depending on which you choose. Keep reading to find out how to change the difficulty level before and during a playthrough, and what each of the difficulty levels change about the game. How to change difficulty level in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits There are four different difficulty levels in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, and each one has an effect on how you build up (or lose) Courage, which is what powers Kena's abilities. Each level of difficulty also increases the challenge by making enemies more aggressive and deal more damage to Kena, meaning you'll need to be careful and clever and make use of all your attack types, from Rot Hammer to Spirit Bow, in order to survive the more dangerous encounters and boss fights on the higher difficulty levels. When starting a new game you choose the difficulty level you want to play on. But don't worry, you can change the difficulty level at any time while playing just by pausing the game, heading into "Settings", then "Game", and changing the difficulty at the top. Just be aware that doing so will force you to restart from your most recent autosave. Which difficulty level is best for you? From easiest to hardest, the four difficulty levels in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits are: Story Mode: Rot abilities recharge passively and when dealing damage. Enemies are less aggressive and deal less damage. Spirit Guide: Rot abilities recharge when dealing damage. Enemies are aggressive. Expert Spirit Guide: Rot abilities recharge when dealing damage. Enemies are very aggressive and deal more damage. Master Spirit Guide: Courage is lost when taking damage. Enemies are even more aggressive and deal even more damage. Cannot lower difficulty. To unlock Master Spirit Guide you must first beat the game on any difficulty level. Be warned though: not only does it provide the greatest amount of challenge, but it also prevents you from lowering the difficulty later on in the game, so be sure that you want the greatest challenge before committing. To put it in perspective: the first enemies you encounter in the tutorial can kill you in two or three hits on the hardest difficulty. If you're wondering how long it'll take to unlock the Master difficulty, check out our page on how long it takes to beat Kena: Bridge Of Spirits. Of course, much of it depends on whether you're beelining the main story quests or if you're going for all the achievements and collectible locations. That's everything you need to know about the four difficulty levels in Kena: Bridge Of Spirits, and how to switch between them on the fly. If you're struggling a bit with the game but don't want to lower the difficulty, be sure to check out our Kena: Bridge Of Spirit
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Learn how long it will take you to beat Kena: Bridge Of Spirits Wondering how long it'll take you to complete Kena: Bridge Of Spirits? It's a question that's preyed on the minds of many a prospective player since Ember Lab, the developers of this outrageously gorgeous new action-adventure game, previously stated in a tweet that "you should be able to finish the game over a weekend". But a weekend of gaming means different things to different people. Does it mean you can blitz through Kena: Bridge Of Spirits in only a few hours, or will it take a solid 20 hours to complete? And does this take into account the man
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